Courses

▌ Academic Course


B.Tech (Naval Architecture & Ocean Engineering Syllabus)
Semester IWinterSemester IISummerSemester IIISemester IVSemester VSemester VISummerSemester VIISemester VIIIElectives
Course No. Course Title L T ExT Lab Home Cr Cat
MA1101 Functions of Several Variables 3 1 0 0 6 10 S
PH1010 Physics I 3 1 0 0 6 10 S
AM1100 Engineering Mechanics 3 1 0 0 6 10 E
CS1100 Introduction to Programming 3 0 0 3 6 12 E
ME1100 Thermodynamics 3 1 0 0 6 10 E
OE1101 Introduction to Naval Architecture & Ocean Engineering 2 0 0 0 4 6 P
Total 17 4 0 3 34 58
NCC/NSS 0 0 0 0 2 0
LIFE SKILLS 0 0 0 0 3 0
Introduction to Ocean Engineering

Objectives

Enable the student to understand and familiarize with Oceanography, marine vehicles and offshore structures

Syllabus

Offshore Structures for oil and gas: Fixed offshore platforms (jackets, gravity platforms, articulated towers); superstructure & foundation, floating platforms (semi-submersibles, jack-ups, TLPS, FPSOs, pipe laying barges); Mooring, station keeping, berthing systems for floating platforms; towing launching & installation of platforms, Nearshore structures.

Marine Vehicles: Oceangoing, ship types, types of small crafts, high speed crafts, vehicles for Inland water transport, special ship types, e.g. warships, icebreakers, types of propulsion systems, marine safety regulation, underwater vehicles and submersibles.

Physical Oceanography: Physical properties of seawater, Different types of ocean waves and their importance, tides, ocean currents, ocean circulation, ocean basin oscillations, Tsunamis, storm surge, Air-sea interaction.

Geological Oceanography: Features of ocean boundaries, geomorphology and structures of ocean floor, marine sediments & formation, types, distribution, marine mineral resources and their geophysical prospecting methods

 

Course No. Course Title L T ExT Lab Home Cr Cat
WS1010 Workshop I 0 0 0 3 0 3 E

 

Course No. Course Title L T ExT Lab Home Cr Cat
MA1102 Series and Matrices 3 1 0 0 6 10 S
PH1020 Physics II 3 1 0 0 6 10 S
PH1030 Physics Lab 0 0 0 3 1 4 S
CY1001 Chemistry I 3 1 0 0 6 10 S
CY1002 Chemistry Lab 0 0 0 3 0 3 S
HSxxxx Humanities Elective - I 3 0 0 0 6 9 H
OE1012 Ship Hydrostatstics and stability 3 1 0 0 6 10 P
Total 15 4 0 6 31 56
NCC/NSS 0 0 0 0 3 0
Ship Theory

Objectives

Enable the student to understand ship geometry, hydrostatics parameters and their estimation, ship floatation stability, various operational effects on ship stability, ship capacity, damaged stability and launching calculations.

Syllabus

Lines plan and hull form coefficients – Hull forms of different types of ships and boats – Numerical techniques for ship calculations- Fluid pressure, centre of pressure – Weight estimation, centre of gravity, effect of shifting weights.

Lightship, deadweight, CG, CB – definitions – Conditions for equilibrium.

Metacentre, Hydrostatic particulars – definition and derivations.

Stability at small angles – heel, trim and angle of loll – Free surface effects – Inclining experiment – Stability at large angles – cross curves of stability – dynamic stability levers- Wind heeling moment, maximum allowable KG – Stability of grounded vessels – Submarine stability – Stability criterion for various types of crafts.

Capacity and tonnage calculations – Trim and stability booklet – Freeboard – Flooding of ships, subdivision and damage stability – Launching – Approximate method of calculation for hydrostatic particulars – data and references.

 

Course No. Course Title L T ExT Lab Home Cr Cat
WS1010 Workshop I 0 0 0 3 0 3 E

 

Course No. Course Title L T ExT Lab Home Cr Cat
MA Mathematics Elective-I 3 0 0 0 6 9 S
EE1100 Basic Electrical Engg. 3 1 0 0 6 10 E
HSxxxx Humanities Elective - II 3 0 0 0 6 9 H
OE2044 Ship Hydrodynamics 3 1 0 0 6 10 P
AM2200 Strength of Materials 3 1 0 0 6 10 P
OE2013 Ship Drawing and Calculations 1 3 0 3 3 10 P
OE2023 Marine Instrumentation Lab 0 0 0 2 0 2 P
Total 16 6 0 5 33 60
Ecology & Environment 2 0 0 0 0 0
Ship Drawing and Calculations

Objectives

To enable the students to get knowledge on basic engineering and ship drawings and ship

Syllabus

calculations, practical knowledge in the use of various naval architecture software.Introduction to basic engineering drawing. Construction of plane curves. Coordinate system projection

of lines and planes. Projection of right regular solids. Section and intersection of

solids and development of surfaces; Systems of projections – principles, conventions and

applications of orthographic and isometric projections. Dimensioning principles and conventional

representations.

Drawing and fairing of lines plan from supplied offset data; Calculations for hydrostatics,

generation of table of offsets, stability calculation,

Introduction to ship design software.

Marine Instrumentation Lab

Objectives

Enable students to get work with basic instruments used in hydrodynamic and structural experiments.

Syllabus

Basics of instrumentation systems

Working principles of different transducers and their calibration : Strain gauges, Potentiometers,

LVDT, Velocity probes, Inclinometers, Accelerometers, Pressure transducers, Wave probes,

Load cells. Introduction to signal conditioning and data acquisition, and sources of errors in

instrumentation systems.

Reference Books :

  1. Instrumentation lab manual
  2. Beckwith,T.G., Marangoni, R.D. and Lienhard, J.H., Mechanical Measurements, Addison

Wesley, USA, 1993

  1. Collacot, R.A., Structural Integrity Monitoring, Chapman and Hall, London, 1985
Course No. Course Title L T ExT Lab Home Cr Cat
MA Mathematics Elective - II 3 0 0 0 6 9 S
BT1010 Life Sciences 3 0 0 0 6 9 S
OE2014 Marine Engineering 3 1 0 0 6 10 P
OE2024 Analysis of Structures 3 1 0 0 6 10 P
OE2034 Ship Resistance and Propulsion 3 1 0 1 6 11 P
OE2054 Ocean Wave Hydrodynamics 3 0 0 1 6 10 P
Total 18 4 0 1 36 59
Marine Engineering

Objectives

  • The students will gain the understanding of marine engineering
  • To design a shipping machinery, they will be able to identify space and requirement of the machinery

The will have clear understanding the know-how of the machinery

Syllabus

Introduction to marine machinery -Types of marine power systems-Engine room layout -Marine diesel engines and their cycles, Fuels Super charging, Ignition and combustion problems-Fuel oil, lubricating oil-Compressed air cooling water systems.

Turbines, pumps, their types and characteristics, cavitation etc.

Marine boilers, Composite boilers-Exhaust gas and heat exchangers-Economizers, Super heaters.

Auxiliary machineries-Choice of power systems for ships.

Fire fighting, Navigational aids, Steering gear, shafting, stern tubes and transmission system.

TEXT BOOKS:

  1. Harrington,R.L. Marine Engineering, SNAME,New York (1992)

2.Taylor,D.A.,Introduction to Marine Engineering,Butterworths,London(1983)

  1. Woodward, J.B.,Low Speed Marine Diesel,Ocean Engineering,A Wiley series(1981)

4. Any standard text books on thermodynamics

Analysis of Structures

Objectives

To enable the students to get basic knowledge on fundamental concept of structural analysis based

on matrix and finite element technique which can help in understanding ocean structures.

Syllabu

Work and energy theorems, Reciprocal theorem, Analysis of indeterminate frames and trusses, Unit load and

conjugate beam methods, introduction to Influence lines diagram, Strain energy of beams, bars and torsion

members, Matrix formulation of displacement method for frame, truss, bar and torsion members, Beam on

elastic foundation and its stiffness matrix, 3D beam element, Transformation, assembly of stiffness matrices.

Beam-column theory, Geometric stiffness matrix, Buckling of bars and frames, Introduction to finite element

method with application to buckling

2D and 3D theory of elasticity, Equilibrium and compatibility equations in cartesian and polar coordinates,

Strain-displacement relations, Plane stress and plane strain, Use of stress function in 2D problems.

Application of matrix methods to problems of marine structures.

Text Books:

  1. L S Srinath, “Advance Mechanics of Solid”, Tata McGraw Hill. New Delhi, 2003
  2. F Guarracino and A Walker, “Energy Methods in Structural Mechanics”, Thomas Telford Publishing,

London, 1999.

  1. Madhulit Mukhopadhyay, Abdul Hamid Sheikh, “Matrix and Finite Element Analysis of Structure”, Ane

Books Pvt Ltd, New Delhi., 2009.

Reference Books:

  1. R D Cook, D S Malkus and M E Plesha, “Concepts and applications of Finite Element Analysis”, John

Wiley & Sons, 1988

  1. D Menon, “Structural analysis”, Narosa, New Delhi, 2010.

3. D Menon, “Advance Structural analysis”, Narosa, New Delhi, 2010

Ship Resistance and Propulsion

Objectives

To enable the students to get basic knowledge on ship resistance components, ship

power estimation methods, ship propulsion systems, propeller design methods, ship model tests for

the determination of ship resistance, ship propeller model tests and application to ship design.

Syllabus

Components of resistance; Form factor; Wave making resistance – ship wave systems,

interference effects, theoretical calculation of wave making resistance, wave breaking

resistance, bulbous bows and their effects.

Dimensional analysis – laws of comparison – geometrical, dynamical and kinematical similarity,

Newton’s, Froude’s and Reynold’s laws, model-ship correlation; Model testing – tank testing

facilities, testing, prediction of resistance from model tests, extrapolation (ITTC 78), Froude’s

concept, laminar influence and tank wall effect, comparison of resistance prediction with results

of full scale trials.

Air and wind resistance, resistance of appendages, added resistance in waves; Resistance in

restricted waterways – resistance in shallow water, resistance in canals; Determination of

resistance from series test results; Resistance of planing crafts, multi-hull vessels, hovercrafts,

hydrofoils, SES.

Introduction to different propulsion systems in ships; Screw propeller-screw propeller geometry,

sections, propeller drawing; Propeller theories – momentum theory, blade element theory,

circulation theory.

Interaction between hull and propeller- wake and wake fraction; thrust deduction factor,

propulsive efficiency in open water and behind conditions, hull efficiency, quasi propulsive

coefficient; Powering; Cavitation – types, cavitation number, effects of cavitation, prevention of

cavitation, design for minimum cavitation, cavitation tests.

Propeller design – propeller series, open water diagrams, design charts; Propeller design and

performance study using design charts; Engine selection; Propeller model tests – test facilities,

laws of comparison, open water test, self-propulsion test; Strength of propellers

Practicals:

  1. Resistance calculation using Guldhammer – Harvald series
  2. Shallow water resistance calculation
  3. Propeller design using series chart
  4. Propeller drawing ?

Experiments:

  1. Model test for ship resistance determination
  2. Flow-line test for identifying bilge keel position
  3. Propeller model open water test in towing tank
  4. Model test for wake fraction determination
  5. Self propulsion model test for thrust deduction fraction determination

Text Books:

  1. John Letcher, Randolph Paulling: Principles of Naval Architecture series-Ship Resistance

and flow, SNAME, U.S.A., 2009.

  1. Antony F Molland, Stephen R turnock, Ship resistance and propulsion-practical estimation of

propulsive power,2011.

  1. William Frederick Durand ; Resistance and Propulsion of Ships, Nabu Press, 2013.

Reference Books:

  1. Harvald S.A.; “Resistance and Propulsion of Ships”, John Wiley & Sons., 1983.
  2. Justin E Kerwin, Jacques B Halder:Principles of Naval Architecture series -Propulsion,

SNAME, New Jersey, 2010.

  1. John Carlton, Marine Propellers and propulsion, 2007.
  2. Baker George Stephen, Ship form, Resistance and screw propulsion, Hard press publishing,

2013.

  1. D.W. Taylor ; The Speed and Power of Ships ; A Manual of Marine Propulsion, Maritime

Press, 2013

9. D. W. Taylor ; Resistance of Ships and Screw Propulsion, Unikum, 2012.

Ship Hydrodynamics

Objectives

To introduce students to different topics of fluid mechanics with emphasis on those having relevance to ship and ocean hydrodynamic applications.

Syllabus

Review: Continuity, Euler, Navier-Stokes (N-S) and Bernoulli equations; Divergence and Stokes

theorems; Potential flow and stream function; Elementary potential flows: parallel flow / source and

sink (2D & 3D) sink / vortex / doublet, flow over circular cylinder with and without circulation.

Role of compressibility; Vector and tensor forms of fluid dynamic equations; Common

nondimensional groups (Froude / Reynolds / Cavitation / Euler / Weber / Strouhal numbers); Stokes

law of viscosity for shear and normal stresses; Circulation and Stokes theorem (2D & 3D); Kelvin’s

circulation theorem and Helmholtz’s vorticity theorems; Vortex line and tube; Vorticity transport

equation, convection and diffusion of vorticity; Potential flow: Laplace equation in cylindrical and spherical coordinates, boundary conditions (rigid and oscillating body or surface, free surface etc.),

superposition of elementary flows, Rankine half and closed bodies etc., method of images, source

or vortex near wall; Kutta-Joukowski theorem and lift; D’Alembert’s paradox; Unsteady flow past

circular cylinder and sphere: added mass; Added mass tensor of rigid bodies in unbounded fluid,

its properties and symmetries; Munk moment; Cavitation; Boundary value problem of gravity waves

and its solution, dispersion and group velocity; Kelvin waves and wave resistance of thin ships.

Lifting surfaces; Foil section characterizations; Flow around a foil: generation of lift, Kutta condition;

Linearised lifting surface theory of thin 2D hydrofoil, thickness and camber problems and their

solutions, lift and moment coefficients.

N-S equations to Prandtl boundary layer (BL) equations by order of magnitude analysis; Dynamic

similarity and boundary conditions; Laminar flow, BL thickness, displacement and momentum

thicknesses; BL separation, bluff and streamlined bodies; Vortex shedding by cylinders, Karman

vortex street, role of Strouhal no.; Vortex induced vibration; Skin friction, BL along a flat plate at

zero incidence, its solution; Blasius formula; Plane Couette flow and Poiseuille flow; Impulsively

started plate; Momentum integral equation of BL; Characteristics of turbulent flow; Drag crisis in

circular cylinder and sphere; Friction due to turbulent BL over flat plate, power law, roughness

effect; N-S equations for mean time averaged quantities: RANS equations and role of CFD.

Applications of all the above in ship design and analysis.

Text Books:

  1. J.N.Newman, Marine Hydrodynamics, MIT Press, 1977
  2. O.M.Faltinsen, Hydrodynamics of High Speed marine Vehicles, Cambridge Uty Press, 2005
  3. V.Betram, Practical Ship Hydrodynamics, B&H, 2000

Reference Books :

3. Principles of Naval Architecture, E. V. Lewis (Ed.), SNAME Publications, 1989

Course No. Course Title L T ExT Lab Home Cr Cat
OE3015 Ship Structural Analysis 3 1 0 0 6 10 P
OE3035 Motion of Ships & Floating Systems 3 1 0 1 6 11 P
OE3035 Ship Design 3 1 0 0 6 10 P
OE3045 Vibration of Marine Structures 3 0 0 0 6 9 P
OE3190 Design of Ocean Structures 3 0 0 0 6 9 P
Free Elective - I 3 0 0 0 6 9 F
Total 18 2 0 2 36 59
Ship Structures

Syllabus

Longitudinal strength-shear force and bending moment-still water and wave loads-deflectionsunsymmetrical

bending-bending stresses and design of midship section.

Shear flow analysis of multicell sections-Torsional analysis-Warping torsion-Determination of

shear and normal stresses-shear lag and effective breadth.

Bending of plates-stiffened, plates-orthotropic, plates-large deflection theories and applications.

Buckling and ultimate strengths of columns, plates and stiffened panels-concept of effective

width-ultimate strength of the hull guider.

Finite elements for simple plated structures-use of computer packages for the analysis of ship

structures.

Text Books:

  1. Hughes, O.E, Ship Structural Analysis and Design, SNAME , 2010
  2. Mansour, A. and Liu, D. Strength of Ships and Ocean Structures, PNA series, SNAME 2008

Reference Books

  1. Jensen, J.J, Load and Global Responses of Ships, Elsevier, 2001
  2. Bai, Y. Marine Structural Design, Elsevier, 2003
Ocean Wave Hydrodynamics

Objectives

To impart B.Tech students with the knowledge on Waves and wave mechanics. Focus is on theoretical description of waves and their practical applications.

Syllabus

Review of Basic Fluid Mechanics: Conservation of mass and momentum, Euler Equations, Bernoulli’s

equation, velocity potential, stream function.

Waves: Classification of water waves – Two-dimensional wave equation and wave characteristics – wave

theories – Small amplitude waves – Finite amplitude waves – Stokian, Solitary and Cnoidal wave theories

– Water particle kinematics – wave energy, power – wave deformation – Reflection, Refraction,

Diffraction Breaking of waves – Wave Forecasting Methods – Spectral description of Ocean Waves –

Design wave.

Currents : Classification – Behaviour – Design Criteria, Scour and other effects of currents.

Forces : Wave forces – Morison equation – Wave loads on vertical, inclined and horizontal cylinders.

Diffraction theory – wave slamming and slapping. Model Experiments.

Lab : Measurement of wave properties such as L, H, T, C and Cg.

Text Books:

Dean, R.G. and Dalrymple, R.A., Water wave mechanics for Engineers and Scientists, Prentice-Hall,

Inc., Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey, 1994

Reference Books :

Sorenson, R.M., Basic Coastal Engineering, A Wiley Interscience Publication, New York, 1978.

Ship Motion and Control

Objectives

To enable the students to get basic knowledge on ship course keeping and course

changing, control devices, ship manoeuvring experimental methods, sea trials and statutory

requirements in ship manoeuvrability, behaviour of ships in ocean wave environment and different

methods of motion control.

Syllabus

Ship motions – co-ordinate systems, 6 dof, uncoupled and coupled equation of motion;

hydrodynamic coefficients; wave excitation – summary of wave theory, dispersion relation, wave

pressure, velocity, acceleration; encounter frequency; motion damping effects, magnification

and tuning factors. Ship responses in regular waves.

Marine environment – Irregular seaway representations, wave spectra; Ship in seaway and

dynamic effects – Linear superposition, response amplitudes operator, motions in irregular

waves, local and relative motions, green water effects, slamming, broaching, added resistance,

powering in waves; motion sickness.

Ship and floating system motion control – Control of roll – bilge keel, free surface tanks, U-tanks,

moving weight;, fin stabilisers, gyro, active-tank;, rudder stabilization; Control of pitch.

Sea-keeping performance and design aspects; factors affecting different modes of motion;

guidelines for design; Limiting motion criteria;

Ship controllability fundamentals – the control loop, motion stability, linear equations of motion,

stability indices; Stability and control in the horizontal and vertical planes; definitive manoeuvres

– turning tests, overshoot and zigzag tests, spiral and pullout tests, accelerating, stopping and

backing tests.

Control surface hydrodynamics – rudder geometry, aspect ratio, influence of fixed structures;

Control surface design – specification of requirements and constraints on rudder design, number

of rudders, type of rudder, rudder geometry, rudder stock; Influence of ship features on controls

fixed stability.

Experimental determination of hydrodynamic derivatives – straight line test, rotating arm

technique, planar motion mechanism; Numerical methods used in ship manoeuvring problems,

ship manoeuvring simulators; IMO Rules and Recommendations. Ship manoeuvring sea trials.

Se

Practicals :

  1. Calculation of free stream characteristics of rudder.
  2. Rudder design – dimensions, form, structure and system
  3. Estimation of hydrodynamic coefficients and RAOs using strip theory

Experiments:

  1. Straight line test in towing tank
  2. PMM tests in the towing tank
  3. Free running models tests in the basin
  4. Roll and heave damping coefficient estimation using free oscillation tests
  5. Ship and floating body motion response in regular waves

Text Books:

  1. Lewis,E.U, Principles of Naval Architecture, SNAME, New Jersey, U.S.A, 2010.
  2. Fossen, T.I, Guidance and Control of Marine Vehicles, John Wiley & Sons, 1999
  3. Molland,A.F and Turnock, S.R., Marine Rudders and Control Surfaces, Elsevier, 2007
  4. Lewandowski, E.M. The Dynamics of Marine Crafts – Seakeeping & Maneuvering, World

Scientific, 2004

Reference Books :

  1. Abkowitz,M.A.; Lectures on Ship Hydrodynamics – Steering and Manoeuverability, Danish

Technical Press, Copenhagen, Denmark, 1964

  1. Khac Duc Do and Jie Pan, Control of Ships and Underwater Vehicles , Springer, 2009
  2. Faltinsen, M.O. Hydrodynamics of High Speed Marine Vehicles, Cambridge Uty Press, 2005
  3. Newman J.N; ‘Marine Hydrodynamics’, MIT Press, USA, 1977

5. Newman J.N; ‘Theory of Ship Motions’, Advances in Applied Mechanics, Vol., 1980.

Vibration of Marine Structures & Acoustics

Objectives

To enable the students to get basic knowledge of structure dynamics of single degree of freedom,

Multi-degree of freedom, continuous system, and acoustics.

Syllabus

Analysis of single degree of freedom systems – Time & Frequency domain methods continuous

system – Modes of vibration – Natural and forced vibration – vibration of beams – Sources of

vibration – propeller excited, wave-induced and machinery – Random vibrations – Calculation

procedure for torsional vibration of propulsion systems – empirical methods.

Hull girder vibration.

Vibration and sound instrumentation – sound transmission and absorption – Acoustic materials –

Origin and nature of machinery noise and their control – Effect of noise on human behavior – Noise

limits and legislations.

Text Books:

  1. Anil Chopra, “Dynamics of Structure” Prentice Hall, New Jersey, 2006.
  2. R W Clough and J Penzien, “Dynamics of Structure” McGraw-Hill International Publication,

Singapore,1993.

  1. D E Newland, “Random Vibrations, Spectral and Wavelet analysis”, John Wiley & Sons, 1993

Reference Books:

  1. L D Lutes and S Sarkani, “Random Vibrations”, Elsevier Butterworth, Burlington, USA, 2004.

11. J L Humar, “Dynamics of structure”, CRC Press, London, 2012.

Course No. Course Title L T ExT Lab Home Cr Cat
OE3036 Maneuvering & control of Marine Vehicles 3 1 0 0 6 10 P
OE3046 Ship Structural Design 3 1 0 0 6 10 P
Free Elective - II 3 0 0 0 6 9 S
Free Elective - III 3 0 0 0 6 9 F
Free Elective - IV 3 0 0 0 6 9 F
Free Elective - V 3 0 0 0 6 9 F
OExxxx Honours Elective - I 3 0 0 0 6 9 HE
Total 15+3 2 0 0 36 56+9
Ship Design

Objectives

To enable the students to get knowledge in ship design categorization, ship design methods,

different stages of ship design, hull form design methods, ship main and auxiliary systems selection and

layout, safety considerations in ships, statutory rules and regulations applicable in ship design etc. and ship

design softwares.

Syllabus

Marine transportation and trade routes, ship categorization – dead-weight carrier, capacity

carrier, linear dimension ship; Service ships and offshore support vessels; Advanced marine

vehicles; Ship design requirements.

Ship design methods – design using basic type ships, design using coefficients, design using

iteration methods; design spiral; Ship parameters – displacement, displacement coefficient,

displacement equation, volume equation, solution of the cubic equation; Ship dimensions, hull

form, form coefficients; Mass estimation – lightship mass – steel mass, outfit mass, engine plant

mass; dead weight.

Design of hull form – conventional method of lines, distortion of existing forms; stem and stern

contours, bulbous bow.; General arrangement – Subdivision of the ship’s hull and erections,

arrangement of spaces, arrangement of tanks, superstructure and deckhouses, arrangement of

engine plants, cargo handling capacity, hold capacity and stowage factor.

Effect of form on Ship’s performance: Freeboard and load line regulation; Stability – stability

booklet, IMO Regulations, Checks on stability, trim; Watertight integrity; damage stability,

Behaviour of ships in sea, resistance, powering, propulsion

Cargo handling equipments, cargo hatches; Anchoring and mooring systems; Accommodation

requirements, layout and design. Access equipments –hatches, manholes, doors, other closing

& opening devices, load line rules, gang ways and ladders; LSA and FFA; Steering gear

systems, navigational systems.

Tender specification; Economic considerations in ship design and building; Operational

economics; Introduction to ship design softwares.

Practicals:

  1. Computer-Aided ship design – owner’s requirement of ship (given), design of main

dimensions, design of form, weight estimation, hydrostatics, checks on stability, trim,

capacity, general arrangement, etc.

  1. Practicals on softwares dealing with basic ship calculations and ship design.

Text books:

  1. D.G.M.Watson, “Practical Ship Design”, Elsevier (2002)
  2. Thomas Lamb, “Ship Design and Construction”, SNAME (2003)
  3. Apostolos Papanikolaou, Ship Design: Methodologies of preliminary design, , SNAME,

2014.

Reference books:

  1. Schneekluth, H; Ship Design for Efficiency and Economy, Butterworths, 1987
  2. Taggart; Ship Design and Construction, SNAME, 1980.
  3. Indra Nath Bose, Energy Efficiency and Ships, SNAME, 2012..

4. Antony F Molland, A Guide to ship design, construction and operation, SNAME, 2008.

Course No. Course Title L T ExT Lab Home Cr Cat
OE3026 Shipyard Training (Summer) 0 0 0 0 6 6 P
Ship Design

Objectives

To enable the students to get exposed to actual ship building activities and learn all the industry practice in designing and fabrication of a ship

Syllabus

As per industry requirements in concurrence with one faculty advisor

Course No. Course Title L T ExT Lab Home Cr Cat
OExxxx Professional Elective - I 3 0 0 0 6 9 P
OE4050 *Project or Professional Elec - II 3 0 0 0 6 9 P
Free Elective - VI 3 0 0 0 6 9 F
Free Elective - VII 3 0 0 0 6 9 F
Honours Elective - II 3 0 0 0 6 9
Total 15+3 1 0 0 30+6 36+9
Professional Ethics 2 0 0 0 0 0
Course No. Course Title L T ExT Lab Home Cr Cat
HSxxxx Humanities Elective - III 3 0 0 0 6 9 H
*Project or Professional Elective - III 3 0 0 0 6 9 P
*Project or Professional Elective - IV 3 0 0 0 6 9 P
Free Elective - VIII 3 0 0 0 6 9 F
Honours Elective - III 3 0 0 0 6 9
Total 12 0 0 0 24 36+9
No Title L T Ext Lab Home Cr
ELECTIVE (A) - Mathematics
MA2010 Complex Variables 3 0 0 0 6 9
MA2030 Differential Equations 3 0 0 0 6 9
MA2040 Probability, Stochastic Process &Statisics 3 0 0 0 6 9
MA2060 Discrete Mathematics 3 0 0 0 6 9
MA2130 Basic Graph Theory 3 0 0 0 6 9
ELECTIVE (E) – Professional / Free for NA&OE (BTech&DD)
ME3350 Design of Machine Elements 3 0 0 0 6 9
MM3012 Joining and NDT Lab 3 0 0 0 6 9
MM3060 Metal Joining Technology 3 0 0 0 6 9
MM5320 Corrosion Engineering 3 0 0 0 6 9
MM5750 Welding Application Technology 3 0 0 0 6 9
OE4300 Ocean Energy 3 0 0 0 6 9
OE4400 Drilling vessels and Support Crafts 3 0 0 0 6 9
OE4600 Advance ship Hydrodynamics 3 0 0 0 6 9
OE4xxx Shipbuilding Material & Production Processes 3 0 0 0 6 9
OE5011 Marine Robotics 3 0 0 0 6 9
OE5080 Marine Instrumentation 3 0 0 0 6 9
OE5170 Ocean Acoustics 3 0 0 0 6 9
OE5230 Foundation of Offshore Structures 3 0 0 0 6 9
OE5310 Guidance and control of Marine Vehicles 3 0 0 0 6 9
OE5320 Nonlinear Problems in Ocean Engineering 3 0 0 0 6 9
OE5330 Advanced Marine Structures 3 0 0 0 6 9
OE5xxx Advanced Structural Analysis Of Marine Vehicles 3 0 0 0 6 9
OE5xxx Design Of Fishing Vessels 3 0 0 0 6 9
OE5xxx Design Of Ship Outfit Systems 3 0 0 0 6 9
OE5xxx Design Of Submarine And Submersible 3 0 0 0 6 9
OE5xxx Marine Corrosion, Prevention And Control 3 0 0 0 6 9
OE4xxx Ship Electrical And Electronic Systems 3 0 0 0 6 9
OE4xxx Ship Positioning Systems 3 0 0 0 6 9
OE5xxx Design Of High Speed Vessels 3 0 0 0 6 9
OE5xxx Warship Design 3 0 0 0 6 9
OE4xxx Analysis And Design Tools In Marine Hydrodynamics 3 0 0 0 6 9
OE4xxx Laboratory Modelling In Marine Hydrodynamics 3 0 0 0 6 9
OE5xxx Design, Construction and Operation of LNG Carriers and Terminals 3 0 0 0 6 9
OE5450 Numerical Techniques in Ocean Hydrodynamics 3 0 0 0 6 9
OE5500 FEM Applied to Ocean Engineering 3 0 0 0 6 9
OE5600 Advanced Wave Dynamics 3 0 0 0 6 9
OE5800 Coastal Engineering 3 0 0 0 6 9
OE6005 Reliability of Offshore Structures 3 0 0 0 6 9
OE6020 Mesh-free Methods Applied to Hydrodynamics 3 0 0 0 6 9
OE6200 Design of Offshore Structures 3 0 0 0 6 9
OE6300 Plated Structures and Shells 3 0 0 0 6 9
OE6930 Modeling of Offshore and Coastal Processes 3 0 0 0 6 9
OE6980 Computer Aided Surface Development of Marine 3 0 0 0 6 9
OE6990 Advanced Marine Vehicles 3 0 0 0 6 9
PE6060 HSE Management in Petroleum and Offshore Engineering 3 0 0 0 6 9
Design of Ocean Structures

Objectives

To make the students understand the basic principles of design of ocean structures. The course will cover the wide areas such as coastal structures (breakwaters, jetties, ports and harbours) and offshore structures (fixed platforms, floating structures) and the wave-structure interaction.

Syllabus

Coastal Structures:

Design principles of breakwater, seawall, groynes, berthing structures, quaywalls and open sea jetty, breasting and mooring dolphins; Dry Docks, Slipways; Code Provisions : IS 4651, IS 2911 and BS 6349

Offshore Structures:

Concepts and design principles of jacket and topside structures, Tension Leg Platforms, Spar Structures, Jackups and FPSO’s; Concepts and design of foundation for offshore structures; Code Provisions : API RP 2A and API RP 2T

Text Books:

1.Coastal Hydrualics by A.M.M. Wood and C.A. Fleming, Macmillan Press Limited, 1981.

2.Coastal Engineering by K. Horikawa, University of Tokyo Press, 1978

3.Design and Construction of Port and Marine Structures by A. D. Quinn, McGraw-Hill Book Company

4.Port Design – Guidelines and recommendations by C. A. Thoresen, Tapir Publications

5.Design of Marine Facilities for the Berthing, Mooring and Repair of Vessels by J. W. Gaythwaite, Van Nostrand;

Reference Books:

Handbook of Offshore Engineering by S.K. Chakrabarti, Elseviers, 2005.

Ocean Energy

Objectives

In the world’s present scenario, there is a need for exploring alternative energy sources especially renewable sources like ocean energy. This course will throw light into ocean energy and extraction principles and, create an interest to contribute for the successful extraction of energy from the Ocean in the future.

Syllabus

Generation of waves – Wave theories – Tidal waves – Energy from oceans – Tides, Waves, Currents, Salinity and thermal gradients with special reference to Indian coast – Energy converters for extraction of ocean energy – Design principles of wave power, tidal power and OTEC systems –Cost–benefit analysis.

Advance ship Hydrodynamics

Objectives

The objective of the course is to introduce advanced theoretical and numerical methods of hydrodynamics needed to determine the resistance and motion characteristics of marine vehicles.

Syllabus

  1. Introduction. Review of basic hydrodynamics, wave mechanics and complexities of practical Ship Hydrodynamics problems.
  2. Navier-Stokes Equation: Formulation and derivation of ship hydrodynamics in real fluids. Some exact solutions including of impulsively started plate. Boundary-Layer theory. Blasius solution. Friction lines of ships.
  3. Computational Fluid Dynamics: Introduction to boundary-integral and finite-difference methods applied for ship hydrodynamics problems. Application of vortex-lattice and panel methods for lifting surface hydrodynamics.
  4. Approximate Methods: Slender body theory; Strip theory for determining ship motion in waves. Michell’s thin ship theory to determine wave resistance.
  5. Recent Advances: Discussion of recent developments and frontier problems in Ship Hydrodynamic

Reference Books and Notes:

  1. Class and lecture notes
  1. N. Newman, “Marine Hydrodynamics,” MIT Press.
  1. M. Faltinsen, Hydrodynamics of High-Speed Marine Vehicles, Cambridge University Press
  1. Select journal articles in ship hydrodynamics.
Shipbuilding Material & Production Processes

Objectives

To introduce B.Tech/ M.Tech (Dual Degree) students to the building blocks and principles in the area of ship production and to seed the plants of research and design in their minds. The proposed topics have been arranged with help of experts from shipyard and well known academicians.

Syllabus

Materials (Steel, Aluminum and Composites), Introduction to Marine Corrosion and Control; Painting schemes.

Shipyard layout; Steel stockyard and material; Material preparation – straightening of plates and rolled sections, shot/sand blasting, priming; Fabrication of component parts.

Block assembly processes, Metal cutting processes, Bending of rolled and built up sections; Plate bending. Line heating. Line heating and welding methods, standards, symbols. Sub-assemblies: web frames, machine foundations etc.;

Product standardization and work simplification; Piping, framing, cabling, ventilation, foundation, and accommodation; Painting; Insulation; Product work breakdown and integrated zone engineering;

Prefabrication of panels, panel production line, Assembly of flat and corrugated sections, flat sections with curvature – assembly jigs; Pre-assembly of volume units – double bottom sections–side tank units–structural arrangement; Preassembly of the fore and aft end structure; superstructures.

Erection of ship hull, Auxiliary devices; Deformation of the ship’s hull; Quality control (X-ray tests etc); Scaffolding, Manufacturing Shop floor planning, Activities in shipyard pipe, machine and shipwrights shops. Launching – General methods, Launching by floating off, slipway launching – stern launching, side launching;

Linear programming concepts; Network analysis; Scheduling and resource allocation; Relational Database Management System (RDBMS) in production planning and control; Operations management principles and methods, Applications to the production of complex marine systems such as ships, offshore structures, and yachts.

Tutorials: Planning and scheduling in Matlab, RDBMS in MS-Access; computations in Ms-Excel, Shell expansion drawing, plate nesting, docking plan, launching calculations.

Text books:

[1] George J. Bruce, David J. Eyres (2012), “Ship Construction”, Butterworth-Heinemann, 7th edition.

[2] Ben C. Gerwick Jr. (2007), “Construction of Marine and Offshore Structures”, CRC Press, 3rd edition.

[3] Robert Taggart (1980), “Ship Design and Construction”, SNAME, USA.

[4] L. N. Aggarwal, K. C. Jain (2014), “Production Planning Control & Industrial Management”, Khanna Publishers, India.

Reference books

[1] Richard L. Storch, Colin P. Hammon, Howard M. Bunch (1988), “Ship Production”, Cornell Maritime Pr/Tidewater Publication, 1st edition.

[2] John Letcher, J. Randolph Paulling (2010), “The Principles of Naval Architecture Series: The Geometry of Ships”, SNAME, USA.

Marine Instrumentation

Objectives

This course focuses on the principles of ocean instrumentation. All instruments consist of the following stages: transduction, signal conditioning, and data observation/analysis. This course describes these principles by using specific instruments such as SONAR, Conductivity Temperature Depth (CTD) profilers, current measurements, Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers (ADCP). In addition to this the course also discusses data analysis for the different measurements recorded by the instruments.

Syllabus

Dynamic response of measuring instruments (with examples), Acoustic instruments and transducers, CTD construction and operation, Expendable ocean instruments, current profilers, and strain gauges, Acoustic positioning systems. Sampling, Spectral Analysis, Basic Filtering, Measuring system response using spectral analysis (magnitude and phase response).

Textbook and Reference Materials

  1. “Mechanical Measurements,” by Thomas G. Beckwith, Roy D. Marangoni, and John H. Lienhard V, 6th Edition, 2009 ISBN 9780122274305 published by Prentice Hall
  2. James Irish, and Albert Williams III. 2.693 “Principles of Oceanographic Instrument Systems – Sensors and Measurements (13.998)”, Spring 2004. (Massachusetts Institute of Technology: MIT OpenCourseWare), http://ocw.mit.edu (Accessed 30 Jan, 2015). License: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA
  3. “Encyclopedia of OceanSciences” 2nd Edition Six Volumes set, 2009ISBN9780122274305 published by Academic Press
Ocean Acoustics

Objectives

The objective of the course is to introduce principles and properties of underwater acoustics through formulation and analysis of transmission, reflection, absorption, attenuation of sound waves in the ocean including boundary and stratification effects.

Syllabus

  1. Introduction. Physical properties of sea water. Effects of density, salinity and temperature on sound speed. Underwater sound channels (USC). Surface and bottom effects. Ambient noise.
  2. Sound Propagation: Wave equation;Helmholtz equation; Lighthill’s acoustic analogy; Point source and plane wave solutions; Refraction of sound waves; Snell’s Law; Caustics and shadow zones; Ray theory.
  • Reflection and Transmission: Changes at an interface between to immiscible liquids. Transmission of sound from air to water and vice versa; Reflection from ocean bottom; Propagation of sound in shallow water.
  1. Sound propagation in Underwater Sound Channel (USC): Ray theory for USC; Munk’s model; Acoustic field as sum of normal modes; Analysis based on a parabolic equation,
  2. Scattering of Sound: Scattering at rough boundary surfaces; Method of small perturbation (MSP); Scattering of sound by surface waves and internal waves.
  3. Sound Radiation: Generation of sound by marine vehicles and offshore platforms.

Acoustics Applications: Remote sensing; Underwater communication; Sonar principle and use; Acoustic tomography; Geophysical seismic exploration.

Reference Books and Notes:

  1. M. Brekhovskikh and Yu. P. Lysanov, “Fundamentals of Ocean Acoustics,” Springer Series on Wave Phenomena (Edited by L.B. Felsen), Springer-Verlag, 1982.
  2. Kinsler, Frey, Coppens and Sanders, “Fundamentals of Acoustics”, 4th edition, 1999.
  3. Class and lecture notes
Advanced Marine Structures

Objectives

The course will give a brief overview of Ultimate load design principles and plastic capacity of sections Capacity estimate of tubular joints under axial, flexural and torsional buckling will be discussed. Fundamentals of impact analysis and its application to collision problems on marine structures will be also highlighted. A brief section on fluid-structure interaction highlighting flow induced vibration will be presented. Introductory topics on reliability of marine structures including FOSM and AFSOM methods will be also discussed. Concepts of fatigue analysis and design of marine structures will be presented. The focus is on detailed explanation of topics through numerical examples.

Syllabus

Module 1: Ultimate load design: Principles and factors affecting the strength. Fundamentals of plastic analysis of sections- estimate of plastic capacity of beams and frames- application to marine structures. Theories of failure- Capacity estimate of tubular joints under axial, flexural and torsional buckling-design examples. Fundamentals of impact analysis

Module 2: Fluid-structure interaction- elements of flow-induced vibration- Flow through perforated members

Module 3: Introduction to reliability of marine structures- Reliability concepts and methods- FOSM and AFSOM methods

Module 4: Fatigue and fracture- fatigue failure- cumulative fatigue damage models- fatigue analysis and design of marine structures-spectral fatigue damage

Text Books

  1. Arvid Naess and Torgeir Moan. 2013. Stochastic dynamics of marine structures, Cambridge University Press, New York, USA.
  2. Chaudhary, G.K and Dover, W.D. 1985. Fatigue analysis of offshore platforms subjected to sea wave loading, Int. J. Fatigue, 7.
  3. Gerwick, B.C.Jr. 1986. Construction of Offshore Structures: John Wiley, New York.
  4. Haldar, A., and Mahadevan, S. 2000. Probability, reliability and statistical methods in engineering design. John Wiley and Sons, New York.
  5. Hsu, H.T. 1981. Applied Offshore Structural Engineering: Gulf Publishing Co., Houston.
  6. Melchers RE. (1999). Structural reliability: analysis and prediction, 2nd Edition, John Wiley.
  7. Papoulis, A. and Pillai, SU (1991). Probability, random variables and stochastic processes, 3rd Edition, McGraw-Hill, New York.
  8. Srinivasan Chandrasekaran. 2015a. Dynamic analysis and design of ocean structures. Springer, INDIA, ISBN: 978-81-322-2276-7.
  9. Srinivasan Chandrasekaran. 2015b. Advanced Marine structures, CRC Press, Florida (USA), ISBN 9781498739689.
  10. Srinivasan Chandrasekaran. 2016. Offshore structural engineering: Reliability and Risk Assessment. CRC Press, Florida, ISBN:978-14-987-6519-0.
  11. Srinivasan Chandrasekaran and A.K.Jain. 2016. Ocean structures: Construction, Materials and Operations, CRC Press, Florida, ISBN: 978-14-987-9742-9.
  12. Throft-Christensen, P. and Baker,M. (1982). Structural reliability theory and applications, Springer Verlag, Berlin.
  13. Wirsching, P., Palz K. Ortiz. 2006. Random vibration: Theory and Practice, Dover, NY.

Reference Books:

  1. Ang, AHS and Tang, WH. 1975. Probability concepts in engineering and design, Volume 1 – Basic concepts, John Wiley, NY
  2. Ang, AHS and Tang, WH. 1975. Probability concepts in engineering and design, Volume 2 – Basic concepts, John Wiley, NY
  3. ASTM E 1049-85. 2005. Rain flow counting method, 1987.
  4. Benjamin, JR and Cornell, CA. 1970. Probability, statistics and decisions for civil engineers, John Wiley, New York.
  5. Chakrabarti, S. K. 1987. Hydrodynamics of Offshore Structures: Computational Mechanics.
  6. Chakrabarti, S. K. 1990. Non-linear method in offshore engineering, Elsevier Science Publisher, The Netherlands.
  7. Chakrabarti, S. K. 1994.Offshore Structure Modeling: World Scientific.
  8. Clauss, G. T. et al. 1992. Offshore Structures, Vol 1 – Conceptual Design and Hydromechanics: Springer, London.
  9. Dawson, T. H., 1983. Offshore Structural Engineering: Prentice-Hall Inc.
  10. Graff, W.J. 1981. Introduction to offshore structures: Design, fabrication and installation: Gulf Publishing Co, Tokyo.
  11. Graff, W.J. 1981. Introduction to Offshore Structures: Gulf Publishing Co., Houston.
  12. John S. Popovics, Jerzy Zemajtis and Iosif Shkolnik. 2008. Studies on static and dynamic modulus of elasticity, ACI-CRC report.
  13. Kam, J.C.P and Dover, W.D. 1989. Advanced tool for fast assessment of fatigue under offshore random wave stress hostory, INtn of Engrs, Part. 2, 87:539-556.
  14. Kam, J.C.P. and Dover, W.D. 1988. Fast fatigue assessment procedure for offshore structure under random time history, Proc. Institution of Civil Engineers, Part 2, 85:689-700.
  15. Love A.E.H. 1994. Mathematical theory of elasticity,, Dover publications Inc, NY.
  16. Madsen, HO, Krenk, S. and NC Lind, NC. (2006). Methods of structural safety, Dover.
  17. Mather, A. 2000. Offshore Engineering: an Introduction, 2nd edn: Witherby
  18. Matsuishi, M. and T. Endo. 1968. Fatigue of metals subjected to varying stresses, Japan Soc. of Mech. Engrs, Fukuoka, Japan, 3:37-40.
  19. Neviele, A. M. 1997. Properties of concrete, 4th Ed, JOhn Wiley & Sons, NY.
  20. Sadehi, K. 1989. Design and analysis of Marine structures: Khajeh Nasirroddin Tsi University of Technology, Tehran, Iran.
  21. Sarpkaya, T. and Isaacson, M. 1981. Mechanics of Wave Forces on Offshore Structures: Van Nostrand Reinhold.
  22. Srinivasan Chandrasekaran and Subrata Kumar Bhattacharyya. 2012. Analysis and Design of Offshore Structures with illustrated examples. Human Resource Development Center for Offshore and Plant Engineering (HOPE Center), Changwon National University Press, Republic of Korea ISBN: 978-89-963915-5-5.

Srinivasan Chandrasekaran. 2014. Advanced Theory on Offshore Plant FEED Engineering, Changwon National University, Republic of South Korea, pp. 237. ISBN:978-89-969792-8-9

Numerical Techniques in Ocean Hydrodynamics

Objectives

This course is aimed at capability building in students in hydrodyamic computation and code development using traditional and contemporary models. Students are required to carry out a number of basic numerical and advanced hydrodynamic formulations and code development

Syllabus

Revisit Fluid Dynamics fundamentals. Numerical solution of Diffusion, Advection and Burgers’ equations . Requirements of numerical solutions – Lax theorem; linear stability analysis. Introduction to CFD concepts: Pressure elimination, Pressure correction and Split algorithms; modeling of turbulence; introduction to LES, DES and DNS. Computations in solution of PDEs, Pressure elimination and Pressure correction. Introduction to computations using unstructured meshes.
Introduction to Numerical Marine Hydrodynamics: Partial differential equations of inviscid hydrodynamics; Code development and computations of hydrodynamics of wave-structure interaction for fixed and floating bodies using BIEM, BEM and FEM techniques; Application of Fast methods; Time domain computation – non-linear velocity potential and acceleration potential approaches. Free surface computation in viscous models – VOF and Levelset. Computation of the motions of ships in waves. Forward speed problem and computation. Integral boundary layer equations and numerical solutions.
Introduction to Parallel Machines and High Performance Computing.
Text Books: NIL
Reference Books: Anderson, D. Computational Fluid Dynamics, McGraw Hill International Editions, 1995. Tannehill, C., Anderson, D and Pletcher, R. Computational Fluid Mechanics and Heat Transfer, 1997. Newman, JN. Marine Hydrodynamics, MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, 1977. Journal and thesis publications and prescribed by teacher.

FEM Applied to Ocean Engineering

Objectives

To familiarize the application of FE techniques in the field of Ocean Hydrodynamics with emphasis on all key elements of the method.

Syllabus

Introduction – Different approaches to finite element formulation – Different types of element and interpolation functions, Lagrange & Hermite Polynomials, natural co-ordinates – Derivation of element property matrices – Assembly – solution of finite element equations – Structural and geotechnical problems – Nonlinear analysis.

Application to fluid mechanics problems, Fluid-structure interaction – Diffraction of waves, 2D formulation using mild – slope equation – use of infinite elements – Added mass and damping matrices for floating bodies, 2D formulation – Harbour resonance, Liquid sloshing – Vibrations of underwater structures

Introduction to Particle based methods/ Lattice Boltzmann Method.

Text Books:

  • N. Reddy. 1984. An Introduction to the finite element method. McGraw Hill. (third edition, 2005)
  • C. Zienkiewicz, R.W. Lewis and K.G. Stagg (eds.) 1978. Numerical methods in Offshore Engineering. Wiley.

Reference Books:

  • D. Cook. 1981. Concepts and applications of finite element analysis. Wiley.
  • C. Zienkiewicz. 1977. The Finite Element Method. McGraw Hill. (vol.I, II, III)
  • J. Bathe. 1981. FE procedures in Engineering Analysis.
Advanced Wave Dynamics

Objectives

Syllabus

Coastal Engineering

Objectives

To cover the behavior of waves and sediments in the near shore region and their application to coastal Engineering practice with a few case studies.

Syllabus

Waves in shallow waters – Shoaling, refraction, diffraction and breaking– Interaction currents and waves- near shore currents-wave run-up and overtopping- coastal sediment characteristics- Initiation of sediment motion under waves- Radiation stress-wave set-up and wave set- down- mechanics of coastal sediment transport – Limits for littoral drift – Suspended and Bed Load – alongshore sediment transport rate – Distribution of alongshore currents and Sediment transport rates in Surf zone. Physical modeling in Coastal Engineering. Onshore offshore sediment transport – Stability of tidal inlets- Coastal features – Beach Features – Beach cycles – Beach Stability – Beach profiles -Coastal erosion, Planning and methods of coast protection works – Design of shore defense structures – Non-breaking and breaking wave forces on coastal structures -Breakwaters- Classification, Design and application in coastal protection and harbor planning- Case studies on coastal erosion and protection-Generation, propagation and effect of tsunami.

Text Books:

Horikawa,K., Coastal Engineering, University of Tokyo press, 1978

Sorenson, R.M., Basic Coastal Engineering, A Wiley-Interscience Publication, New York, 1978

Kamphius,J.W. Introduction to coastal Engineering and Management, Advances on Ocean Engineering-Volume 16, World Scientific,2002.

References:

Reeve,D., Chadwick, A. and Fleming, C. Coastal Engineering-Processes, theory and design practice, Spon Press, Taylor & Francis Group, London & Paris,2004

Silvester,R. and Hsu,J.R.C. Coastal Stabilisation, Advances on Ocean Engineering-Volume 14, World Scientific, 1997.

Coastal Engineering Manual, U.S.Army Corps of Engineers, Washington, DC 20314-1000,, Vol. 1 to 3, July 2003.

Wood,M., Coastal Hydraulics: Mcmillan, Civil Engineering Hydraulics, London, 1969

Decisions.” CIFE Technical Report (177), Stanford University, Stanford.

Reliability of Offshore Structures

Objectives

Syllabus

Mesh-free Methods Applied to Hydrodynamics

Objectives

To introduce the students to Meshfree or particle Methods and to show them that there are alternatives to the Mesh based Methods, which are currently being used by the numerical modeling group worldwide.

Syllabus

Numerical modelling; Basics of fluid mechanics; NS – Eulerian and Lagrangian Formulations; Free surface and Body boundary conditions; Time split algorithms; Strong and Weak forms; Weighted Residual methods.

Overview of mesh based methods and meshfree methods; Basic techniques; Categories of meshfree methods; shape function constructions – Issues; SPH; Point Interpolations; Moving least square method; Shepard Functions; Error estimations; Support domain and Influence domain; Weight functions; Meshfree Integrations; Computational Cost; Conservation and Convergence.

Meshfree methods based on Global weak form – EFG; Meshfree methods based on Local weak form – MLPG; Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics; Moving Particle Semi-Implicit method; Essential Boundary conditions – Issues; Turbulence – Sub-particle scale; Meshfree methods applied to fluid dynamics problem; Matrix formulations and solution methods in meshfree methods; application to floating bodies, coastal engineering.

Text Books:

[1] G.R. Liu (2006), “Mesh free methods: Moving beyond the finite element method”, CRC Press, Taylor and Francis, US.

Reference Books:

[1] J. Anderson (1995), “Computational Fluid Dynamics: The basics with applications”, McGraw-Hill, USA.

[2] Li H and Mulay SS (2013), “Meshless methods and their numerical properties”, CRC Press, Taylor and Francis, US.

[3] S.N. Atluri (2004), “The Meshless method (MLPG) for domain and BIE discretizations”, Tech Science Press.

[4] G.R. Liu and M.B. Liu (2003), “Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics”, World Scientific, Singapore. (also available as E-book)

Design of Offshore Structures

Syllabus

Loads on offshore structures

Wind Loads; Wave and Current Loads; Calculation based on Maximum base Shear and Overturning Moments; Design Wave heights and Spectral Definition; Hydrodynamic Coefficients and Marine Growth; Fatigue Load Definition and Joint Probability distribution; Seismic Loads;

Steel Tubular Member Design

Principles of WSD and LRFD; Allowable stresses and Partial Safety Factors; Tubular Members, Slenderness effects; Column Buckling, Design for combined axial and bending stresses (API RP 2A guidelines);

Tubular Joint Design for Static and Cyclic Loads

Simple tubular joints; stress concentration factors; S-N curves and fatigue damage calculations.

Jackup Rigs

Configuration and operation of jackups; Simplified analysis; Spudcan penetration and extraction; Spudcan – pile interaction; Design of jackup legs;

Design against Accidental Loads (Fire, Blast and Collision)

Behaviour of steel at elevated temperature; Fire Rating for Hydrocarbon fire; Design of structures for high temperature; Blast Mitigation-Blast walls; Collision of Boats and energy absorption; Platform survival capacity and Plastic design methods

Example tutorial problems on design of tubular members, Stress concentration factors, fatigue estimation, wave load on structures

Modeling of Offshore and Coastal Processes

Objectives

This computational lab based course provides hands on training on state of the art wave propagation, circulation and morphodynamic models.

Syllabus

Theories of wind – generated ocean waves – Wind-wave Modelling: Third generation Wind – Wave modelling: WAM, SWAN & STWAVE for wave hind-casting and forecasting.

Deformation of water waves: Solution of Helmholtz and Mild slope equations; Nearshore wave propagation in phase-averaging and phase-resolving models; Boussinesq wave model; applications to large bodies and harbours – computations in 2D; introduction to public domain and industry software.

Ocean hydrodynamics: Circulation with Tide, Temperature & Salinity; Turbulence in Ocean; Shallow Water Equations and their solution; applications to Nearshore circulation; Storm surge & Tsunami. Modelling of scalar transport and morphodynamics.

Text Books:

Dyke, P. Modeling Coastal and Offshore Processes. Imperial College Press, 2007.

Komen, G.J., Cavaleri, L., Donelan, M., Hasselmann, K., Hasselmann, S., Janssen, P.A.E.M. Dynamics and modeling of ocean waves, Cambridge university press, New York, 1994.

Nielsen, P. Coastal and Estuarine Processes, World Scientific, 2009.

Reference Books:

Mellor G.L., User Guide for a three-dimensional, primitive equation, numerical ocean model, 1998.

Computer Aided Surface Development of Marine

Objectives

In a structured manner, this course introduces the mathematics and programming implementation of geometric design that is needed to design smooth and fair curves, surfaces and volumes for engineering sciences – free form shapes.

Syllabus

Module 1: Introduction and classification of geometric modeling forms for curves, surfaces and volumes; differential geometry of curves and surfaces; introduction to spline curves; Bezier splines; Uniform/non-uniform Rational B-splines; and fitting, fairing and generalized cylinders.

Module 2: Introduction to blending surfaces; intersection problems in geometric design; offsets of parametric curves, surfaces and volumes; constructive solid geometry, boundary representation; decomposition models; and advanced topics in differential geometry.

Module 3: Object matching; finite element and boundary element meshing algorithms; robustness of geometric computations; introduction to interval methods; scientific visualization; variational geometry; tolerances; inspection methods; feature representation and recognition; and shape interrogation for design, analysis, and manufacturing.

Text books

[1] G. Farin (2001), Curves and Surfaces for CAGD: A Practical Guide, The Morgan Kaufmann Series in Computer Graphics, 5th edition, Morgan Kaufmann, USA.

[2] D. F. Rogers and J. A. Adams (1989), Mathematical Elements for Computer Graphics, 2nd edition, Tata McGraw-Hill, India.

Reference books

[1] K. K. Dube (2009), Differential Geometry and Tensors, I. K. International Publishing House PL, India.

[2] Q. Khan (2012), Differential Geometry of Manifolds, Prentice Hall India Learning Private Limited, India.

[3] N. M. Patrikalakis and T. Maekawa (2010), Shape Interrogation for Computer Aided Design and Manufacturing, Springer.

[4] D. Somasundaram (2008), Differential Geometry: A First Course, Narosa Book Distributors, India.

Advanced Marine Vehicles

Objectives

Enable the student to understand, characterize, evaluate resistance, powering and basic hydrodynamic behaviour of advance marine vehicle including warship and submarine

Syllabus

  1. An introduction in advanced marine vehicle (AMV) types.
  2. The basic principles of the different types of advanced marine vehicles will be explained, supported by data of recently build vessels.
  3. Hydrodynamic aspects, the contradiction between resistance and propulsion and on the other hand ships movements will be dealt with.
  4. Design strategies in the design of advanced marine vehicles.
  5. Several types of propulsion systems such as but not limited to water jets, cavitating and non cavitating propellers.
  6. Structural Aspects of AMVs
  7. An introduction to warship and Submarines
  8. Hydrostatic and hydrodynamic aspects of warship and Submarine.

Reference Books :

1.Thomas Lamp “Ship Design and Construction” Vol1 and Vol 2 published by SNAME

2.Liang Yun ” High Performance marine vessels” Springer publication3.PJ Gates “Surface Warship-An Introduction to design principles” 1987 Brassey’s Defence Publisher

3.PJ Gates “Surface Warship-An Introduction to design principles” 1987 Brassey’s Defence Publishers.

HSE Management in Petroleum and Offshore Engineering

Objectives

  • The course aims to introduce the post-graduate students the basics of oil and gas production systems which will mainly include artificial pumping systems for petroleum production and designing of surface production operations related to storage and processing of reservoir fluids.
  • The course aims to bridge knowledge gap of the students between Drilling and Well Completions and the Petroleum Production Operations.

Syllabus

Petroleum production system, Properties of oil and natural gas, Multi-phase flows in pipes, Inflow performance, Well deliverability, Forecast of well production, natural flow.
Design and analysis of artificial lift systems, selection procedure, pump classification, Sucker rod pump, pumping units, issues in sucker rod pumps, gas interference, Introduction to Electrical submersible pump, pump and motor assembly, gas separator, failure modes, Progressive cavity pump, metallic and non-metallic stator, Hydraulic pump, jet pump, Gas lift, Continuous and intermittent flow gas lift, gas lift valves, Plunger lift.
Reservoir fluid and produced water composition, fluid production system, sand production, three phase fluid separation, classification of separator, components of separator, design of separator, liquid level control, dehydration, demulsification and desalting of oil, produced water treatment, flow control and metering system, oil and gas storage, safety and control systems.

Text books:

  • Petroleum Production Engineering, B. Guo, WC Lyon and A gambhor, Elsevier, 2007.
  • Gas Well Deliquification, JF Lea, HV Nickens, MR Wells , Elsevier, 2008.
  • Standard handbook of Petroleum and Natural Gas Engineering, W.C. Lyons, Gulf publishing Company.
  • Surface production Operations, Volume 1&2, K Arnold and M Stewart, gulf Publishing Company.
  • Electric Submersible Pump, G. Takacs, Elsevier, 2008.
  • Hand Book for Electric Submersible Pump, Centrilift, 1997.
  • Progressive Cavity Pumps, Downhole Pumps, and Mud Motors, Lev Nelik, Gulf publishing company, TX, 2005.
  • Petroleum and Natural Gas Production Engineering, W.C. Lyons, Elsevier. 2010.
  • Gas Lift Manual, API, 1994.
  • The Technology of Artificial Lift Methods, K.E. Brown, Pennwell Books, Oklahama, 1980.
  • Petroleum Production Systems, Economides et al., Prenticehall, New jersey, 1994.
  • Production Optimization, H.D. Beggs, OGCI and Petroskills Publications, Tulsa-Oklahama, 2003.
Reference books:

Petroleum Engineering hand book, Vol VI. SPE, 2007.

B.Tech & M.Tech( Naval Architecture & Ocean Engineering)
Semester IWinterSemester IISummerSemester IIISemester IVSemester VSemester VISummerSemester VIISemester VIIISummerSemester IXSemester XElectives
Course No. Course Title L T ExT Lab Home Cr Cat
MA1101 Functions of Several Variables 3 1 0 0 6 10 S
PH1010 Physics I 3 1 0 0 6 10 S
AM1100 Engineering Mechanics 3 1 0 0 6 10 E
CS1100 Introduction to Programming 3 0 0 3 6 12 E
ME1100 Thermodynamics 3 1 0 0 6 10 E
OE1101 Introduction to Naval Architecture & Ocean Engineering 2 0 0 0 4 6 P
Total 17 4 0 3 34 58
NCC/NSS 0 0 0 0 2 0
LIFE SKILLS 0 0 0 0 3 0
Introduction to Ocean Engineering

Objectives

Enable the student to understand and familiarize with Oceanography, marine vehicles and offshore structures

Syllabus

Offshore Structures for oil and gas: Fixed offshore platforms (jackets, gravity platforms, articulated towers); superstructure & foundation, floating platforms (semi-submersibles, jack-ups, TLPS, FPSOs, pipe laying barges); Mooring, station keeping, berthing systems for floating platforms; towing launching & installation of platforms, Nearshore structures.

Marine Vehicles: Oceangoing, ship types, types of small crafts, high speed crafts, vehicles for Inland water transport, special ship types, e.g. warships, icebreakers, types of propulsion systems, marine safety regulation, underwater vehicles and submersibles.

Physical Oceanography: Physical properties of seawater, Different types of ocean waves and their importance, tides, ocean currents, ocean circulation, ocean basin oscillations, Tsunamis, storm surge, Air-sea interaction.

Geological Oceanography: Features of ocean boundaries, geomorphology and structures of ocean floor, marine sediments & formation, types, distribution, marine mineral resources and their geophysical prospecting methods

 

Course No. Course Title L T ExT Lab Home Cr Cat
WS1010 Workshop I 0 0 0 3 0 3 E

 

Course No. Course Title L T ExT Lab Home Cr Cat
MA1102 Series and Matrices 3 1 0 0 6 10 S
PH1020 Physics II 3 1 0 0 6 10 S
PH1030 Physics Lab 0 0 0 3 1 4 S
CY1001 Chemistry I 3 1 0 0 6 10 S
CY1002 Chemistry Lab 0 0 0 3 0 3 S
HSxxxx Humanities Elective - I 3 0 0 0 6 9 H
OE1012 Ship Hydrostatics and Stability Theory 3 1 0 0 6 10 P
Total 15 4 0 6 31 56
NCC/NSS 0 0 0 0 3 0
Ship Theory

Objectives

Enable the student to understand ship geometry, hydrostatics parameters and their estimation, ship floatation stability, various operational effects on ship stability, ship capacity, damaged stability and launching calculations.

Syllabus

Lines plan and hull form coefficients – Hull forms of different types of ships and boats – Numerical techniques for ship calculations- Fluid pressure, centre of pressure – Weight estimation, centre of gravity, effect of shifting weights.

Lightship, deadweight, CG, CB – definitions – Conditions for equilibrium.

Metacentre, Hydrostatic particulars – definition and derivations.

Stability at small angles – heel, trim and angle of loll – Free surface effects – Inclining experiment – Stability at large angles – cross curves of stability – dynamic stability levers- Wind heeling moment, maximum allowable KG – Stability of grounded vessels – Submarine stability – Stability criterion for various types of crafts.

Capacity and tonnage calculations – Trim and stability booklet – Freeboard – Flooding of ships, subdivision and damage stability – Launching – Approximate method of calculation for hydrostatic particulars – data and references.

 

Course No. Course Title L T ExT Lab Home Cr Cat
WS1010 Workshop I 0 0 0 3 0 3 E

 

Course No. Course Title L T ExT Lab Home Cr Cat
MA Mathematics Elective-I 3 0 0 0 6 9 S
EE1100 Basic Electrical Engg. 3 1 0 0 6 10 E
HSxxxx Humanities Elective - II 3 0 0 0 6 9 H
OE2044 Ship Hydrodynamics 3 1 0 0 6 10 P
AM2200 Strength of Materials 3 1 0 0 6 10 P
OE2013 Ship Drawing and Calculations 1 3 0 3 3 10 P
OE2023 Marine Instrumentation Lab 0 0 0 2 0 2 P
Total 16 6 0 5 33 60
Ecology & Environment 2 0 0 0 0 0
Ship Drawing and Calculations

Objectives

To enable the students to get knowledge on basic engineering and ship drawings and ship

calculations, practical knowledge in the use of various naval architecture software.

Syllabus

Introduction to basic engineering drawing. Construction of plane curves. Coordinate system projection

of lines and planes. Projection of right regular solids. Section and intersection of

solids and development of surfaces; Systems of projections – principles, conventions and

applications of orthographic and isometric projections. Dimensioning principles and conventional

representations.

Drawing and fairing of lines plan from supplied offset data; Calculations for hydrostatics,

generation of table of offsets, stability calculation,

Introduction to ship design software.

Marine Instrumentation Lab

Objectives

Enable students to get work with basic instruments used in hydrodynamic and structural experiments.

Syllabus

Basics of instrumentation systems

Working principles of different transducers and their calibration : Strain gauges, Potentiometers,

LVDT, Velocity probes, Inclinometers, Accelerometers, Pressure transducers, Wave probes,

Load cells. Introduction to signal conditioning and data acquisition, and sources of errors in

instrumentation systems.

Reference Books :

  1. Instrumentation lab manual
  2. Beckwith,T.G., Marangoni, R.D. and Lienhard, J.H., Mechanical Measurements, Addison

Wesley, USA, 1993

3. Collacot, R.A., Structural Integrity Monitoring, Chapman and Hall, London, 1985

Course No. Course Title L T ExT Lab Home Cr Cat
MA Mathematics Elective - II 3 0 0 0 6 9 S
BT1010 Life Sciences 3 0 0 0 6 9 S
OE2014 Marine Engineering 3 1 0 0 6 10 P
OE2024 Analysis of Structures 3 1 0 0 6 10 P
OE2034 Ship Resistance and Propulsion 3 1 0 1 6 11 P
OE2044 Ocean Wave Hydrodynamics 3 1 0 1 6 10 P
Total 18 4 0 1 36 59
Marine Engineering

Objectives

  • The students will gain the understanding of marine engineering
  • To design a shipping machinery, they will be able to identify space and requirement of the machinery

The will have clear understanding the know-how of the machinery

Syllabus

Introduction to marine machinery -Types of marine power systems-Engine room layout -Marine diesel engines and their cycles, Fuels Super charging, Ignition and combustion problems-Fuel oil, lubricating oil-Compressed air cooling water systems.

Turbines, pumps, their types and characteristics, cavitation etc.

Marine boilers, Composite boilers-Exhaust gas and heat exchangers-Economizers, Super heaters.

Auxiliary machineries-Choice of power systems for ships.

Fire fighting, Navigational aids, Steering gear, shafting, stern tubes and transmission system.

TEXT BOOKS:

  1. Harrington,R.L. Marine Engineering, SNAME,New York (1992)

2.Taylor,D.A.,Introduction to Marine Engineering,Butterworths,London(1983)

  1. Woodward, J.B.,Low Speed Marine Diesel,Ocean Engineering,A Wiley series(1981)
  1. Any standard text books on thermodynamics
Analysis of Structures

Objectives

To enable the students to get basic knowledge on fundamental concept of structural analysis based

on matrix and finite element technique which can help in understanding ocean structures.

Syllabus

Work and energy theorems, Reciprocal theorem, Analysis of indeterminate frames and trusses, Unit load and

conjugate beam methods, introduction to Influence lines diagram, Strain energy of beams, bars and torsion

members, Matrix formulation of displacement method for frame, truss, bar and torsion members, Beam on

elastic foundation and its stiffness matrix, 3D beam element, Transformation, assembly of stiffness matrices.

Beam-column theory, Geometric stiffness matrix, Buckling of bars and frames, Introduction to finite element

method with application to buckling

2D and 3D theory of elasticity, Equilibrium and compatibility equations in cartesian and polar coordinates,

Strain-displacement relations, Plane stress and plane strain, Use of stress function in 2D problems.

Application of matrix methods to problems of marine structures.

Text Books:

  1. L S Srinath, “Advance Mechanics of Solid”, Tata McGraw Hill. New Delhi, 2003
  2. F Guarracino and A Walker, “Energy Methods in Structural Mechanics”, Thomas Telford Publishing,

London, 1999.

  1. Madhulit Mukhopadhyay, Abdul Hamid Sheikh, “Matrix and Finite Element Analysis of Structure”, Ane

Books Pvt Ltd, New Delhi., 2009.

Reference Books:

  1. R D Cook, D S Malkus and M E Plesha, “Concepts and applications of Finite Element Analysis”, John

Wiley & Sons, 1988

  1. D Menon, “Structural analysis”, Narosa, New Delhi, 2010.
  1. D Menon, “Advance Structural analysis”, Narosa, New Delhi, 2010
Ship Resistance and Propulsion

Objectives

To enable the students to get basic knowledge on ship resistance components, ship

power estimation methods, ship propulsion systems, propeller design methods, ship model tests for

the determination of ship resistance, ship propeller model tests and application to ship design.

Syllabus

Components of resistance; Form factor; Wave making resistance – ship wave systems,

interference effects, theoretical calculation of wave making resistance, wave breaking

resistance, bulbous bows and their effects.

Dimensional analysis – laws of comparison – geometrical, dynamical and kinematical similarity,

Newton’s, Froude’s and Reynold’s laws, model-ship correlation; Model testing – tank testing

facilities, testing, prediction of resistance from model tests, extrapolation (ITTC 78), Froude’s

concept, laminar influence and tank wall effect, comparison of resistance prediction with results

of full scale trials.

Air and wind resistance, resistance of appendages, added resistance in waves; Resistance in

restricted waterways – resistance in shallow water, resistance in canals; Determination of

resistance from series test results; Resistance of planing crafts, multi-hull vessels, hovercrafts,

hydrofoils, SES.

Introduction to different propulsion systems in ships; Screw propeller-screw propeller geometry,

sections, propeller drawing; Propeller theories – momentum theory, blade element theory,

circulation theory.

Interaction between hull and propeller- wake and wake fraction; thrust deduction factor,

propulsive efficiency in open water and behind conditions, hull efficiency, quasi propulsive

coefficient; Powering; Cavitation – types, cavitation number, effects of cavitation, prevention of

cavitation, design for minimum cavitation, cavitation tests.

Propeller design – propeller series, open water diagrams, design charts; Propeller design and

performance study using design charts; Engine selection; Propeller model tests – test facilities,

laws of comparison, open water test, self-propulsion test; Strength of propellers

Practicals:

  1. Resistance calculation using Guldhammer – Harvald series
  2. Shallow water resistance calculation
  3. Propeller design using series chart
  4. Propeller drawing ?

Experiments:

  1. Model test for ship resistance determination
  2. Flow-line test for identifying bilge keel position
  3. Propeller model open water test in towing tank
  4. Model test for wake fraction determination
  5. Self propulsion model test for thrust deduction fraction determination

Text Books:

  1. John Letcher, Randolph Paulling: Principles of Naval Architecture series-Ship Resistance

and flow, SNAME, U.S.A., 2009.

  1. Antony F Molland, Stephen R turnock, Ship resistance and propulsion-practical estimation of

propulsive power,2011.

  1. William Frederick Durand ; Resistance and Propulsion of Ships, Nabu Press, 2013.

Reference Books:

  1. Harvald S.A.; “Resistance and Propulsion of Ships”, John Wiley & Sons., 1983.
  2. Justin E Kerwin, Jacques B Halder:Principles of Naval Architecture series -Propulsion,

SNAME, New Jersey, 2010.

  1. John Carlton, Marine Propellers and propulsion, 2007.
  2. Baker George Stephen, Ship form, Resistance and screw propulsion, Hard press publishing,

2013.

  1. D.W. Taylor ; The Speed and Power of Ships ; A Manual of Marine Propulsion, Maritime

Press, 2013

  1. D. W. Taylor ; Resistance of Ships and Screw Propulsion, Unikum, 2012.
Ship Hydrodynamics

Objectives

To introduce students to different topics of fluid mechanics with emphasis on those having relevance to ship and ocean hydrodynamic applications.

Syllabus

Review: Continuity, Euler, Navier-Stokes (N-S) and Bernoulli equations; Divergence and Stokes

theorems; Potential flow and stream function; Elementary potential flows: parallel flow / source and

sink (2D & 3D) sink / vortex / doublet, flow over circular cylinder with and without circulation.

Role of compressibility; Vector and tensor forms of fluid dynamic equations; Common

nondimensional groups (Froude / Reynolds / Cavitation / Euler / Weber / Strouhal numbers); Stokes

law of viscosity for shear and normal stresses; Circulation and Stokes theorem (2D & 3D); Kelvin’s

circulation theorem and Helmholtz’s vorticity theorems; Vortex line and tube; Vorticity transport

equation, convection and diffusion of vorticity; Potential flow: Laplace equation in cylindrical and spherical coordinates, boundary conditions (rigid and oscillating body or surface, free surface etc.),

superposition of elementary flows, Rankine half and closed bodies etc., method of images, source

or vortex near wall; Kutta-Joukowski theorem and lift; D’Alembert’s paradox; Unsteady flow past

circular cylinder and sphere: added mass; Added mass tensor of rigid bodies in unbounded fluid,

its properties and symmetries; Munk moment; Cavitation; Boundary value problem of gravity waves

and its solution, dispersion and group velocity; Kelvin waves and wave resistance of thin ships.

Lifting surfaces; Foil section characterizations; Flow around a foil: generation of lift, Kutta condition;

Linearised lifting surface theory of thin 2D hydrofoil, thickness and camber problems and their

solutions, lift and moment coefficients.

N-S equations to Prandtl boundary layer (BL) equations by order of magnitude analysis; Dynamic

similarity and boundary conditions; Laminar flow, BL thickness, displacement and momentum

thicknesses; BL separation, bluff and streamlined bodies; Vortex shedding by cylinders, Karman

vortex street, role of Strouhal no.; Vortex induced vibration; Skin friction, BL along a flat plate at

zero incidence, its solution; Blasius formula; Plane Couette flow and Poiseuille flow; Impulsively

started plate; Momentum integral equation of BL; Characteristics of turbulent flow; Drag crisis in

circular cylinder and sphere; Friction due to turbulent BL over flat plate, power law, roughness

effect; N-S equations for mean time averaged quantities: RANS equations and role of CFD.

Applications of all the above in ship design and analysis.

Text Books:

  1. J.N.Newman, Marine Hydrodynamics, MIT Press, 1977
  2. O.M.Faltinsen, Hydrodynamics of High Speed marine Vehicles, Cambridge Uty Press, 2005
  3. V.Betram, Practical Ship Hydrodynamics, B&H, 2000

Reference Books :

  1. Principles of Naval Architecture, E. V. Lewis (Ed.), SNAME Publications, 1989
Course No. Course Title L T ExT Lab Home Cr Cat
OE3015 Ship Structural Analysis 3 1 0 0 6 10 P
OE3035 Motion of Ships & Floating Systems 3 0 0 1 6 10 P
OE3016 Ship Design 3 1 0 1 6 11 P
OE3045 Vibration of Marine Structures & Acoustics 3 0 0 0 6 9 P
OE3190 Design of Ocean Structures 3 0 0 0 6 9 F
Free Elective - I 3 0 0 0 6 9 F
Total 18 2 0 2 36 58
Ship Structures

Syllabus

Longitudinal strength-shear force and bending moment-still water and wave loads-deflectionsunsymmetrical

bending-bending stresses and design of midship section.

Shear flow analysis of multicell sections-Torsional analysis-Warping torsion-Determination of

shear and normal stresses-shear lag and effective breadth.

Bending of plates-stiffened, plates-orthotropic, plates-large deflection theories and applications.

Buckling and ultimate strengths of columns, plates and stiffened panels-concept of effective

width-ultimate strength of the hull guider.

Finite elements for simple plated structures-use of computer packages for the analysis of ship

structures.

Text Books:

  1. Hughes, O.E, Ship Structural Analysis and Design, SNAME , 2010
  2. Mansour, A. and Liu, D. Strength of Ships and Ocean Structures, PNA series, SNAME 2008

Reference Books :

  1. Jensen, J.J, Load and Global Responses of Ships, Elsevier, 2001
  1. Bai, Y. Marine Structural Design, Elsevier, 2003
Ocean Wave Hydrodynamics

Objectives

To impart B.Tech students with the knowledge on Waves and wave mechanics. Focus is on theoretical description of waves and their practical applications.

Syllabus

Review of Basic Fluid Mechanics: Conservation of mass and momentum, Euler Equations, Bernoulli’s

equation, velocity potential, stream function.

Waves: Classification of water waves – Two-dimensional wave equation and wave characteristics – wave

theories – Small amplitude waves – Finite amplitude waves – Stokian, Solitary and Cnoidal wave theories

– Water particle kinematics – wave energy, power – wave deformation – Reflection, Refraction,

Diffraction Breaking of waves – Wave Forecasting Methods – Spectral description of Ocean Waves –

Design wave.

Currents : Classification – Behaviour – Design Criteria, Scour and other effects of currents.

Forces : Wave forces – Morison equation – Wave loads on vertical, inclined and horizontal cylinders.

Diffraction theory – wave slamming and slapping. Model Experiments.

Lab : Measurement of wave properties such as L, H, T, C and Cg.

Text Books:

Dean, R.G. and Dalrymple, R.A., Water wave mechanics for Engineers and Scientists, Prentice-Hall,

Inc., Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey, 1994

Reference Books :

Sorenson, R.M., Basic Coastal Engineering, A Wiley Interscience Publication, New York, 1978.

Ship Motion and Control

Objectives

To enable the students to get basic knowledge on ship course keeping and course

changing, control devices, ship manoeuvring experimental methods, sea trials and statutory

requirements in ship manoeuvrability, behaviour of ships in ocean wave environment and different

methods of motion control.

Syllabus

Ship motions – co-ordinate systems, 6 dof, uncoupled and coupled equation of motion;

hydrodynamic coefficients; wave excitation – summary of wave theory, dispersion relation, wave

pressure, velocity, acceleration; encounter frequency; motion damping effects, magnification

and tuning factors. Ship responses in regular waves.

Marine environment – Irregular seaway representations, wave spectra; Ship in seaway and

dynamic effects – Linear superposition, response amplitudes operator, motions in irregular

waves, local and relative motions, green water effects, slamming, broaching, added resistance,

powering in waves; motion sickness.

Ship and floating system motion control – Control of roll – bilge keel, free surface tanks, U-tanks,

moving weight;, fin stabilisers, gyro, active-tank;, rudder stabilization; Control of pitch.

Sea-keeping performance and design aspects; factors affecting different modes of motion;

guidelines for design; Limiting motion criteria;

Ship controllability fundamentals – the control loop, motion stability, linear equations of motion,

stability indices; Stability and control in the horizontal and vertical planes; definitive manoeuvres

– turning tests, overshoot and zigzag tests, spiral and pullout tests, accelerating, stopping and

backing tests.

Control surface hydrodynamics – rudder geometry, aspect ratio, influence of fixed structures;

Control surface design – specification of requirements and constraints on rudder design, number

of rudders, type of rudder, rudder geometry, rudder stock; Influence of ship features on controls

fixed stability.

Experimental determination of hydrodynamic derivatives – straight line test, rotating arm

technique, planar motion mechanism; Numerical methods used in ship manoeuvring problems,

ship manoeuvring simulators; IMO Rules and Recommendations. Ship manoeuvring sea trials.

Se

Practicals :

  1. Calculation of free stream characteristics of rudder.
  2. Rudder design – dimensions, form, structure and system
  3. Estimation of hydrodynamic coefficients and RAOs using strip theory

Experiments:

  1. Straight line test in towing tank
  2. PMM tests in the towing tank
  3. Free running models tests in the basin
  4. Roll and heave damping coefficient estimation using free oscillation tests
  5. Ship and floating body motion response in regular waves

Text Books:

  1. Lewis,E.U, Principles of Naval Architecture, SNAME, New Jersey, U.S.A, 2010.
  2. Fossen, T.I, Guidance and Control of Marine Vehicles, John Wiley & Sons, 1999
  3. Molland,A.F and Turnock, S.R., Marine Rudders and Control Surfaces, Elsevier, 2007
  4. Lewandowski, E.M. The Dynamics of Marine Crafts – Seakeeping & Maneuvering, World

Scientific, 2004

Reference Books :

  1. Abkowitz,M.A.; Lectures on Ship Hydrodynamics – Steering and Manoeuverability, Danish

Technical Press, Copenhagen, Denmark, 1964

  1. Khac Duc Do and Jie Pan, Control of Ships and Underwater Vehicles , Springer, 2009
  2. Faltinsen, M.O. Hydrodynamics of High Speed Marine Vehicles, Cambridge Uty Press, 2005
  3. Newman J.N; ‘Marine Hydrodynamics’, MIT Press, USA, 1977
  1. Newman J.N; ‘Theory of Ship Motions’, Advances in Applied Mechanics, Vol., 1980.
Vibration of Marine Structures & Acoustics

Objectives

To enable the students to get basic knowledge of structure dynamics of single degree of freedom,

Multi-degree of freedom, continuous system, and acoustics.

Syllabus

Analysis of single degree of freedom systems – Time & Frequency domain methods continuous

system – Modes of vibration – Natural and forced vibration – vibration of beams – Sources of

vibration – propeller excited, wave-induced and machinery – Random vibrations – Calculation

procedure for torsional vibration of propulsion systems – empirical methods.

Hull girder vibration.

Vibration and sound instrumentation – sound transmission and absorption – Acoustic materials –

Origin and nature of machinery noise and their control – Effect of noise on human behavior – Noise

limits and legislations.

Text Books:

  1. Anil Chopra, “Dynamics of Structure” Prentice Hall, New Jersey, 2006.
  2. R W Clough and J Penzien, “Dynamics of Structure” McGraw-Hill International Publication,

Singapore,1993.

  1. D E Newland, “Random Vibrations, Spectral and Wavelet analysis”, John Wiley & Sons, 1993

Reference Books:

  1. L D Lutes and S Sarkani, “Random Vibrations”, Elsevier Butterworth, Burlington, USA, 2004.
  1. J L Humar, “Dynamics of structure”, CRC Press, London, 2012.
Course No. Course Title L T ExT Lab Home Cr Cat
OE3036 Maneuvering & control of Marine Vehicles 3 1 0 0 6 10 P
OE3046 Ship Structural Design 3 1 0 0 6 10 P
Free Elective - II 3 0 0 0 6 9 P
Free Elective - III 3 0 0 0 6 9 F
Free Elective - IV 3 0 0 0 6 9 F
Free Elective - V 3 0 0 0 6 9 F
OExxxx Honours Elective - I 3 0 0 0 6 9 HE
Total 15+3 2 0 0 36 56+9
Ship Design

Objectives

To enable the students to get knowledge in ship design categorization, ship design methods,

different stages of ship design, hull form design methods, ship main and auxiliary systems selection and

layout, safety considerations in ships, statutory rules and regulations applicable in ship design etc. and ship

design softwares.

Syllabus

Marine transportation and trade routes, ship categorization – dead-weight carrier, capacity

carrier, linear dimension ship; Service ships and offshore support vessels; Advanced marine

vehicles; Ship design requirements.

Ship design methods – design using basic type ships, design using coefficients, design using

iteration methods; design spiral; Ship parameters – displacement, displacement coefficient,

displacement equation, volume equation, solution of the cubic equation; Ship dimensions, hull

form, form coefficients; Mass estimation – lightship mass – steel mass, outfit mass, engine plant

mass; dead weight.

Design of hull form – conventional method of lines, distortion of existing forms; stem and stern

contours, bulbous bow.; General arrangement – Subdivision of the ship’s hull and erections,

arrangement of spaces, arrangement of tanks, superstructure and deckhouses, arrangement of

engine plants, cargo handling capacity, hold capacity and stowage factor.

Effect of form on Ship’s performance: Freeboard and load line regulation; Stability – stability

booklet, IMO Regulations, Checks on stability, trim; Watertight integrity; damage stability,

Behaviour of ships in sea, resistance, powering, propulsion

Cargo handling equipments, cargo hatches; Anchoring and mooring systems; Accommodation

requirements, layout and design. Access equipments –hatches, manholes, doors, other closing

& opening devices, load line rules, gang ways and ladders; LSA and FFA; Steering gear

systems, navigational systems.

Tender specification; Economic considerations in ship design and building; Operational

economics; Introduction to ship design softwares.

Practicals:

  1. Computer-Aided ship design – owner’s requirement of ship (given), design of main

dimensions, design of form, weight estimation, hydrostatics, checks on stability, trim,

capacity, general arrangement, etc.

  1. Practicals on softwares dealing with basic ship calculations and ship design.

Text books:

  1. D.G.M.Watson, “Practical Ship Design”, Elsevier (2002)
  2. Thomas Lamb, “Ship Design and Construction”, SNAME (2003)
  3. Apostolos Papanikolaou, Ship Design: Methodologies of preliminary design, , SNAME, 2014.

Reference books:

  1. Schneekluth, H; Ship Design for Efficiency and Economy, Butterworths, 1987
  2. Taggart; Ship Design and Construction, SNAME, 1980.
  3. Indra Nath Bose, Energy Efficiency and Ships, SNAME, 2012.
  4. Antony F Molland, A Guide to ship design, construction and operation, SNAME, 2008.
Course No. Course Title L T ExT Lab Home Cr Cat
OE3026 Shipyard Training (Summer) 0 0 0 0 6 6 P
Ship Design

Objectives

To enable the students to get exposed to actual ship building activities and learn all the industry practice in designing and fabrication of a ship

Syllabus

As per industry requirements in concurrence with one faculty advisor

Course No. Course Title L T ExT Lab Home Cr Cat
OExxxx Professional Elective - I 3 0 0 0 6 9 P
OE5320 Non Linear Problems in Ocean engg 3 0 0 0 6 9 P
OE6200 Design of Offshore Structures 3 0 0 0 6 9 P
Free Elective-VI 3 0 0 0 6 9 F
Free Elective-VII 3 0 0 0 6 9 F
Honours Elective - II 3 0 0 0 6 9
Total 15 1 0 0 30 45+9
Professional Ethics 2 0 0 0 0 0
Design of Offshore Structures

Syllabus

Loads on offshore structures

Wind Loads; Wave and Current Loads; Calculation based on Maximum base Shear and Overturning Moments; Design Wave heights and Spectral Definition; Hydrodynamic Coefficients and Marine Growth; Fatigue Load Definition and Joint Probability distribution; Seismic Loads;

Steel Tubular Member Design

Principles of WSD and LRFD; Allowable stresses and Partial Safety Factors; Tubular Members, Slenderness effects; Column Buckling, Design for combined axial and bending stresses (API RP 2A guidelines);

Tubular Joint Design for Static and Cyclic Loads

Simple tubular joints; stress concentration factors; S-N curves and fatigue damage calculations.

Jackup Rigs

Configuration and operation of jackups; Simplified analysis; Spudcan penetration and extraction; Spudcan – pile interaction; Design of jackup legs;

Design against Accidental Loads (Fire, Blast and Collision)

Behaviour of steel at elevated temperature; Fire Rating for Hydrocarbon fire; Design of structures for high temperature; Blast Mitigation-Blast walls; Collision of Boats and energy absorption; Platform survival capacity and Plastic design methods

Example tutorial problems on design of tubular members, Stress concentration factors, fatigue estimation, wave load on structures

Course No. Course Title L T ExT Lab Home Cr Cat
HSxxxx Humanities Elective - III 3 0 0 0 6 9 H
OE5230 Foundation of Offshore Structures 3 0 0 0 6 9 P
OE5500 FEM Applied to Ocean Engineering 3 0 0 0 6 9 P
Professional Elective - IV 3 0 0 0 6 9 P
Free Elective - VIII 3 0 0 0 6 9 F
Honours Elective - III 3 0 0 0 6 9 HE
Total 12 0 0 0 24 45+9
Foundation of Offshore Structures

Syllabus

Basic Soil Mechanics: Basic soil properties, correlation between engineering parameters, geotechnical investigation, bore log.

Pile foundation: Jacket main piles, skirt piles, driven piles, drilled and grouted piles, steel and concrete piles, axial capacity, point bearing and skin friction, factor of safety, lateral load on piles, p-y, t-z and q-z curves, pile group effect, scour around piles, seabed subsidence and design of piles against seabed movement, negative skin friction, cyclic degradation, main pile to jacket connections, skirt pile to jacket connections, API RP 2A provisions.

Pile Installation: Minimum pile wall thickness, pile handling stresses, static and dynamic stresses, pile stickup, stresses during stick up, wave and current loads, hammer selection, pile driving stresses, wave equation analysis, pile driving fatigue, API RP 2A guidelines.

Pile Testing: Working load test, ultimate load test, pile monitoring during driving, pile integrity testing, high strain dynamic testing, rebound method.

Special foundations: Mud-mats: bearing capacity, sliding stability, over-turning stability, short term and long term settlements, factor of safety; Bucket foundation; Suction anchors; Gravity foundation.

Example problem and tutorial on axial capacity of piles, lateral capacity and load deflection of laterally load piles; Mudmat bearing capacity; group effect;

FEM Applied to Ocean Engineering

Syllabus

Introduction – Different approaches to finite element formulation – Different types of elements and interpolation functions, Language & Hermite Polynomials, natural co-ordinates – Derivation of element property matrices – Assembly – solution of finite element equations – Structural and geotechnical problems – Nonlinear analysis.

Application to fluid mechanics problems, Fluid – structure interaction – Diffraction of waves, 2D formulation using mild – slope equation – use of infinite elements – Added mass and damping matrices for floating bodies, 2D formulation – Harbour resonance, Liquid sloshing – Vibrations of underwater structures – Introduction to Boundary Element Techniques.

Course No. Course Title L T ExT Lab Home Cr Cat
OE5370* DD Project – Phase1 0 0 0 15 10 25 P
DD Project - Phase1

Objectives

Prepare the student to carry out independent tasks

Syllabus

Based on Literature review the student choses the topic of the Project in concurrence with the faculty supervisor.

Course No. Course Title L T ExT Lab Home Cr Cat
OE5370* DD Project - Phase 2 0 0 0 10 10 20 P
Provisional Elective - V 3 0 0 0 6 9 P
Professional Elective - VI 3 0 0 0 6 9 P
Total 9 0 0 10 28 47
Non-Linear Problems in Ocean Engg

Syllabus

Conservative and nonconservative systems, Quadratic and cubic nonlinearities, Nonlinear damping, Forced oscillations, Sub and Superharmonic responses, Parametrically excited systems, Chaotic motion, System identification.

Nonlinear wave theories and wave loading, Nonlinear models of compliant platforms and soil-structure interaction, Risers and moorings, Nonlinear wave loading on large floating systems, Slow drift oscillation, Random response and statistical analysis.

DD Project - Phase2

Objectives

Prepare the student to carry out independent tasks

Syllabus

Based on Literature review the student choses the topic of the Project in concurrence with the faculty supervisor.

Course No. Course Title L T ExT Lab Home Cr Cat
OE5370* DD Project – Phase 3 0 0 0 25 15 40 P
Total 0 0 0 25 15 40
DD Project - Phase3

Objectives

Prepare the student to carry out independent tasks

Syllabus

Based on Literature review the student choses the topic of the Project in concurrence with the faculty supervisor.

No Title L T Ext Lab Home Cr
ELECTIVE (A) - Mathematics
MA2010 Complex Variables 3 0 0 0 6 9
MA2030 Differential Equations 3 0 0 0 6 9
MA2040 Probability, Stochastic Process &Statisics 3 0 0 0 6 9
MA2060 Discrete Mathematics 3 0 0 0 6 9
MA2130 Basic Graph Theory 3 0 0 0 6 9
ELECTIVE (E) – Professional / Free for NA&OE (BTech&DD)
ME3350 Design of Machine Elements 3 0 0 0 6 9
MM3012 Joining and NDT Lab 3 0 0 0 6 9
MM3060 Metal Joining Technology 3 0 0 0 6 9
MM5320 Corrosion Engineering 3 0 0 0 6 9
MM5750 Welding Application Technology 3 0 0 0 6 9
OE4300 Ocean Energy 3 0 0 0 6 9
OE4400 Drilling vessels and Support Crafts 3 0 0 0 6 9
OE4600 Advance ship Hydrodynamics 3 0 0 0 6 9
OE4xxx Shipbuilding Material & Production Processes 3 0 0 0 6 9
OE5011 Marine Robotics 3 0 0 0 6 9
OE5080 Marine Instrumentation 3 0 0 0 6 9
OE5170 Ocean Acoustics 3 0 0 0 6 9
OE5230 Foundation of Offshore Structures 3 0 0 0 6 9
OE5310 Guidance and control of Marine Vehicles 3 0 0 0 6 9
OE5320 Nonlinear Problems in Ocean Engineering 3 0 0 0 6 9
OE5330 Advanced Marine Structures 3 0 0 0 6 9
OE5xxx Advanced Structural Analysis Of Marine Vehicles 3 0 0 0 6 9
OE5xxx Design Of Fishing Vessels 3 0 0 0 6 9
OE5xxx Design Of Ship Outfit Systems 3 0 0 0 6 9
OE5xxx Design Of Submarine And Submersible 3 0 0 0 6 9
OE5xxx Marine Corrosion, Prevention And Control 3 0 0 0 6 9
OE4xxx Ship Electrical And Electronic Systems 3 0 0 0 6 9
OE4xxx Ship Positioning Systems 3 0 0 0 6 9
OE5xxx Design Of High Speed Vessels 3 0 0 0 6 9
OE5xxx Warship Design 3 0 0 0 6 9
OE4xxx Analysis And Design Tools In Marine Hydrodynamics 3 0 0 0 6 9
OE4xxx Laboratory Modelling In Marine Hydrodynamics 3 0 0 0 6 9
OE5xxx Design, Construction and Operation of LNG Carriers and Terminals 3 0 0 0 6 9
OE5450 Numerical Techniques in Ocean Hydrodynamics 3 0 0 0 6 9
OE5500 FEM Applied to Ocean Engineering 3 0 0 0 6 9
OE5600 Advanced Wave Dynamics 3 0 0 0 6 9
OE5800 Coastal Engineering 3 0 0 0 6 9
OE6005 Reliability of Offshore Structures 3 0 0 0 6 9
OE6020 Mesh-free Methods Applied to Hydrodynamics 3 0 0 0 6 9
OE6200 Design of Offshore Structures 3 0 0 0 6 9
OE6300 Plated Structures and Shells 3 0 0 0 6 9
OE6930 Modeling of Offshore and Coastal Processes 3 0 0 0 6 9
OE6980 Computer Aided Surface Development of Marine 3 0 0 0 6 9
OE6990 Advanced Marine Vehicles 3 0 0 0 6 9
PE6060 HSE Management in Petroleum and Offshore Engineering 3 0 0 0 6 9
Design of Ocean Structures

Objectives

To make the students understand the basic principles of design of ocean structures. The course will cover the wide areas such as coastal structures (breakwaters, jetties, ports and harbours) and offshore structures (fixed platforms, floating structures) and the wave-structure interaction.

Syllabus

Coastal Structures:

Design principles of breakwater, seawall, groynes, berthing structures, quaywalls and open sea jetty, breasting and mooring dolphins; Dry Docks, Slipways; Code Provisions : IS 4651, IS 2911 and BS 6349

Offshore Structures:

Concepts and design principles of jacket and topside structures, Tension Leg Platforms, Spar Structures, Jackups and FPSO’s; Concepts and design of foundation for offshore structures; Code Provisions : API RP 2A and API RP 2T

Text Books:

1.Coastal Hydrualics by A.M.M. Wood and C.A. Fleming, Macmillan Press Limited, 1981.

2.Coastal Engineering by K. Horikawa, University of Tokyo Press, 1978

3.Design and Construction of Port and Marine Structures by A. D. Quinn, McGraw-Hill Book Company

4.Port Design – Guidelines and recommendations by C. A. Thoresen, Tapir Publications

5.Design of Marine Facilities for the Berthing, Mooring and Repair of Vessels by J. W. Gaythwaite, Van Nostrand;

Reference Books:

Handbook of Offshore Engineering by S.K. Chakrabarti, Elseviers, 2005.

Ocean Energy

Objectives

In the world’s present scenario, there is a need for exploring alternative energy sources especially renewable sources like ocean energy. This course will throw light into ocean energy and extraction principles and, create an interest to contribute for the successful extraction of energy from the Ocean in the future.

Syllabus

Generation of waves – Wave theories – Tidal waves – Energy from oceans – Tides, Waves, Currents, Salinity and thermal gradients with special reference to Indian coast – Energy converters for extraction of ocean energy – Design principles of wave power, tidal power and OTEC systems –Cost–benefit analysis.

Advance ship Hydrodynamics

Objectives

The objective of the course is to introduce advanced theoretical and numerical methods of hydrodynamics needed to determine the resistance and motion characteristics of marine vehicles.

Syllabus

  1. Introduction. Review of basic hydrodynamics, wave mechanics and complexities of practical Ship Hydrodynamics problems.
  2. Navier-Stokes Equation: Formulation and derivation of ship hydrodynamics in real fluids. Some exact solutions including of impulsively started plate. Boundary-Layer theory. Blasius solution. Friction lines of ships.
  3. Computational Fluid Dynamics: Introduction to boundary-integral and finite-difference methods applied for ship hydrodynamics problems. Application of vortex-lattice and panel methods for lifting surface hydrodynamics.
  4. Approximate Methods: Slender body theory; Strip theory for determining ship motion in waves. Michell’s thin ship theory to determine wave resistance.
  5. Recent Advances: Discussion of recent developments and frontier problems in Ship Hydrodynamic

Reference Books and Notes:

  1. Class and lecture notes
  1. N. Newman, “Marine Hydrodynamics,” MIT Press.
  1. M. Faltinsen, Hydrodynamics of High-Speed Marine Vehicles, Cambridge University Press
  1. Select journal articles in ship hydrodynamics.
Shipbuilding Material & Production Processes

Objectives

To introduce B.Tech/ M.Tech (Dual Degree) students to the building blocks and principles in the area of ship production and to seed the plants of research and design in their minds. The proposed topics have been arranged with help of experts from shipyard and well known academicians.

Syllabus

Materials (Steel, Aluminum and Composites), Introduction to Marine Corrosion and Control; Painting schemes.

Shipyard layout; Steel stockyard and material; Material preparation – straightening of plates and rolled sections, shot/sand blasting, priming; Fabrication of component parts.

Block assembly processes, Metal cutting processes, Bending of rolled and built up sections; Plate bending. Line heating. Line heating and welding methods, standards, symbols. Sub-assemblies: web frames, machine foundations etc.;

Product standardization and work simplification; Piping, framing, cabling, ventilation, foundation, and accommodation; Painting; Insulation; Product work breakdown and integrated zone engineering;

Prefabrication of panels, panel production line, Assembly of flat and corrugated sections, flat sections with curvature – assembly jigs; Pre-assembly of volume units – double bottom sections–side tank units–structural arrangement; Preassembly of the fore and aft end structure; superstructures.

Erection of ship hull, Auxiliary devices; Deformation of the ship’s hull; Quality control (X-ray tests etc); Scaffolding, Manufacturing Shop floor planning, Activities in shipyard pipe, machine and shipwrights shops. Launching – General methods, Launching by floating off, slipway launching – stern launching, side launching;

Linear programming concepts; Network analysis; Scheduling and resource allocation; Relational Database Management System (RDBMS) in production planning and control; Operations management principles and methods, Applications to the production of complex marine systems such as ships, offshore structures, and yachts.

Tutorials: Planning and scheduling in Matlab, RDBMS in MS-Access; computations in Ms-Excel, Shell expansion drawing, plate nesting, docking plan, launching calculations.

Text books:

[1] George J. Bruce, David J. Eyres (2012), “Ship Construction”, Butterworth-Heinemann, 7th edition.

[2] Ben C. Gerwick Jr. (2007), “Construction of Marine and Offshore Structures”, CRC Press, 3rd edition.

[3] Robert Taggart (1980), “Ship Design and Construction”, SNAME, USA.

[4] L. N. Aggarwal, K. C. Jain (2014), “Production Planning Control & Industrial Management”, Khanna Publishers, India.

Reference books

[1] Richard L. Storch, Colin P. Hammon, Howard M. Bunch (1988), “Ship Production”, Cornell Maritime Pr/Tidewater Publication, 1st edition.

[2] John Letcher, J. Randolph Paulling (2010), “The Principles of Naval Architecture Series: The Geometry of Ships”, SNAME, USA.

Marine Instrumentation

Objectives

This course focuses on the principles of ocean instrumentation. All instruments consist of the following stages: transduction, signal conditioning, and data observation/analysis. This course describes these principles by using specific instruments such as SONAR, Conductivity Temperature Depth (CTD) profilers, current measurements, Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers (ADCP). In addition to this the course also discusses data analysis for the different measurements recorded by the instruments.

Syllabus

Dynamic response of measuring instruments (with examples), Acoustic instruments and transducers, CTD construction and operation, Expendable ocean instruments, current profilers, and strain gauges, Acoustic positioning systems. Sampling, Spectral Analysis, Basic Filtering, Measuring system response using spectral analysis (magnitude and phase response).

Textbook and Reference Materials

  1. “Mechanical Measurements,” by Thomas G. Beckwith, Roy D. Marangoni, and John H. Lienhard V, 6th Edition, 2009 ISBN 9780122274305 published by Prentice Hall
  2. James Irish, and Albert Williams III. 2.693 “Principles of Oceanographic Instrument Systems – Sensors and Measurements (13.998)”, Spring 2004. (Massachusetts Institute of Technology: MIT OpenCourseWare), http://ocw.mit.edu (Accessed 30 Jan, 2015). License: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA
  3. “Encyclopedia of OceanSciences” 2nd Edition Six Volumes set, 2009ISBN9780122274305 published by Academic Press
Ocean Acoustics

Objectives

The objective of the course is to introduce principles and properties of underwater acoustics through formulation and analysis of transmission, reflection, absorption, attenuation of sound waves in the ocean including boundary and stratification effects.

Syllabus

  1. Introduction. Physical properties of sea water. Effects of density, salinity and temperature on sound speed. Underwater sound channels (USC). Surface and bottom effects. Ambient noise.
  2. Sound Propagation: Wave equation;Helmholtz equation; Lighthill’s acoustic analogy; Point source and plane wave solutions; Refraction of sound waves; Snell’s Law; Caustics and shadow zones; Ray theory.
  • Reflection and Transmission: Changes at an interface between to immiscible liquids. Transmission of sound from air to water and vice versa; Reflection from ocean bottom; Propagation of sound in shallow water.
  1. Sound propagation in Underwater Sound Channel (USC): Ray theory for USC; Munk’s model; Acoustic field as sum of normal modes; Analysis based on a parabolic equation,
  2. Scattering of Sound: Scattering at rough boundary surfaces; Method of small perturbation (MSP); Scattering of sound by surface waves and internal waves.
  3. Sound Radiation: Generation of sound by marine vehicles and offshore platforms.

Acoustics Applications: Remote sensing; Underwater communication; Sonar principle and use; Acoustic tomography; Geophysical seismic exploration.

Reference Books and Notes:

  1. M. Brekhovskikh and Yu. P. Lysanov, “Fundamentals of Ocean Acoustics,” Springer Series on Wave Phenomena (Edited by L.B. Felsen), Springer-Verlag, 1982.
  2. Kinsler, Frey, Coppens and Sanders, “Fundamentals of Acoustics”, 4th edition, 1999.
  3. Class and lecture notes
Advanced Marine Structures

Objectives

The course will give a brief overview of Ultimate load design principles and plastic capacity of sections Capacity estimate of tubular joints under axial, flexural and torsional buckling will be discussed. Fundamentals of impact analysis and its application to collision problems on marine structures will be also highlighted. A brief section on fluid-structure interaction highlighting flow induced vibration will be presented. Introductory topics on reliability of marine structures including FOSM and AFSOM methods will be also discussed. Concepts of fatigue analysis and design of marine structures will be presented. The focus is on detailed explanation of topics through numerical examples.

Syllabus

Module 1: Ultimate load design: Principles and factors affecting the strength. Fundamentals of plastic analysis of sections- estimate of plastic capacity of beams and frames- application to marine structures. Theories of failure- Capacity estimate of tubular joints under axial, flexural and torsional buckling-design examples. Fundamentals of impact analysis

Module 2: Fluid-structure interaction- elements of flow-induced vibration- Flow through perforated members

Module 3: Introduction to reliability of marine structures- Reliability concepts and methods- FOSM and AFSOM methods

Module 4: Fatigue and fracture- fatigue failure- cumulative fatigue damage models- fatigue analysis and design of marine structures-spectral fatigue damage

Text Books

  1. Arvid Naess and Torgeir Moan. 2013. Stochastic dynamics of marine structures, Cambridge University Press, New York, USA.
  2. Chaudhary, G.K and Dover, W.D. 1985. Fatigue analysis of offshore platforms subjected to sea wave loading, Int. J. Fatigue, 7.
  3. Gerwick, B.C.Jr. 1986. Construction of Offshore Structures: John Wiley, New York.
  4. Haldar, A., and Mahadevan, S. 2000. Probability, reliability and statistical methods in engineering design. John Wiley and Sons, New York.
  5. Hsu, H.T. 1981. Applied Offshore Structural Engineering: Gulf Publishing Co., Houston.
  6. Melchers RE. (1999). Structural reliability: analysis and prediction, 2nd Edition, John Wiley.
  7. Papoulis, A. and Pillai, SU (1991). Probability, random variables and stochastic processes, 3rd Edition, McGraw-Hill, New York.
  8. Srinivasan Chandrasekaran. 2015a. Dynamic analysis and design of ocean structures. Springer, INDIA, ISBN: 978-81-322-2276-7.
  9. Srinivasan Chandrasekaran. 2015b. Advanced Marine structures, CRC Press, Florida (USA), ISBN 9781498739689.
  10. Srinivasan Chandrasekaran. 2016. Offshore structural engineering: Reliability and Risk Assessment. CRC Press, Florida, ISBN:978-14-987-6519-0.
  11. Srinivasan Chandrasekaran and A.K.Jain. 2016. Ocean structures: Construction, Materials and Operations, CRC Press, Florida, ISBN: 978-14-987-9742-9.
  12. Throft-Christensen, P. and Baker,M. (1982). Structural reliability theory and applications, Springer Verlag, Berlin.
  13. Wirsching, P., Palz K. Ortiz. 2006. Random vibration: Theory and Practice, Dover, NY.

Reference Books:

  1. Ang, AHS and Tang, WH. 1975. Probability concepts in engineering and design, Volume 1 – Basic concepts, John Wiley, NY
  2. Ang, AHS and Tang, WH. 1975. Probability concepts in engineering and design, Volume 2 – Basic concepts, John Wiley, NY
  3. ASTM E 1049-85. 2005. Rain flow counting method, 1987.
  4. Benjamin, JR and Cornell, CA. 1970. Probability, statistics and decisions for civil engineers, John Wiley, New York.
  5. Chakrabarti, S. K. 1987. Hydrodynamics of Offshore Structures: Computational Mechanics.
  6. Chakrabarti, S. K. 1990. Non-linear method in offshore engineering, Elsevier Science Publisher, The Netherlands.
  7. Chakrabarti, S. K. 1994.Offshore Structure Modeling: World Scientific.
  8. Clauss, G. T. et al. 1992. Offshore Structures, Vol 1 – Conceptual Design and Hydromechanics: Springer, London.
  9. Dawson, T. H., 1983. Offshore Structural Engineering: Prentice-Hall Inc.
  10. Graff, W.J. 1981. Introduction to offshore structures: Design, fabrication and installation: Gulf Publishing Co, Tokyo.
  11. Graff, W.J. 1981. Introduction to Offshore Structures: Gulf Publishing Co., Houston.
  12. John S. Popovics, Jerzy Zemajtis and Iosif Shkolnik. 2008. Studies on static and dynamic modulus of elasticity, ACI-CRC report.
  13. Kam, J.C.P and Dover, W.D. 1989. Advanced tool for fast assessment of fatigue under offshore random wave stress hostory, INtn of Engrs, Part. 2, 87:539-556.
  14. Kam, J.C.P. and Dover, W.D. 1988. Fast fatigue assessment procedure for offshore structure under random time history, Proc. Institution of Civil Engineers, Part 2, 85:689-700.
  15. Love A.E.H. 1994. Mathematical theory of elasticity,, Dover publications Inc, NY.
  16. Madsen, HO, Krenk, S. and NC Lind, NC. (2006). Methods of structural safety, Dover.
  17. Mather, A. 2000. Offshore Engineering: an Introduction, 2nd edn: Witherby
  18. Matsuishi, M. and T. Endo. 1968. Fatigue of metals subjected to varying stresses, Japan Soc. of Mech. Engrs, Fukuoka, Japan, 3:37-40.
  19. Neviele, A. M. 1997. Properties of concrete, 4th Ed, JOhn Wiley & Sons, NY.
  20. Sadehi, K. 1989. Design and analysis of Marine structures: Khajeh Nasirroddin Tsi University of Technology, Tehran, Iran.
  21. Sarpkaya, T. and Isaacson, M. 1981. Mechanics of Wave Forces on Offshore Structures: Van Nostrand Reinhold.
  22. Srinivasan Chandrasekaran and Subrata Kumar Bhattacharyya. 2012. Analysis and Design of Offshore Structures with illustrated examples. Human Resource Development Center for Offshore and Plant Engineering (HOPE Center), Changwon National University Press, Republic of Korea ISBN: 978-89-963915-5-5.

Srinivasan Chandrasekaran. 2014. Advanced Theory on Offshore Plant FEED Engineering, Changwon National University, Republic of South Korea, pp. 237. ISBN:978-89-969792-8-9

Numerical Techniques in Ocean Hydrodynamics

Objectives

This course is aimed at capability building in students in hydrodyamic computation and code development using traditional and contemporary models. Students are required to carry out a number of basic numerical and advanced hydrodynamic formulations and code development

Syllabus

Revisit Fluid Dynamics fundamentals. Numerical solution of Diffusion, Advection and Burgers’ equations . Requirements of numerical solutions – Lax theorem; linear stability analysis. Introduction to CFD concepts: Pressure elimination, Pressure correction and Split algorithms; modeling of turbulence; introduction to LES, DES and DNS. Computations in solution of PDEs, Pressure elimination and Pressure correction. Introduction to computations using unstructured meshes.
Introduction to Numerical Marine Hydrodynamics: Partial differential equations of inviscid hydrodynamics; Code development and computations of hydrodynamics of wave-structure interaction for fixed and floating bodies using BIEM, BEM and FEM techniques; Application of Fast methods; Time domain computation – non-linear velocity potential and acceleration potential approaches. Free surface computation in viscous models – VOF and Levelset. Computation of the motions of ships in waves. Forward speed problem and computation. Integral boundary layer equations and numerical solutions.
Introduction to Parallel Machines and High Performance Computing.
Text Books: NIL
Reference Books: Anderson, D. Computational Fluid Dynamics, McGraw Hill International Editions, 1995. Tannehill, C., Anderson, D and Pletcher, R. Computational Fluid Mechanics and Heat Transfer, 1997. Newman, JN. Marine Hydrodynamics, MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, 1977. Journal and thesis publications and prescribed by teacher.

FEM Applied to Ocean Engineering

Objectives

To familiarize the application of FE techniques in the field of Ocean Hydrodynamics with emphasis on all key elements of the method.

Syllabus

Introduction – Different approaches to finite element formulation – Different types of element and interpolation functions, Lagrange & Hermite Polynomials, natural co-ordinates – Derivation of element property matrices – Assembly – solution of finite element equations – Structural and geotechnical problems – Nonlinear analysis.

Application to fluid mechanics problems, Fluid-structure interaction – Diffraction of waves, 2D formulation using mild – slope equation – use of infinite elements – Added mass and damping matrices for floating bodies, 2D formulation – Harbour resonance, Liquid sloshing – Vibrations of underwater structures

Introduction to Particle based methods/ Lattice Boltzmann Method.

Text Books:

  • N. Reddy. 1984. An Introduction to the finite element method. McGraw Hill. (third edition, 2005)
  • C. Zienkiewicz, R.W. Lewis and K.G. Stagg (eds.) 1978. Numerical methods in Offshore Engineering. Wiley.

Reference Books:

  • D. Cook. 1981. Concepts and applications of finite element analysis. Wiley.
  • C. Zienkiewicz. 1977. The Finite Element Method. McGraw Hill. (vol.I, II, III)
  • J. Bathe. 1981. FE procedures in Engineering Analysis.
Advanced Wave Dynamics

Objectives

Syllabus

Coastal Engineering

Objectives

To cover the behavior of waves and sediments in the near shore region and their application to coastal Engineering practice with a few case studies.

Syllabus

Waves in shallow waters – Shoaling, refraction, diffraction and breaking– Interaction currents and waves- near shore currents-wave run-up and overtopping- coastal sediment characteristics- Initiation of sediment motion under waves- Radiation stress-wave set-up and wave set- down- mechanics of coastal sediment transport – Limits for littoral drift – Suspended and Bed Load – alongshore sediment transport rate – Distribution of alongshore currents and Sediment transport rates in Surf zone. Physical modeling in Coastal Engineering. Onshore offshore sediment transport – Stability of tidal inlets- Coastal features – Beach Features – Beach cycles – Beach Stability – Beach profiles -Coastal erosion, Planning and methods of coast protection works – Design of shore defense structures – Non-breaking and breaking wave forces on coastal structures -Breakwaters- Classification, Design and application in coastal protection and harbor planning- Case studies on coastal erosion and protection-Generation, propagation and effect of tsunami.

Text Books:

Horikawa,K., Coastal Engineering, University of Tokyo press, 1978

Sorenson, R.M., Basic Coastal Engineering, A Wiley-Interscience Publication, New York, 1978

Kamphius,J.W. Introduction to coastal Engineering and Management, Advances on Ocean Engineering-Volume 16, World Scientific,2002.

References:

Reeve,D., Chadwick, A. and Fleming, C. Coastal Engineering-Processes, theory and design practice, Spon Press, Taylor & Francis Group, London & Paris,2004

Silvester,R. and Hsu,J.R.C. Coastal Stabilisation, Advances on Ocean Engineering-Volume 14, World Scientific, 1997.

Coastal Engineering Manual, U.S.Army Corps of Engineers, Washington, DC 20314-1000,, Vol. 1 to 3, July 2003.

Wood,M., Coastal Hydraulics: Mcmillan, Civil Engineering Hydraulics, London, 1969

Decisions.” CIFE Technical Report (177), Stanford University, Stanford.

Reliability of Offshore Structures

Objectives

Syllabus

Mesh-free Methods Applied to Hydrodynamics

Objectives

To introduce the students to Meshfree or particle Methods and to show them that there are alternatives to the Mesh based Methods, which are currently being used by the numerical modeling group worldwide.

Syllabus

Numerical modelling; Basics of fluid mechanics; NS – Eulerian and Lagrangian Formulations; Free surface and Body boundary conditions; Time split algorithms; Strong and Weak forms; Weighted Residual methods.

Overview of mesh based methods and meshfree methods; Basic techniques; Categories of meshfree methods; shape function constructions – Issues; SPH; Point Interpolations; Moving least square method; Shepard Functions; Error estimations; Support domain and Influence domain; Weight functions; Meshfree Integrations; Computational Cost; Conservation and Convergence.

Meshfree methods based on Global weak form – EFG; Meshfree methods based on Local weak form – MLPG; Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics; Moving Particle Semi-Implicit method; Essential Boundary conditions – Issues; Turbulence – Sub-particle scale; Meshfree methods applied to fluid dynamics problem; Matrix formulations and solution methods in meshfree methods; application to floating bodies, coastal engineering.

Text Books:

[1] G.R. Liu (2006), “Mesh free methods: Moving beyond the finite element method”, CRC Press, Taylor and Francis, US.

Reference Books:

[1] J. Anderson (1995), “Computational Fluid Dynamics: The basics with applications”, McGraw-Hill, USA.

[2] Li H and Mulay SS (2013), “Meshless methods and their numerical properties”, CRC Press, Taylor and Francis, US.

[3] S.N. Atluri (2004), “The Meshless method (MLPG) for domain and BIE discretizations”, Tech Science Press.

[4] G.R. Liu and M.B. Liu (2003), “Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics”, World Scientific, Singapore. (also available as E-book)

Design of Offshore Structures

Syllabus

Loads on offshore structures

Wind Loads; Wave and Current Loads; Calculation based on Maximum base Shear and Overturning Moments; Design Wave heights and Spectral Definition; Hydrodynamic Coefficients and Marine Growth; Fatigue Load Definition and Joint Probability distribution; Seismic Loads;

Steel Tubular Member Design

Principles of WSD and LRFD; Allowable stresses and Partial Safety Factors; Tubular Members, Slenderness effects; Column Buckling, Design for combined axial and bending stresses (API RP 2A guidelines);

Tubular Joint Design for Static and Cyclic Loads

Simple tubular joints; stress concentration factors; S-N curves and fatigue damage calculations.

Jackup Rigs

Configuration and operation of jackups; Simplified analysis; Spudcan penetration and extraction; Spudcan – pile interaction; Design of jackup legs;

Design against Accidental Loads (Fire, Blast and Collision)

Behaviour of steel at elevated temperature; Fire Rating for Hydrocarbon fire; Design of structures for high temperature; Blast Mitigation-Blast walls; Collision of Boats and energy absorption; Platform survival capacity and Plastic design methods

Example tutorial problems on design of tubular members, Stress concentration factors, fatigue estimation, wave load on structures

Modeling of Offshore and Coastal Processes

Objectives

This computational lab based course provides hands on training on state of the art wave propagation, circulation and morphodynamic models.

Syllabus

Theories of wind – generated ocean waves – Wind-wave Modelling: Third generation Wind – Wave modelling: WAM, SWAN & STWAVE for wave hind-casting and forecasting.

Deformation of water waves: Solution of Helmholtz and Mild slope equations; Nearshore wave propagation in phase-averaging and phase-resolving models; Boussinesq wave model; applications to large bodies and harbours – computations in 2D; introduction to public domain and industry software.

Ocean hydrodynamics: Circulation with Tide, Temperature & Salinity; Turbulence in Ocean; Shallow Water Equations and their solution; applications to Nearshore circulation; Storm surge & Tsunami. Modelling of scalar transport and morphodynamics.

Text Books:

Dyke, P. Modeling Coastal and Offshore Processes. Imperial College Press, 2007.

Komen, G.J., Cavaleri, L., Donelan, M., Hasselmann, K., Hasselmann, S., Janssen, P.A.E.M. Dynamics and modeling of ocean waves, Cambridge university press, New York, 1994.

Nielsen, P. Coastal and Estuarine Processes, World Scientific, 2009.

Reference Books:

Mellor G.L., User Guide for a three-dimensional, primitive equation, numerical ocean model, 1998.

Computer Aided Surface Development of Marine

Objectives

In a structured manner, this course introduces the mathematics and programming implementation of geometric design that is needed to design smooth and fair curves, surfaces and volumes for engineering sciences – free form shapes.

Syllabus

Module 1: Introduction and classification of geometric modeling forms for curves, surfaces and volumes; differential geometry of curves and surfaces; introduction to spline curves; Bezier splines; Uniform/non-uniform Rational B-splines; and fitting, fairing and generalized cylinders.

Module 2: Introduction to blending surfaces; intersection problems in geometric design; offsets of parametric curves, surfaces and volumes; constructive solid geometry, boundary representation; decomposition models; and advanced topics in differential geometry.

Module 3: Object matching; finite element and boundary element meshing algorithms; robustness of geometric computations; introduction to interval methods; scientific visualization; variational geometry; tolerances; inspection methods; feature representation and recognition; and shape interrogation for design, analysis, and manufacturing.

Text books

[1] G. Farin (2001), Curves and Surfaces for CAGD: A Practical Guide, The Morgan Kaufmann Series in Computer Graphics, 5th edition, Morgan Kaufmann, USA.

[2] D. F. Rogers and J. A. Adams (1989), Mathematical Elements for Computer Graphics, 2nd edition, Tata McGraw-Hill, India.

Reference books

[1] K. K. Dube (2009), Differential Geometry and Tensors, I. K. International Publishing House PL, India.

[2] Q. Khan (2012), Differential Geometry of Manifolds, Prentice Hall India Learning Private Limited, India.

[3] N. M. Patrikalakis and T. Maekawa (2010), Shape Interrogation for Computer Aided Design and Manufacturing, Springer.

[4] D. Somasundaram (2008), Differential Geometry: A First Course, Narosa Book Distributors, India.

Advanced Marine Vehicles

Objectives

Enable the student to understand, characterize, evaluate resistance, powering and basic hydrodynamic behaviour of advance marine vehicle including warship and submarine

Syllabus

  1. An introduction in advanced marine vehicle (AMV) types.
  2. The basic principles of the different types of advanced marine vehicles will be explained, supported by data of recently build vessels.
  3. Hydrodynamic aspects, the contradiction between resistance and propulsion and on the other hand ships movements will be dealt with.
  4. Design strategies in the design of advanced marine vehicles.
  5. Several types of propulsion systems such as but not limited to water jets, cavitating and non cavitating propellers.
  6. Structural Aspects of AMVs
  7. An introduction to warship and Submarines
  8. Hydrostatic and hydrodynamic aspects of warship and Submarine.

Reference Books :

1.Thomas Lamp “Ship Design and Construction” Vol1 and Vol 2 published by SNAME

2.Liang Yun ” High Performance marine vessels” Springer publication3.PJ Gates “Surface Warship-An Introduction to design principles” 1987 Brassey’s Defence Publisher

3.PJ Gates “Surface Warship-An Introduction to design principles” 1987 Brassey’s Defence Publishers.

HSE Management in Petroleum and Offshore Engineering

Objectives

  • The course aims to introduce the post-graduate students the basics of oil and gas production systems which will mainly include artificial pumping systems for petroleum production and designing of surface production operations related to storage and processing of reservoir fluids.
  • The course aims to bridge knowledge gap of the students between Drilling and Well Completions and the Petroleum Production Operations.

Syllabus

Petroleum production system, Properties of oil and natural gas, Multi-phase flows in pipes, Inflow performance, Well deliverability, Forecast of well production, natural flow.

Design and analysis of artificial lift systems, selection procedure, pump classification, Sucker rod pump, pumping units, issues in sucker rod pumps, gas interference, Introduction to Electrical submersible pump, pump and motor assembly, gas separator, failure modes, Progressive cavity pump, metallic and non-metallic stator, Hydraulic pump, jet pump, Gas lift, Continuous and intermittent flow gas lift, gas lift valves, Plunger lift.

Reservoir fluid and produced water composition, fluid production system, sand production, three phase fluid separation, classification of separator, components of separator, design of separator, liquid level control, dehydration, demulsification and desalting of oil, produced water treatment, flow control and metering system, oil and gas storage, safety and control systems.

Text books:

  • Petroleum Production Engineering, B. Guo, WC Lyon and A gambhor, Elsevier, 2007.
  • Gas Well Deliquification, JF Lea, HV Nickens, MR Wells , Elsevier, 2008.
  • Standard handbook of Petroleum and Natural Gas Engineering, W.C. Lyons, Gulf publishing Company.
  • Surface production Operations, Volume 1&2, K Arnold and M Stewart, gulf Publishing Company.
  • Electric Submersible Pump, G. Takacs, Elsevier, 2008.
  • Hand Book for Electric Submersible Pump, Centrilift, 1997.
  • Progressive Cavity Pumps, Downhole Pumps, and Mud Motors, Lev Nelik, Gulf publishing company, TX, 2005.
  • Petroleum and Natural Gas Production Engineering, W.C. Lyons, Elsevier. 2010.
  • Gas Lift Manual, API, 1994.
  • The Technology of Artificial Lift Methods, K.E. Brown, Pennwell Books, Oklahama, 1980.
  • Petroleum Production Systems, Economides et al., Prenticehall, New jersey, 1994.
  • Production Optimization, H.D. Beggs, OGCI and Petroskills Publications, Tulsa-Oklahama, 2003.

Reference books:

Petroleum Engineering hand book, Vol VI. SPE, 2007.

M.Tech Ocean Structures (Regular Stream OE1)
Semester ISemester IISummerSemester IIISemester IVElective
S.No Course No Course Name New Credit System
Lecture Tutorial Extended Tutorial Afternoon Lab Session Time to be spent outside of class Credits in new system
1 OE5050 Ocean Structures and Materials 3 0 0 0 6 9
2 OE5030 Wave Hydrodynamics 3 0 0 1 6 10
4 OE5070 Statistics and Dynamics of Marine Vehicle 3 0 0 1 6 10
3 OE6200 Design of Offshore Structures 3 1 0 0 6 10
6 OE5200 Dynamics of Ocean Structures 3 0 0 0 6 9
5 OE5110 Experimental Methods & Measurements 3 0 0 2 6 11
6 DPE1 Department Elective 1 3 0 0 0 6 9
Total Credits : 60

Wave Hydrodynamics

Objectives

To give an overview about the waves and its kinematics.

Syllabus

Conservation of mass, moment and Energy. Euler Equation – Bernoullis Equation. Potential and Stream function.

Classification of Ocean Waves. Linear wave theory: Governing Equation, Boundary Conditions and solutions, Dispersion relation, Constancy of wave period. Wave Kinematics : Wave celerity, water particle velocities, accelerations, displacements and pressures. Approximations for deep and shallow water conditions. Integral properties of waves: Mass flux, Energy and energy flux, Group speed, Momentum and momentum flux. Wave Transformations: Shoaling, bottom friction and damping, refraction, reflection and diffraction. Wave Breaking: Type of breaking, Surf similarity parameter. Keulegan-Carpenter number, Ursell Parameter, Scattering parameter, Reynolds Number. Wave Loads: Non breaking wave forces on slender structures – Morison equation; Diffraction theory, source distribution method-Introduction to non-linear wave theories-Strokes, Cnoidal and Solitary wave theory. Mass transport velocity. Introduction to Random and directional waves.

Laboratory:

  1. Wave Length, Profile and group velocity;
  2. Wave profile trajectories – progressive and standing waves;
  3. Pressure variations as a function of wave height, water depth and wave period;
  4. Wave reflections.
  5. Force measurements.

References:

Ippen, A.T., Estuary and Coastline Hydrodynamics, McGraw-Hill Book Company, inc., New York, 1978

Dean, R.G. and Dalrymple, R.A., Water wave mechanics for Engineers and Scientists, Prentice-Hall, Inc., Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey, 1994

Sarpkaya, T. and Isaacson, M., Mechanics of Wave Forces on Offshore Structures, Van Nostrand Reinhold Co., New York, 1981

Shore Protection Manual Volume I and II, Coastal Engineering Research Centre, Dept, of the Army, US Army Corps of Engineers, Washington DC, 1984

Weigel, R.L.Oceanographical Engineering, Prenticxe Hall Inc, 1982.

Sorenson, R.M., Basic Coastal Engineering, A Wiley-Interscience Publication, New York, 1978.

Design of Offshore Structures

Objectives

The course syllabus is revised to suit both regular and user oriented post-graduate students. The content of the course is designed to explain the principles of design of offshore structures for static, dynamic and accidental loads.

Syllabus

Loads on Offshore Structures

Wind Loads; Wave and Current Loads; Calculation based on Maximum base Shear and Overturning Moments; Design Wave heights and Spectral Definition; Hydrodynamic Coefficients and Marine growth; Fatigue Load Definition and Joint Probability distribution; Seismic Loads;

Concepts of Fixed Platform Jacket and Deck

Jacket concepts, redundant framing arrangement; Launch and Lift jackets; Simple Deck configurations for Lift and float-over installations; In-service and Pre-service Loads and analysis

Steel Tubular Member Design

Principles of WSD and LRFD; Allowable stresses and Partial Safety Factors; Tubular Members, Slenderness effects; Column Buckling, Design for Hydrostatic pressure; Design for combined axial and bending stresses (API RP 2A guidelines);

Tubular Joint Design for Static and Cyclic Loads

Simple tubular joints, design using allowable loads; stress concentration factors; S-N curves and fatigue damage calculations

Design against Accidental Loads (Fire, Blast and Collision)

Behavior of steel at elevated temperature; Fire Rating for Hydrocarbon fire; Design of structures for high temperature; Blast Mitigation-Blast walls; Collision of Boats and energy absorption; Platform survival capacity and Plastic design methods.

Jackup Rigs

Configuration and operation of jackups; Simplified analysis; Spudcan penetration and extraction; Spudcan – pile interaction; Design of jackup legs;

Example and tutorial problems on design of tubular members, Stress concentration factors, fatigue estimation, wave load on structures

Statics and Dynamics of Marine Vehicles

Syllabus

Fluid pressure and centre of pressure – estimation of weight and centre of gravity – conditions of equilibrium – definition of meta-centre – hydrostatic particulars – stability at small angles of inclinations – problems of heel and trim-free surface effect – inclining experiment – stability at large angles – dynamic stability allowable KG – stability criteria – capacity stowage, trim and stability booklet – freeboard – damaged stability.

Oscillations of floating bodies – equations of motion – added mass and moment of inertia, damping coefficients – exciting forces and moments due to waves, effect of forward speed – heave, pitch and roll oscillations – strip theory for ship like forms – prediction of motion in irregular seas – method of model tests.

Experimental Methods and Measurements

Objectives

To give an overview about physical models and different measurement techniques for applications in testing of Ocean, offshore and coastal structures.

Syllabus

Dimensional Analysis with special reference to Model Studies in Hydrodynamic and Ocean Engineering problems. Principles of Similitude. Design of Models and Fabrication. Hydrodynamic test facilities, Wave makers, Wave absorbers, Modeling of Environment: 2-D and 3-D Wave generation, Transfer function, Spurious waves – Sub and Super harmonic corrections. Hydrodynamic models: Short-wave and Long wave hydrodynamic models.

Modeling of fixed offshore structures: Measurement Techniques for Drag and Inertia Forces, floating structures. Modeling of Coastal Structures: Rubble mound Structures.

Laboratory measurement techniques, Basics of instrumentation systems, Different types of transducers and their principles : Strain gauges, potentiometers, LVDT, and velocity probes, Current probes, Inclinometers, Accelerometers and their specifications, Pressure transducers and wave probes, Design of load cells and instrumented systems, Signal conditioning and data acquisition, Sources of noise and errors in instrumentation systems, Filtering, data, and spectral analysis.

Laboratory:

Calibration of the following instruments: Wave probe, LVDT, Accelerometer, Pressure transducer, Load cell, Inclinometer, current probes.

Calibration of wavemaker transfer function; Distorted model scale; Generation of different types of waves; difference in wave generation using 1st order and 2nd order transfer function; natural frequency of system using forced and free vibration test, Case studies.

References:

1. Steven A.Hughes, Physical Models and Laboratory Techniques in Coastal Engineering, World Scientific, Singapore, 1993
2. Chakrabarti, S.K., Offshore Structure Modeling, World Scientific, Singapore, 1994
3. Clayton, B.R. and Bishop, R.E.D., Mechanics of Marine Vehicles, Gulf Publishing Co., USA, 1982
4. Hanna, R.L. and Reed, S.E., Strain Gauge-User’s Handbook, 1992
5. Beckwith,T.G., Marangoni, R.D. and Lienhard, J.H., Mechanical Measurements, Addison Wesley, USA, 1993
6. Collacot, R.A., Structural Integrity Monitoring, Chapman and Hall, London, 1985

 

S.No Course No Course Name New Credit System
Lecture Tutorial Extended Tutorial Afternoon Lab Session Time to be spent outside of class Credits in new system
1 OE5400 Port and Harbour Structures 3 0 0 0 6 9
2 OE5500 FEM Applied to Ocean Engineering 3 0 0 0 6 9
3 DPE1 Department Elective 1 3 0 0 0 6 9
4 DPE2 Department Elective 2 3 0 0 0 6 9
5 DPE3 Department Elective 3 3 0 0 0 6 9
6 OE5020 Design Project 0 0 0 0 4 4
Total Credits : 50

S.No Course No Course Name New Credit System
Lecture Tutorial Extended Tutorial Afternoon Lab Session Time to be spent outside of class Credits in new system
SUMMER
1 OE6900* Thesis Project 0 0 0 0 20 20
1 OE5020* Design Project 0 0 0 0 4 4
S.No Course No Course Name New Credit System
Lecture Tutorial Extended Tutorial Afternoon Lab Session Time to be spent outside of class Credits in new system
SEMESTER 3
1 OE5012 Deep Sea Technology 3 0 0 0 6 9
1 DPE4 Departmental Elective 4 3 0 0 0 6 9
2 OE6900* Thesis Project 0 0 0 0 20 20
Total Credits : 29
S.No Course No Course Name New Credit System
Lecture Tutorial Extended Tutorial Afternoon Lab Session Time to be spent outside of class Credits in new system
SEMESTER 4
1 OE6900* Thesis Project 0 0 0 0 40 40
Total Credits : 40

* Credits for OE 6900 will be awarded at the end of IV semester
# Credits for OE5020 will be awarded at the end of Summer term.

 

OE5230

Foundations of Offshore structures

3

1

0

0

6

10

OE5300

Dynamics of Floating Bodies

3

0

0

0

6

9

OE5320

Nonlinear Problem in Ocean Engineering

3

0

0

0

6

9

OE5330

Advanced Marine Structures

3

0

0

0

6

9

OE5450

Numerical Techniques in Ocean Hydrodynamics

3

0

3

0

6

12

OE5800

Coastal Engineering

3

0

0

0

6

9

PE6090

HSE Management in Petroleum and Offshore Engineering

3

0

0

0

6

9

OE 6002

Installation of Offshore Structures

3

0

0

0

6

9

OE 6004

Numerical Modeling of Offshore Structures

2

0

0

3

4

9

OE 6001

Materials and Fabrication of Offshore Structures

3

1

0

0

6

10

OE 6005

Reliability of Offshore Structures

3

0

0

0

6

9

OE5970

Structural Health monitoring

3

0

0

0

6

9

OExxxx

Advanced steel design

3

0

0

0

6

9

OE6008

Design, Construction and Operation of LNG Carriers and
Terminals

4

0

0

0

8

12

OE6060

Stochastic structural dynamics applied to ocean engineering

3

0

0

0

6

9

 

ELECTIVES - OTHER DEPARTMENTS

 

 

 

 

 

 

AM6570

Flow Induced Vibration

3

0

0

0

6

9

CE5720

Stability of Structures

3

0

0

0

6

9

MM5320

Corrosion Engineering

3

0

0

0

6

9

AS 5820

Analysis of Plates and Shells

3

0

0

0

6

9

AS 5860

Composite Structures

3

0

0

0

6

9

CE5630

Advanced theory and design of Concrete structures

3

1

0

0

6

10

M.Tech Ocean Technology (NIOT UOP - OE2)
Semester ISemester IISummerSemester IIISemester IVElectivesElectives other Department

S.No Course No Course Name New Credit System
Lecture Tutorial Extended Tutorial Afternoon Lab Session Time to be spent outside of class Credits in new system
1 OE5010 Oceanography 3 0 0 1 6 10
2 OE5030 Wave Hydrodynamics 3 0 0 1 6 10
3 OE6200 Design of Offshore Structures 3 1 0 0 6 10
4 OE5070 Statistics and Dynamics of Marine Vehicle 3 0 0 1 6 10
5 OE5110 Experimental Methods & Measurements 3 0 0 2 6 11
6 DPE1 Department Elective 1 3 0 0 0 6 9
Total Credits : 60
Oceanography

Objectives

To provide a solid foundation for students for more advanced study in ocean engineering and technology

Syllabus

Introduction to Oceanography – Scientific concepts of its sub-disciplines namely physical, geological, chemical, biological, acoustical and optical oceanography; Understand the complexity of the sea as a natural system with the various physical, chemical, biological, and geological processes.

Physical Oceanography – scientific concepts, seawater and its properties – temperature, salinity, pressure, depth, and density; pressure effects on temperature and density; TS diagrams, water types and water masses; conservative and non-conservative properties; scales of motion; Ocean circulation – Conservation equations and transport processes, momentum balances, geostrophy, large scale circulation, wind-driven circulation, abyssal ocean circulation, boundary currents, friction and Ekman layers; Waves – Origin and evolution, characteristics, classification, Tsunami, Tides – Origin, characteristics, tidal generation forces, equilibrium tide, tidal analysis and prediction, Vorticity – characteristics and types of vortices and their applications; Methods and measurements, observational tools, data analysis and methods; Special topics of current interest (El-nino, global warming, sea-level rise, coastal development, and environmental issues (contamination, oil spills, exploitation) are presented.

Geological Oceanography – Origin of Earth, geodynamics, plate tectonics and Isostasy, continental drift and seafloor spreading, structure and evolution of ocean basins (continental margins, deep abyssal plains, ridges and trenches, sediments); Marine provinces, hypsography, technology; the geochemistry of seawater (salinity, dissolved and particulate matter, nutrient cycles, particulate fluxes and sedimentation); Marine sediments – Formation, types, distribution and classification; Deep-sea currents, processes and deposits; Mineral resources and exploration methods; Coastal morphodynamics and processes, coastal classification; Sea level changes and paleoceanography, important tools and techniques used by geological oceanographers.
Text Books:

  1. Weisberg, and H. Parija, Introductory Oceanography, McGraw Hill, Tokyo, 1974.
  2. M. McCormick, and J.V. Thiruvathukal, Elements of Oceanography, W.B. Saunders Company, Philadelphia, 1976.
  3. A. Ross, Introduction to Oceanography, Prentice-Hall, Inc., London, 1977.
  4. H. Stewart, Introduction to Physical Oceanography, Orange Grove Texts Plus, 2009.

Reference Books:

  1. Marshall and R. Alan Plumb, Atmosphere, Ocean, and Climate Dynamics, Elsevier, 2007.
  2. Pond, and G.L. Pickard, Introductory Dynamical Oceanography, 2nd Edition, Butterworth-Heinemann, 1983.
  3. Medwin, and C.S. Clay, Fundamentals of Acoustical Oceanography (Applications of Modern Acoustics), 1st edition, Academic Press Inc., 1997.
Wave Hydrodynamics

Objectives

To give an overview about the waves and its kinematics.

Syllabus

Conservation of mass, moment and Energy. Euler Equation – Bernoullis Equation. Potential and Stream function.

Classification of Ocean Waves. Linear wave theory: Governing Equation, Boundary Conditions and solutions, Dispersion relation, Constancy of wave period. Wave Kinematics : Wave celerity, water particle velocities, accelerations, displacements and pressures. Approximations for deep and shallow water conditions. Integral properties of waves: Mass flux, Energy and energy flux, Group speed, Momentum and momentum flux. Wave Transformations: Shoaling, bottom friction and damping, refraction, reflection and diffraction. Wave Breaking: Type of breaking, Surf similarity parameter. Keulegan-Carpenter number, Ursell Parameter, Scattering parameter, Reynolds Number. Wave Loads: Non breaking wave forces on slender structures – Morison equation; Diffraction theory, source distribution method-Introduction to non-linear wave theories-Strokes, Cnoidal and Solitary wave theory. Mass transport velocity. Introduction to Random and directional waves.

Laboratory:

  1. Wave Length, Profile and group velocity;
  2. Wave profile trajectories – progressive and standing waves;
  3. Pressure variations as a function of wave height, water depth and wave period;
  4. Wave reflections.
  5. Force measurements.

References:
Ippen, A.T., Estuary and Coastline Hydrodynamics, McGraw-Hill Book Company, inc., New York, 1978

Dean, R.G. and Dalrymple, R.A., Water wave mechanics for Engineers and Scientists, Prentice-Hall, Inc., Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey, 1994

Sarpkaya, T. and Isaacson, M., Mechanics of Wave Forces on Offshore Structures, Van Nostrand Reinhold Co., New York, 1981

Shore Protection Manual Volume I and II, Coastal Engineering Research Centre, Dept, of the Army, US Army Corps of Engineers, Washington DC, 1984

Weigel, R.L.Oceanographical Engineering, Prenticxe Hall Inc, 1982.

Sorenson, R.M., Basic Coastal Engineering, A Wiley-Interscience Publication, New York, 1978.

Design of Offshore Structures

Objectives

The course syllabus is revised to suit both regular and user oriented post-graduate students. The content of the course is designed to explain the principles of design of offshore structures for static, dynamic and accidental loads.

Syllabus

Loads on Offshore Structures

Wind Loads; Wave and Current Loads; Calculation based on Maximum base Shear and Overturning Moments; Design Wave heights and Spectral Definition; Hydrodynamic Coefficients and Marine growth; Fatigue Load Definition and Joint Probability distribution; Seismic Loads;

Concepts of Fixed Platform Jacket and Deck

Jacket concepts, redundant framing arrangement; Launch and Lift jackets; Simple Deck configurations for Lift and float-over installations; In-service and Pre-service Loads and analysis

Steel Tubular Member Design

Principles of WSD and LRFD; Allowable stresses and Partial Safety Factors; Tubular Members, Slenderness effects; Column Buckling, Design for Hydrostatic pressure; Design for combined axial and bending stresses (API RP 2A guidelines);

Tubular Joint Design for Static and Cyclic Loads

Simple tubular joints, design using allowable loads; stress concentration factors; S-N curves and fatigue damage calculations

Design against Accidental Loads (Fire, Blast and Collision)

Behavior of steel at elevated temperature; Fire Rating for Hydrocarbon fire; Design of structures for high temperature; Blast Mitigation-Blast walls; Collision of Boats and energy absorption; Platform survival capacity and Plastic design methods.
Jackup Rigs

Configuration and operation of jackups; Simplified analysis; Spudcan penetration and extraction; Spudcan – pile interaction; Design of jackup legs;

Example and tutorial problems on design of tubular members, Stress concentration factors, fatigue estimation, wave load on structures

Statics and Dynamics of Marine Vehicles

Syllabus

Fluid pressure and centre of pressure – estimation of weight and centre of gravity – conditions of equilibrium – definition of meta-centre – hydrostatic particulars – stability at small angles of inclinations – problems of heel and trim-free surface effect – inclining experiment – stability at large angles – dynamic stability allowable KG – stability criteria – capacity stowage, trim and stability booklet – freeboard – damaged stability.

Oscillations of floating bodies – equations of motion – added mass and moment of inertia, damping coefficients – exciting forces and moments due to waves, effect of forward speed – heave, pitch and roll oscillations – strip theory for ship like forms – prediction of motion in irregular seas – method of model tests.

Experimental Methods and Measurements

Objectives

To give an overview about physical models and different measurement techniques for applications in testing of Ocean, offshore and coastal structures.

Syllabus

Dimensional Analysis with special reference to Model Studies in Hydrodynamic and Ocean Engineering problems. Principles of Similitude. Design of Models and Fabrication. Hydrodynamic test facilities, Wave makers, Wave absorbers, Modeling of Environment: 2-D and 3-D Wave generation, Transfer function, Spurious waves – Sub and Super harmonic corrections. Hydrodynamic models: Short-wave and Long wave hydrodynamic models.

Modeling of fixed offshore structures: Measurement Techniques for Drag and Inertia Forces, floating structures. Modeling of Coastal Structures: Rubble mound Structures.

Laboratory measurement techniques, Basics of instrumentation systems, Different types of transducers and their principles : Strain gauges, potentiometers, LVDT, and velocity probes, Current probes, Inclinometers, Accelerometers and their specifications, Pressure transducers and wave probes, Design of load cells and instrumented systems, Signal conditioning and data acquisition, Sources of noise and errors in instrumentation systems, Filtering, data, and spectral analysis.

Laboratory:

Calibration of the following instruments: Wave probe, LVDT, Accelerometer, Pressure transducer, Load cell, Inclinometer, current probes.
Calibration of wavemaker transfer function; Distorted model scale; Generation of different types of waves; difference in wave generation using 1st order and 2nd order transfer function; natural frequency of system using forced and free vibration test, Case studies.

References:
1. Steven A.Hughes, Physical Models and Laboratory Techniques in Coastal Engineering, World Scientific, Singapore, 1993
2. Chakrabarti, S.K., Offshore Structure Modeling, World Scientific, Singapore, 1994
3. Clayton, B.R. and Bishop, R.E.D., Mechanics of Marine Vehicles, Gulf Publishing Co., USA, 1982
4. Hanna, R.L. and Reed, S.E., Strain Gauge-User’s Handbook, 1992
5. Beckwith,T.G., Marangoni, R.D. and Lienhard, J.H., Mechanical Measurements, Addison Wesley, USA, 1993
6. Collacot, R.A., Structural Integrity Monitoring, Chapman and Hall, London, 1985

S.No Course No Course Name New Credit System
Lecture Tutorial Extended Tutorial Afternoon Lab Session Time to be spent outside of class Credits in new system
1 OE5080 Marine Instrumentation 3 0 0 0 6 9
2 OE5340 Ocean Env. Policy & Coastal Zone Mgmt. 3 0 0 0 6 9
3 OE5341 Marine Survey and Informatics 3 0 0 0 6 9
4 OE5170 Ocean Acoustics 3 0 0 0 6 9
5 DPE2 Department Elective 2 3 0 0 0 6 9
6 DPE3 Department Elective 3 3 0 0 0 6 9
Marine Instrumentation

Objectives

This course focuses on the principles of ocean instrumentation. All instruments consist of the following stages: transduction, signal conditioning, and data observation/analysis. This course describes these principles by using specific instruments such as SONAR, Conductivity Temperature Depth (CTD) profilers, current measurements, Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers (ADCP). In addition to this the course also discusses data analysis for the different measurements recorded by the instruments.

Syllabus

Dynamic response of measuring instruments (with examples), Acoustic instruments and transducers, CTD construction and operation, Expendable ocean instruments, current profilers, and strain gauges, Acoustic positioning systems. Sampling, Spectral Analysis, Basic Filtering, Measuring system response using spectral analysis (magnitude and phase response).

Textbook and Reference Materials

  1. “Mechanical Measurements,” by Thomas G. Beckwith, Roy D. Marangoni, and John H. Lienhard V, 6th Edition, 2009 ISBN 9780122274305 published by Prentice Hall
  2. James Irish, and Albert Williams III. 2.693 “Principles of Oceanographic Instrument Systems – Sensors and Measurements (13.998)”, Spring 2004. (Massachusetts Institute of Technology: MIT OpenCourseWare), http://ocw.mit.edu (Accessed 30 Jan, 2015). License: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA
  3. “Encyclopedia of OceanSciences” 2nd Edition Six Volumes set, 2009ISBN9780122274305 published by Academic Press
Ocean Env. Policy & Coastal Zone Management

Objectives

To give students firm knowledge of ocean policies and laws and CZM techniques to preserve coastal and ocean water quality and ecosystems.

Syllabus

Functions and utility of the Ocean environment; Essential parameters to frame Ocean Policy, regulation and laws; Sources of Ocean/ Marine pollution, their containment mitigation and impact on environmental degradation; pollution in Coastal Zones; Concept of sustainability with regard to marine environment.

Resources of the ocean both living and non-living, Management and Economic issues of resources. Exploration and exploitation of ocean resources in relation to utilisation and marine policy.

Ocean governance; the international law commission of 1950; Geneva Convention – 1958; Conventions on the Territorial sea and contiguous zone; the Continental shelf; the high seas and on fishing and conservation of living resources of the high seas.

Law of the sea – UNCLOS; most innovative components of the convention; importance of Exclusive economic zone (EEZ), a new regime for marine scientific research and its role on sustainable development; the principles of common heritage of mankind and reservation for peaceful purposes dealing with both.

Post UNCLOS developments; UNCLOS and UNCED; Analyses and synthesis of agenda 21; Chapter 17 of UNCED; Marine sciences and Technologies in the new Ocean regime. Ocean governance in coastal states.

Requirement for coastal zone management; Concept of integrated coastal zone management (ICZM) systems approach to ICZM; Coastal zone Regulations and their importance.

 

Text Books:

 

  1. E. Frankel, Ocean Environmental Management, Prentice Hall PTR, Englewood Cliffs, Now Jersey, 1995.
  2. E.M. Brogese, Ocean Governance and the United Nations, Centre of Foreign

Policy Studies, Dalhousie University, Halifax, 1995.

  1. Luc Cuyvers, Ocean Uses and their Regulation, Wiley Interscience, John Wiley and Sons, 1984.
  2. R.R. Churchill and A.V. Lowe. The law of the sea. Manchester: Manchester House, 1987.

 

Reference Books:

 

  1. B. Cicin – Sain and R.W. Knecht, Integrated Coastal and Ocean Management, Island Press, Washington, 1998.
  2. United Nations Conference on Environment and Development. ” Protection of the Oceans, all Kinds of Seas, including enclosed and semi – Enclosed Seas, and Coastal Areas and the Protection, Rational Use and Development of their Living Resoures ” Agrnda 21, Chapter 17. Rio de Janerio, 14 June 1992
  3. United Nations, 48th Session. Agreement relating to the implementation of Part XI of the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea of 1982, 17 August 1994, A/RES/48/263.
  4. World Commission on Environment and Development. Our Common Future. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1987 (also Know as the Bruntland Report).

Sustainabl Development, Science and Policy – The Conference Oslo: The Norwegian Research Council for Science and the Humanities, August 1990.

Marine Survey and Informatics

Objectives

To acquire fundamental knowledge and theoretical aspects of marine survey and informatics technology that will benefit research programs and implementation of various marine projects.

Syllabus

Introduction: Fundamentals of Marine Surveying, the marine environment , marine resources and their recovery, data acquisition. Geodesy : Definition and classification – geometry of ellipsoid – various co-ordinate systems – spherical excess – geoid and deflection of vertical, various height systems – rectangular and polar coordinates. Geodetic computation.

Control Surveying: basic parameters of survey measurements – time, distance and angles – use of optical systems, electro-optical systems and electronic systems – Total station. Satellite systems – GPS, Differential GPS, GLONASS – static and Kinematics GPS surveys – software modules – applications of GPS. Horizontal and Vertical controls – methods.

Tides: Theory of tides – tidal datum – tide gauges – processing land and marine survey datum. Soundings: Acoustic Positioning, long, short and ultra short base line systems – constructions, basic measurements, calibration and maintenance. Sounding methods, reduction of sounding and plotting.

Introduction to geo-information science and technology, basic elements and potential applications

Remote sensing: Introduction, principles of remote sensing, EMR interaction with atmosphere and earth materials, platforms – Airborne, space borne, Ocean satellite sensors – Active and passive – Optical sensors, thermal sensors, microwave sensors, LIDAR, Retrieval algorithms and Applications, digital image processing. Data management systems : DBMS, Knowledge based system – geographic data bases – GIS – introduction – raster data and vector data structure – digital elevation models

 

Text Books:

 

  1. W. Torge, Geodesy, De Gruyter, Berlin, 1991
  2. A.E. Ingham, Sea Surveying, John Wiley & Sons, 1975
  3. A. Thomas, Handbook of Marine Surveying, 2nd Edition, Sheridan Publisher, UK
  4. Ian S. Robinson, Measuring the oceans from Space: The principles and methods of satellite oceanography, Praxis Publishing, UK, 2004

 

Reference Books:

 

    1. Alfred Leick, GPS Satellite Surveying, John Wiley & Sons, 1995

 

  1. Lillesand T.M. and Kiefer R.W., Remote Sensing and Image Interpretation, John Wiley and Sons, Inc New York, 1999.
  2. Franks S. Marzanic, Remote Sensing of atmosphere and Ocean from Space : Models, Instruments and Techniques, Kulwer Academic Publisher 2002
  3. Seelye Martin, An Introduction to Ocean Remote Sensing, Cambridge University Press, UK, 2004
Ocean Acoustics

Objectives

The objective of the course is to introduce principles and properties of underwater acoustics through formulation and analysis of transmission, reflection, absorption, attenuation of sound waves in the ocean including boundary and stratification effects.

 

Syllabus

  1. Introduction. Physical properties of sea water. Effects of density, salinity and temperature on sound speed. Underwater sound channels (USC). Surface and bottom effects. Ambient noise.
  2. Sound Propagation: Wave equation;Helmholtz equation; Lighthill’s acoustic analogy; Point source and plane wave solutions; Refraction of sound waves; Snell’s Law; Caustics and shadow zones; Ray theory.
  • Reflection and Transmission: Changes at an interface between to immiscible liquids. Transmission of sound from air to water and vice versa; Reflection from ocean bottom; Propagation of sound in shallow water.
  1. Sound propagation in Underwater Sound Channel (USC): Ray theory for USC; Munk’s model; Acoustic field as sum of normal modes; Analysis based on a parabolic equation,
  2. Scattering of Sound: Scattering at rough boundary surfaces; Method of small perturbation (MSP); Scattering of sound by surface waves and internal waves.
  3. Sound Radiation: Generation of sound by marine vehicles and offshore platforms.
  • Acoustics Applications: Remote sensing; Underwater communication; Sonar principle and use; Acoustic tomography; Geophysical seismic exploration.

Reference Books and Notes:

 

  1. M. Brekhovskikh and Yu. P. Lysanov, “Fundamentals of Ocean Acoustics,” Springer Series on Wave Phenomena (Edited by L.B. Felsen), Springer-Verlag, 1982.
  2. Kinsler, Frey, Coppens and Sanders, “Fundamentals of Acoustics”, 4th edition, 1999.
  3. Class and lecture notes

 

 

S.No Course No Course Name New Credit System
Lecture Tutorial Extended Tutorial Afternoon Lab Session Time to be spent outside of class Credits in new system
1 OE 5190* Practical training 0 0 0 0 16 16

 

S.No Course No Course Name New Credit System
Lecture Tutorial Extended Tutorial Afternoon Lab Session Time to be spent outside of class Credits in new system
3 OE6901* Project 0 0 0 0 16 16
4 DPE4 Department Elective 4 3 0 0 0 6 9
5 DPE5 Department Elective 5 3 0 0 0 6 9
Total Credits : 34
S.No Course No Course Name New Credit System
Lecture Tutorial Extended Tutorial Afternoon Lab Session Time to be spent outside of class Credits in new system
1 OE6901* Project 0 0 0 0 40 40
Total Credits : 40
COURSE NO COURSE NAME L T ET ALS TIME(OUT OF CLASS) CREDIT
OE5200 Dynamics of Ocean Structures 3 0 0 0 6 9
OE5210 Port Planning and Development 3 0 0 0 6 9
OE5300 Dynamics of Floating Bodies 3 0 0 0 6 9
OE5310 Guidance & Control of Marine Vehicles 3 0 0 0 6 9
OE5320 Nonlinear Problem in Ocean Engineering 3 0 0 0 6 9
OE5330 Advanced Marine Structures 3 0 0 0 6 9
OE5340 Ocean Environmental Policy & Coastal Zone Management 3 0 0 0 6 9
OE5400 Port and Harbour Structures 3 0 0 0 6 9
OE5450 Numerical Techniques in Ocean Hydrodynamics 3 1 0 0 6 10
OE5500 FEM applied to Ocean Engineering 3 0 0 0 6 9
OE5600 Advanced Wave Dynamics 3 0 0 0 6 9
OE5800 Coastal Engineering 3 0 0 0 6 9
OE6200 Design of Offshore Structures 3 1 0 0 6 10
OE6300 Plated Structures and Shells 3 0 0 0 6 9
OE6980 Comp. Aid. Surface Dev. for Marine Vehicles 3 1 1 0 6 11
OE6990 Advanced Marine Vehicles 3 0 0 0 6 9
OE6020 Meshfree methods applied to hydrodynamics 3 0 3 0 6 12
PE6020 Drilling Technology 3 0 0 1 6 10
PE6090 HSE Management in Petroleum and Offshore Engineering 3 0 0 0 6 9
PE6320 Subsea Engineering for oil and gas fields 3 0 0 0 6 9
OE 5050 Ocean Structures and Materials 3 0 0 0 6 9
OE 6002 Installation of Offshore Structures 3 0 0 0 6 9
OE 6004 Numerical Modeling of Offshore Structures 2 0 0 3 4 9
OE 6001 Materials and Fabrication of Offshore Structures 3 1 0 0 6 10
OE6990 Advance marine vehicle 3 0 0 0 6 9
Dynamics of Ocean structures

Objectives

The course will give a brief overview of different types of ocean structures that are deployed in sea for exploiting oil, gas and minerals. While fundamentals of structural dynamics are discussed, detailed mathematical modeling of ocean structures and their dynamic analysis under waves, wind and current are highlighted. Special emphasis will be laid to the fluid-structure interaction. Introduction to stochastic dynamics of ocean structures is also discussed with lot of tutorials and sample papers that shall intuit self-learning through the course. Focus is on the explanation of fundamental concepts as addressed to graduate students.

Syllabus

Unit 1: Fundamentals of Structural dynamics

Introduction to different types of ocean structures-Development of structural forms for deep and ultra-deep waters-Environmental forces-

Introduction to structural dynamics- single degree-of-freedom model- Free and forced vibration- Undamped and damped systems- damped and undamped forced vibration- Two degrees-of-freedom systems and MDOF systems- Natural frequencies and mode shapes- Stodla, Rayleigh-Ritz and influence coefficient methods, Dunkerley- Continuous systems- Duhamel integral- Rayleigh Ritz method- Matrix methods for dynamic analysis- Modal response method- Modal mass contribution- Missing mass correction

 

Unit 2: Application of structural dynamics to offshore structures

Fluid-structure interaction- Dynamic analysis of offshore jacket platforms- Dynamic analysis of articulated towers- Iterative frequency domain- Multi-legged articulated towers(MLAT)- Tension Leg Platforms and geometric optimization- Dynamic analysis methodology of offshore structures under earthquake loads- Development of new generation offshore structures- Buoyant Leg Structures and offshore triceratops- Dynamic analysis of compliant offshore structures under extreme waves (springing and ringing responses)- Stability analysis of offshore compliant structures- Hydrodynamic performance of perforated cylinders under regular waves- Structural health monitoring of offshore platforms using WSN (wireless sensor networking)

 

Unit 3: Introduction to stochastic dynamics

Introduction to stochastic dynamics of ocean structures- Random environmental processes- Response spectrum- Narrow band process- Return period- Fatigue prediction

 

Text Books:

 

  1. Arvid Naess and Torgeir Moan. 2013. Stochastic dynamics of marine structures, Cambridge University Press, New York, USA.
  2. Dawson, T. H., 1983. Offshore Structural Engineering: Prentice-Hall Inc.
  3. I. H and Incecik. A 2004. Dynamics of double articulated towers, Integrity of offshore structures- 4: Elsevier.
  4. Hsu, H.T. 1981. Applied Offshore Structural Engineering: Gulf Publishing Co., Houston.
  5. Mather, A. 2000. Offshore Engineering: an Introduction, 2nd edn: Witherby
  6. Patel, M. H., 1989. Dynamics of offshore structures: Butterworths, London.
  7. Srinivasan Chandrasekaran. 2015a. Dynamic analysis and design of ocean structures. Springer, INDIA, ISBN: 978-81-322-2276-7.
  8. Srinivasan Chandrasekaran. 2015b. Advanced Marine structures, CRC Press, Florida (USA), ISBN 9781498739689.
  9. Srinivasan Chandrasekaran. 2016. Offshore structural engineering: Reliability and Risk Assessment. CRC Press, Florida, ISBN:978-14-987-6519-0.
  10. Srinivasan Chandrasekaran and A.K.Jain. 2016. Ocean structures: Construction, Materials and Operations, CRC Press, Florida, ISBN: 978-14-987-9742-9.

 

Reference Books:

 

  1. Anil K. Chopra. 2003. Dynamics of structures: Theory and applications to earthquake Engineering: Pearson Education, Singapore.
  2. Chakrabarti, S. K. 1987. Hydrodynamics of Offshore Structures: Computational Mechanics.
  3. Chakrabarti, S. K. 1990. Non-linear method in offshore engineering, Elsevier Science Publisher, The Netherlands.
  4. Chakrabarti, S. K. 1994.Offshore Structure Modeling: World Scientific.
  5. Clauss, G. T. et al. 1992. Offshore Structures, Vol 1 – Conceptual Design and Hydromechanics: Springer, London.
  6. Gerwick, B.C.Jr. 1986. Construction of Offshore Structures: John Wiley, New York.
  7. Graff, W.J. 1981. Introduction to offshore structures: Design, fabrication and installation: Gulf Publishing Co, Tokyo.
  8. Graff, W.J. 1981. Introduction to Offshore Structures: Gulf Publishing Co., Houston.
  9. Hiroshi Iwaski. 1981. Preliminary design Study of Tension Leg platform: MIT university.
  10. Sadehi, K. 1989. Design and analysis of Marine structures: Khajeh Nasirroddin Tsi University of Technology, Tehran, Iran.
  11. Sarpkaya, T. and Isaacson, M. 1981. Mechanics of Wave Forces on Offshore Structures: Van Nostrand Reinhold.
  12. Srinivasan Chandrasekaran and Subrata Kumar Bhattacharyya. 2012. Analysis and Design of Offshore Structures with illustrated examples. Human Resource Development Center for Offshore and Plant Engineering (HOPE Center), Changwon National University Press, Republic of Korea ISBN: 978-89-963915-5-5, pp. 285.
  13. Srinivasan Chandrasekaran. 2014. Advanced Theory on Offshore Plant FEED Engineering, Changwon National University, Republic of South Korea, pp. 237. ISBN:978-89-969792-8-9
Dynamics of Floating Bodies

Syllabus

Equations of motion for SDOF systems, time and frequency domain solutions – oscillations of floating bodies, added mass and moment of inertia, and hydrodynamic damping – Exciting forces and moments due to waves – Strip theory for slender bodies – Symmetric & unsymmetric coupled motions – Effect of forward speed-3D effects – Dynamic effects – Roll and pitch damping devices – probabilistic approach- Introduction to random response theory – Random response of linear systems under wave loading, directional spectra for waves Probabilistic design criteria – General motion analysis of floating bodies, time and frequency domain approaches.

Non Linear Problems in Ocean Engineering

Syllabus

Conservative and nonconservative systems, Quadratic and cubic nonlinearities, Nonlinear damping, Forced oscillations, Sub and Superharmonic responses, Parametrically excited systems, Chaotic motion, System identification.

Nonlinear wave theories and wave loading, Nonlinear models of compliant platforms and soil-structure interaction, Risers and moorings, Nonlinear wave loading on large floating systems, Slow drift oscillation, Random response and statistical analysis.

 

Advanced Marine Structures

Objectives

The course will give a brief overview of Ultimate load design principles and plastic capacity of sections Capacity estimate of tubular joints under axial, flexural and torsional buckling will be discussed. Fundamentals of impact analysis and its application to collision problems on marine structures will be also highlighted. A brief section on fluid-structure interaction highlighting flow induced vibration will be presented. Introductory topics on reliability of marine structures including FOSM and AFSOM methods will be also discussed. Concepts of fatigue analysis and design of marine structures will be presented. The focus is on detailed explanation of topics through numerical examples.

Syllabus

Module 1: Ultimate load design: Principles and factors affecting the strength. Fundamentals of plastic analysis of sections- estimate of plastic capacity of beams and frames- application to marine structures. Theories of failure- Capacity estimate of tubular joints under axial, flexural and torsional buckling-design examples. Fundamentals of impact analysis

Module 2: Fluid-structure interaction- elements of flow-induced vibration- Flow through perforated members

Module 3: Introduction to reliability of marine structures- Reliability concepts and methods- FOSM and AFSOM methods

Module 4: Fatigue and fracture- fatigue failure- cumulative fatigue damage models- fatigue analysis and design of marine structures-spectral fatigue damage

 

Text Books:

 

  1. Arvid Naess and Torgeir Moan. 2013. Stochastic dynamics of marine structures, Cambridge University Press, New York, USA.
  2. Chaudhary, G.K and Dover, W.D. 1985. Fatigue analysis of offshore platforms subjected to sea wave loading, Int. J. Fatigue, 7.
  3. Gerwick, B.C.Jr. 1986. Construction of Offshore Structures: John Wiley, New York.
  4. Haldar, A., and Mahadevan, S. 2000. Probability, reliability and statistical methods in engineering design. John Wiley and Sons, New York.
  5. Hsu, H.T. 1981. Applied Offshore Structural Engineering: Gulf Publishing Co., Houston.
  6. Melchers RE. (1999). Structural reliability: analysis and prediction, 2nd Edition, John Wiley.
  7. Papoulis, A. and Pillai, SU (1991). Probability, random variables and stochastic processes, 3rd Edition, McGraw-Hill, New York.
  8. Srinivasan Chandrasekaran. 2015a. Dynamic analysis and design of ocean structures. Springer, INDIA, ISBN: 978-81-322-2276-7.
  9. Srinivasan Chandrasekaran. 2015b. Advanced Marine structures, CRC Press, Florida (USA), ISBN 9781498739689.
  10. Srinivasan Chandrasekaran. 2016. Offshore structural engineering: Reliability and Risk Assessment. CRC Press, Florida, ISBN:978-14-987-6519-0.
  11. Srinivasan Chandrasekaran and A.K.Jain. 2016. Ocean structures: Construction, Materials and Operations, CRC Press, Florida, ISBN: 978-14-987-9742-9.
  12. Throft-Christensen, P. and Baker,M. (1982). Structural reliability theory and applications, Springer Verlag, Berlin.
  13. Wirsching, P., Palz K. Ortiz. 2006. Random vibration: Theory and Practice, Dover, NY.

 

Reference Books:

 

  1. Ang, AHS and Tang, WH. 1975. Probability concepts in engineering and design, Volume 1 – Basic concepts, John Wiley, NY
  2. Ang, AHS and Tang, WH. 1975. Probability concepts in engineering and design, Volume 2 – Basic concepts, John Wiley, NY
  3. ASTM E 1049-85. 2005. Rain flow counting method, 1987.
  4. Benjamin, JR and Cornell, CA. 1970. Probability, statistics and decisions for civil engineers, John Wiley, New York.
  5. Chakrabarti, S. K. 1987. Hydrodynamics of Offshore Structures: Computational Mechanics.
  6. Chakrabarti, S. K. 1990. Non-linear method in offshore engineering, Elsevier Science Publisher, The Netherlands.
  7. Chakrabarti, S. K. 1994.Offshore Structure Modeling: World Scientific.
  8. Clauss, G. T. et al. 1992. Offshore Structures, Vol 1 – Conceptual Design and Hydromechanics: Springer, London.
  9. Dawson, T. H., 1983. Offshore Structural Engineering: Prentice-Hall Inc.
  10. Graff, W.J. 1981. Introduction to offshore structures: Design, fabrication and installation: Gulf Publishing Co, Tokyo.
  11. Graff, W.J. 1981. Introduction to Offshore Structures: Gulf Publishing Co., Houston.
  12. John S. Popovics, Jerzy Zemajtis and Iosif Shkolnik. 2008. Studies on static and dynamic modulus of elasticity, ACI-CRC report.
  13. Kam, J.C.P and Dover, W.D. 1989. Advanced tool for fast assessment of fatigue under offshore random wave stress hostory, INtn of Engrs, Part. 2, 87:539-556.
  14. Kam, J.C.P. and Dover, W.D. 1988. Fast fatigue assessment procedure for offshore structure under random time history, Proc. Institution of Civil Engineers, Part 2, 85:689-700.
  15. Love A.E.H. 1994. Mathematical theory of elasticity,, Dover publications Inc, NY.
  16. Madsen, HO, Krenk, S. and NC Lind, NC. (2006). Methods of structural safety, Dover.
  17. Mather, A. 2000. Offshore Engineering: an Introduction, 2nd edn: Witherby
  18. Matsuishi, M. and T. Endo. 1968. Fatigue of metals subjected to varying stresses, Japan Soc. of Mech. Engrs, Fukuoka, Japan, 3:37-40.
  19. Neviele, A. M. 1997. Properties of concrete, 4th Ed, JOhn Wiley & Sons, NY.
  20. Sadehi, K. 1989. Design and analysis of Marine structures: Khajeh Nasirroddin Tsi University of Technology, Tehran, Iran.
  21. Sarpkaya, T. and Isaacson, M. 1981. Mechanics of Wave Forces on Offshore Structures: Van Nostrand Reinhold.
  22. Srinivasan Chandrasekaran and Subrata Kumar Bhattacharyya. 2012. Analysis and Design of Offshore Structures with illustrated examples. Human Resource Development Center for Offshore and Plant Engineering (HOPE Center), Changwon National University Press, Republic of Korea ISBN: 978-89-963915-5-5.
  23. Srinivasan Chandrasekaran. 2014. Advanced Theory on Offshore Plant FEED Engineering, Changwon National University, Republic of South Korea, pp. 237. ISBN:978-89-969792-8-9
Ocean Env. Policy & Coastal Zone Management

Objectives

To give students firm knowledge of ocean policies and laws and CZM techniques to preserve coastal and ocean water quality and ecosystems.

Syllabus

Functions and utility of the Ocean environment; Essential parameters to frame Ocean Policy, regulation and laws; Sources of Ocean/ Marine pollution, their containment mitigation and impact on environmental degradation; pollution in Coastal Zones; Concept of sustainability with regard to marine environment.

Resources of the ocean both living and non-living, Management and Economic issues of resources. Exploration and exploitation of ocean resources in relation to utilisation and marine policy.

Ocean governance; the international law commission of 1950; Geneva Convention – 1958; Conventions on the Territorial sea and contiguous zone; the Continental shelf; the high seas and on fishing and conservation of living resources of the high seas.

Law of the sea – UNCLOS; most innovative components of the convention; importance of Exclusive economic zone (EEZ), a new regime for marine scientific research and its role on sustainable development; the principles of common heritage of mankind and reservation for peaceful purposes dealing with both.

Post UNCLOS developments; UNCLOS and UNCED; Analyses and synthesis of agenda 21; Chapter 17 of UNCED; Marine sciences and Technologies in the new Ocean regime. Ocean governance in coastal states.

Requirement for coastal zone management; Concept of integrated coastal zone management (ICZM) systems approach to ICZM; Coastal zone Regulations and their importance.

 

Text Books:

 

  1. E. Frankel, Ocean Environmental Management, Prentice Hall PTR, Englewood Cliffs, Now Jersey, 1995.
  2. E.M. Brogese, Ocean Governance and the United Nations, Centre of Foreign

Policy Studies, Dalhousie University, Halifax, 1995.

  1. Luc Cuyvers, Ocean Uses and their Regulation, Wiley Interscience, John Wiley and Sons, 1984.
  2. R.R. Churchill and A.V. Lowe. The law of the sea. Manchester: Manchester House, 1987.

 

Reference Books:

 

  1. B. Cicin – Sain and R.W. Knecht, Integrated Coastal and Ocean Management, Island Press, Washington, 1998.
  2. United Nations Conference on Environment and Development. ” Protection of the Oceans, all Kinds of Seas, including enclosed and semi – Enclosed Seas, and Coastal Areas and the Protection, Rational Use and Development of their Living Resoures ” Agrnda 21, Chapter 17. Rio de Janerio, 14 June 1992
  3. United Nations, 48th Session. Agreement relating to the implementation of Part XI of the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea of 1982, 17 August 1994, A/RES/48/263.
  4. World Commission on Environment and Development. Our Common Future. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1987 (also Know as the Bruntland Report).
  5. Sustainabl Development, Science and Policy – The Conference Oslo: The Norwegian Research Council for Science and the Humanities, August 1990.
Port and Harbour Structures

Syllabus

Estimation of loads, Analysis, design and construction of Post Structures – Breakwaters, Jetties, Wharves, Quays, Diaphragm Walls, Slipways, Docks. Offshore terminals and islands – fenders and Mooring Facilities.

Limit state and working stress method of design, crack width calculations. Integrity analysis of berthing structures. Case studies of breackwater failures and other types of structures. Partial safety Factors. Codal Requirements

Numerical Techniques in Ocean Hydrodynamics

Objectives

This course is aimed at capability building in students in hydrodyamic computation and code development using traditional and contemporary models. Students are required to carry out a number of basic numerical and advanced hydrodynamic formulations and code development.

Syllabus

Revisit Fluid Dynamics fundamentals. Numerical solution of Diffusion, Advection and Burgers’ equations . Requirements of numerical solutions – Lax theorem; linear stability analysis. Introduction to CFD concepts: Pressure elimination, Pressure correction and Split algorithms; modeling of turbulence; introduction to LES, DES and DNS. Computations in solution of PDEs, Pressure elimination and Pressure correction. Introduction to computations using unstructured meshes.

Introduction to Numerical Marine Hydrodynamics: Partial differential equations of inviscid hydrodynamics; Code development and computations of hydrodynamics of wave-structure interaction for fixed and floating bodies using BIEM, BEM and FEM techniques; Application of Fast methods; Time domain computation – non-linear velocity potential and acceleration potential approaches. Free surface computation in viscous models – VOF and Levelset. Computation of the motions of ships in waves. Forward speed problem and computation. Integral boundary layer equations and numerical solutions.

Introduction to Parallel Machines and High Performance Computing.

Text Books: NIL

Reference Books: Anderson, D. Computational Fluid Dynamics, McGraw Hill International Editions, 1995. Tannehill, C., Anderson, D and Pletcher, R. Computational Fluid Mechanics and Heat Transfer, 1997. Newman, JN. Marine Hydrodynamics, MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, 1977. Journal and thesis publications and prescribed by teacher.

FEM Applied to Ocean Engineering

Objectives

To familiarize the application of FE techniques in the field of Ocean Hydrodynamics with emphasis on all key elements of the method.

 

Syllabus

Introduction – Different approaches to finite element formulation – Different types of element and interpolation functions, Lagrange & Hermite Polynomials, natural co-ordinates – Derivation of element property matrices – Assembly – solution of finite element equations – Structural and geotechnical problems – Nonlinear analysis.

 

Application to fluid mechanics problems, Fluid-structure interaction – Diffraction of waves, 2D formulation using mild – slope equation – use of infinite elements – Added mass and damping matrices for floating bodies, 2D formulation – Harbour resonance, Liquid sloshing – Vibrations of underwater structures

 

Introduction to Particle based methods/ Lattice Boltzmann Method.

 

 

Text Books:

  • N. Reddy. 1984. An Introduction to the finite element method. McGraw Hill. (third edition, 2005)
  • C. Zienkiewicz, R.W. Lewis and K.G. Stagg (eds.) 1978. Numerical methods in Offshore Engineering. Wiley.

 

Reference Books:

  • D. Cook. 1981. Concepts and applications of finite element analysis. Wiley.
  • C. Zienkiewicz. 1977. The Finite Element Method. McGraw Hill. (vol.I, II, III)
  • J. Bathe. 1981. FE procedures in Engineering Analysis.

 

Advanced Wave Dynamics

Objectives

This course introduces various approaches to description of random nature of ocean waves. The focus will be on characterization of various sea types. The course would deal with stationary processes before moving on to non-stationary process. The linear wave analysis will include both long crested and short crested sea states. Salient nonlinear spectral analysis will be taught in the next stage.

Syllabus

  • Introduction to wave generation, SMB and CEM approaches of wave estimation.
  • Elements of probability theory and random processes – Sea as a stationary random process – Description of random sea waves – Statistical and Spectral analysis – Short term and Long term wave statistics – Directional Spectra – Design wave spectrum – Extreme value prediction.
  • Non-stationary waves: Wavelet transforms and principal component analysis; Univariate and multivariate spectral analysis of signals; Hilbert transform; Bi-spectral analysis of nonlinear waves.
  • Laboratory wave simulation, measurement & analysis: Wave groups, Breaking waves, Stokes 2nd order & Shallow water waves such as Cnoidal and Solitary waves.
  • Multi-Directional waves – simulation and analysis using Fourier Method, MLM & MEM – single point measurement and array of gauges.

References:

  • Chakrabarti S K: Offshore Structure & Modeling, World Scientific, 1994.
  • Ochi M K.: Ocean Waves – The Stochastic Approach- Cambridge University Press, 1998.
  • Dean R G and Dalrymple R A: Water wave mechanics for engineers and scientists, World scientific (Allied Publishers, 2000).
  • Goda: Random seas.
Coastal Engineering

Objectives

To cover the behavior of waves and sediments in the near shore region and their application to coastal Engineering practice with a few case studies.

 

Syllabus

Waves in shallow waters – Shoaling, refraction, diffraction and breaking– Interaction currents and waves- near shore currents-wave run-up and overtopping- coastal sediment characteristics- Initiation of sediment motion under waves- Radiation stress-wave set-up and wave set- down- mechanics of coastal sediment transport – Limits for littoral drift – Suspended and Bed Load – alongshore sediment transport rate – Distribution of alongshore currents and Sediment transport rates in Surf zone. Physical modeling in Coastal Engineering. Onshore offshore sediment transport – Stability of tidal inlets- Coastal features – Beach Features – Beach cycles – Beach Stability – Beach profiles -Coastal erosion, Planning and methods of coast protection works – Design of shore defense structures – Non-breaking and breaking wave forces on coastal structures -Breakwaters- Classification, Design and application in coastal protection and harbor planning- Case studies on coastal erosion and protection-Generation, propagation and effect of tsunami

Text Books:

 

Horikawa,K., Coastal Engineering, University of Tokyo press, 1978

Sorenson, R.M., Basic Coastal Engineering, A Wiley-Interscience Publication, New York, 1978

Kamphius,J.W. Introduction to coastal Engineering and Management, Advances on Ocean Engineering-Volume 16, World Scientific,2002.

 

References:

 

Reeve,D., Chadwick, A. and Fleming, C. Coastal Engineering-Processes, theory and design practice, Spon Press, Taylor & Francis Group, London & Paris,2004

Silvester,R. and Hsu,J.R.C. Coastal Stabilisation, Advances on Ocean Engineering-Volume 14, World Scientific, 1997.

Coastal Engineering Manual, U.S.Army Corps of Engineers, Washington, DC 20314-1000,, Vol. 1 to 3, July 2003.

Wood,M., Coastal Hydraulics: Mcmillan, Civil Engineering Hydraulics, London, 1969

Decisions.” CIFE Technical Report (177), Stanford University, Stanford.

Design of Offshore Structures

Objectives

The course syllabus is revised to suit both regular and user oriented post-graduate students. The content of the course is designed to explain the principles of design of offshore structures for static, dynamic and accidental loads.

Syllabus

Loads on Offshore Structures

Wind Loads; Wave and Current Loads; Calculation based on Maximum base Shear and Overturning Moments; Design Wave heights and Spectral Definition; Hydrodynamic Coefficients and Marine growth; Fatigue Load Definition and Joint Probability distribution; Seismic Loads;

 

Concepts of Fixed Platform Jacket and Deck

Jacket concepts, redundant framing arrangement; Launch and Lift jackets; Simple Deck configurations for Lift and float-over installations; In-service and Pre-service Loads and analysis

 

Steel Tubular Member Design

Principles of WSD and LRFD; Allowable stresses and Partial Safety Factors; Tubular Members, Slenderness effects; Column Buckling, Design for Hydrostatic pressure; Design for combined axial and bending stresses (API RP 2A guidelines);

 

Tubular Joint Design for Static and Cyclic Loads

Simple tubular joints, design using allowable loads; stress concentration factors; S-N curves and fatigue damage calculations

 

Design against Accidental Loads (Fire, Blast and Collision)

Behavior of steel at elevated temperature; Fire Rating for Hydrocarbon fire; Design of structures for high temperature; Blast Mitigation-Blast walls; Collision of Boats and energy absorption; Platform survival capacity and Plastic design methods.

 

Jackup Rigs

Configuration and operation of jackups; Simplified analysis; Spudcan penetration and extraction; Spudcan – pile interaction; Design of jackup legs;

 

Example and tutorial problems on design of tubular members, Stress concentration factors, fatigue estimation, wave load on structures

Computer Aided Surface Development for Marine Vehicles

Objectives

In a structured manner, this course introduces the mathematics and programming implementation of geometric design that is needed to design smooth and fair curves, surfaces and volumes for engineering sciences – free form shapes.

Syllabus

Module 1: Introduction and classification of geometric modeling forms for curves, surfaces and volumes; differential geometry of curves and surfaces; introduction to spline curves; Bezier splines; Uniform/non-uniform Rational B-splines; and fitting, fairing and generalized cylinders.

 

Module 2: Introduction to blending surfaces; intersection problems in geometric design; offsets of parametric curves, surfaces and volumes; constructive solid geometry, boundary representation; decomposition models; and advanced topics in differential geometry.

 

Module 3: Object matching; finite element and boundary element meshing algorithms; robustness of geometric computations; introduction to interval methods; scientific visualization; variational geometry; tolerances; inspection methods; feature representation and recognition; and shape interrogation for design, analysis, and manufacturing.

 

Text books

 

[1] G. Farin (2001), Curves and Surfaces for CAGD: A Practical Guide, The Morgan Kaufmann Series in Computer Graphics, 5th edition, Morgan Kaufmann, USA.

[2] D. F. Rogers and J. A. Adams (1989), Mathematical Elements for Computer Graphics, 2nd edition, Tata McGraw-Hill, India.

 

Reference books

 

[1] K. K. Dube (2009), Differential Geometry and Tensors, I. K. International Publishing House PL, India.

[2] Q. Khan (2012), Differential Geometry of Manifolds, Prentice Hall India Learning Private Limited, India.

[3] N. M. Patrikalakis and T. Maekawa (2010), Shape Interrogation for Computer Aided Design and Manufacturing, Springer.

[4] D. Somasundaram (2008), Differential Geometry: A First Course, Narosa Book Distributors, India.

Advanced marine vehicles

Objectives

Enable the student to understand, characterize, evaluate resistance, powering and basic hydrodynamic behaviour of advance marine vehicle including warship and submarine

Syllabus

. An introduction in advanced marine vehicle (AMV) types.

  1. The basic principles of the different types of advanced marine vehicles will be explained, supported by data of recently build vessels.
  2. Hydrodynamic aspects, the contradiction between resistance and propulsion and on the other hand ships movements will be dealt with.
  3. Design strategies in the design of advanced marine vehicles.
  4. Several types of propulsion systems such as but not limited to water jets, cavitating and non cavitating propellers.
  5. Structural Aspects of AMVs
  6. An introduction to warship and Submarines
  7. Hydrostatic and hydrodynamic aspects of warship and Submarine.

 

 

Reference Books :

1.Thomas Lamp “Ship Design and Construction” Vol1 and Vol 2 published by SNAME

2.Liang Yun ” High Performance marine vessels” Springer publication

3.PJ Gates “Surface Warship-An Introduction to design principles” 1987 Brassey’s Defence Publishers.

 

Meshfree methods applied to hydrodynamics

Objectives

To introduce the students to Meshfree or particle Methods and to show them that there are alternatives to the Mesh based Methods, which are currently being used by the numerical modeling group worldwide.

Syllabus

Numerical modelling; Basics of fluid mechanics; NS – Eulerian and Lagrangian Formulations; Free surface and Body boundary conditions; Time split algorithms; Strong and Weak forms; Weighted Residual methods.

 

Overview of mesh based methods and meshfree methods; Basic techniques; Categories of meshfree methods; shape function constructions – Issues; SPH; Point Interpolations; Moving least square method; Shepard Functions; Error estimations; Support domain and Influence domain; Weight functions; Meshfree Integrations; Computational Cost; Conservation and Convergence.

 

Meshfree methods based on Global weak form – EFG; Meshfree methods based on Local weak form – MLPG; Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics; Moving Particle Semi-Implicit method; Essential Boundary conditions – Issues; Turbulence – Sub-particle scale; Meshfree methods applied to fluid dynamics problem; Matrix formulations and solution methods in meshfree methods; application to floating bodies, coastal engineering.

 

Text Books:

[1] G.R. Liu (2006), “Mesh free methods: Moving beyond the finite element method”, CRC Press, Taylor and Francis, US.

 

Reference Books:

[1] J. Anderson (1995), “Computational Fluid Dynamics: The basics with applications”, McGraw-Hill, USA.

[2] Li H and Mulay SS (2013), “Meshless methods and their numerical properties”, CRC Press, Taylor and Francis, US.

[3] S.N. Atluri (2004), “The Meshless method (MLPG) for domain and BIE discretizations”, Tech Science Press.

[4] G.R. Liu and M.B. Liu (2003), “Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics”, World Scientific, Singapore. (also available as E-book)

Drilling Technology

Objectives

In a structured manner, this course introduces the science and technology that is needed to drill wells at three levels (i.e. fundamental, application and advanced) of learning.

Syllabus

Module 1: Introduction to drilling, fundamentals of rock mechanics, basics of onshore and offshore platforms, description of equipment and procedures involved with drilling oil and gas well.

 

Module 2: Introduction to science and technology related to the drill bits, lateral drilling, drilling muds, solids control, cementing, casing, well bore stability, well control, measurement-while-drilling techniques, logging-while-drilling techniques, stuck pipe, lost circulation, and well bore hydraulics.

 

Module 3: Drilling engineering, design and development of drilling methods and drilling technologies, drill-string mechanics, mechanized and automated drilling operations, drilling problems and their solutions, coiled tubing drilling technology, casing drilling technology and casing fatigue, expandable tubular and their applications, drilling HPHT wells, drilling fluids for HPHT environment, non-conventional drilling methods, high performance drilling concepts, wellbore construction and wellbore integrity, complete life cycle assessment of the drilling process and platform, and ecology and environment impact assessment analysis.

 

Text books

[1] J. J. Azar and G. Robello Samuel (2007), Drilling Engineering, PennWell Corporation, USA.

[2] R. F. Mitchell and S. Z. Miska (2010), Fundamentals of Drilling Engineering, SPE Textbook Series, SPE USA.

 

Reference books

[1] ADITC (2015) The Drilling Manual, 5th Edition, CRC Press, USA.

[2] Jr. A. T. Bourgoyne, K. K. Millheim, M. E. Chenevert and Jr. F. S. Young (1986), Applied Drilling Engineering, Volume 2, SPE Textbook Series, SPE, USA.

HSE Management in Petroleum & Offshore Engineering

Objectives

The course will give an overview of safety and environmental issues in the petroleum industry. It will provide detailed understanding of the methods and techniques to resolve these key issues for making petroleum production and processing, cleaner and safer.

Syllabus

Various environmental issues and management that arise from drilling and oil exploration- safety assurance and assessment in design and operations- hazard classification and assessments- accident modeling, risk assessment and management- applied examples and case studies on Industrial and Process safety.

 

Text Books:

 

  1. Jan Erik Vinnem. 2007. Offshore Risk Assessment: Principles, Modeling and Applications of QRA studies. Springer, 577pp.
  2. Patin Stanislav. 1999. Environmental Impact of the Offshore Oil and Gas Industry. Eco Monitor Publishing, USA, 425pp.
  3. Ramamurthy, K. 2011. Explosions and explosion safety, Tata McGraw Hill, New Delhi, INDIA, pp. 288.
  4. Skelton, B. 1997. Process safety analysis, Gulf Publishing Company, Houston, 210pp.
  5. Srinivasan Chandrasekaran 2015. HSE in offshore and petroleum engineering, Lecture notes of online web course, Mass Open-source Online Courses (MOOC), National Program on Technology Enhancement and Learning (NPTEL), Govt. of India.
  6. Srinivasan Chandrasekaran. 2016a. Offshore structural engineering: Reliability and Risk Assessment. CRC Press, Florida, ISBN:978-14-987-6519-0
  7. Srinivasan Chandrasekaran. 2016b. Health, Safety and Environmental Management in Offshore and Petroleum Engineering, John Wiley & Sons, ISBN: 978-11-192-2184-5.
  8. Terje Aven and Jan Erik Vinnem. 2007. Risk Management with applications from Offshore Petroleum Industry. Springer, 200pp.
  9. William J. Cairns (Ed), 1992. North Sea Oil and the Environment: Development Oil and Gas Resources, Environmental Impacts and Responses, International Council of Oil and the Environment.

 

Reference Books:

 

  1. Ale B. J. M. 2002. Risk assessment practices in The Netherlands Safety Science, 40, 105-126.
  2. Crawley, F., M. Preston, and B. Tyler: “HAZOP: Guide to best practice. Guidelines to best practice for the process and chemical industries”. European Process Safety Centre and Institution of Chemical Engineers, 2000
  3. IEC 61882. “Hazard and operability studies (HAZOP studies) – Application guide”. International Electro technical Commission, Geneva.
  4. IS1656:2006, Indian Standard Hazard Identification and Risk Analysis-Code of Practice, Bureau of Indian Standards, 2006
  5. Kyriakdis, I.: “HAZOP – Comprehensive Guide to HAZOP in CSIRO”, CSIRO Minerals, National Safety Council of Australia, 2003
  6. Lees, F.P. 1996. Loss Prevention in Process Industries: Hazard identification, Assessment and Control, Vol. 1-3, Butterwort-Heinemann, Oxford, 1245pp.
  7. OGP Risk Assessment Data Directory: Report No.434-1, Process Release Frequencies, March 2010.
  8. OISD – GDN – 169, OISD Guidelines on Small LPG bottling plants (Design and Fire Protection Facilities), Oil Industry Safety Directorate, Amended edition, 2011.
  9. OISD Standard – 116, Fire Protection Facilities for Petroleum Refineries and Oil/Gas Processing Plants, Oil Industry Safety Directorate, Amended edition, 2002
  10. OISD Standard – 144, Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG) Installations, Oil Industry Safety Directorate, Second edition,
  11. OISD Standard – 150, Design and Safety Requirements for Liquefied Petroleum Gas Mounded Storage Facility, Oil Industry Safety Directorate, 2013.
  12. TNO (1999) Guidelines for quantitative risk analysis, The Director General of Labour, The Hague, Netherlands.
  13. Trevor Kletz. 2003. Still going wrong: Case histories and plant disasters, Elsevier, pp. 230.
  14. Valerie J. Sutherland, Cary L. Cooper. 1991. Stress and accidents in offshore, oil and gas industries, Gulf Publishing Co., Houston, pp. 227.
  15. Webber, D.M., S.J. Jones, G.A. Tickle, and T. Wren, (1992): A Model of a Dispersing Gas Cloud, and the Computer Implementation. I:Near Instantaneous Release, II: Steady Continuous Releases. UKAEA Reports SRD/HSE R586 (for part I) and R. 587 (for part II).
  16. Wiltox, H. W. M., (2001) Unified Dispersion Model (UDM), Theory Manual, DNV.

 

Ocean Structures and Materials

Objectives

The course will give an overview of different types of ocean structures that are deployed in sea for exploiting oil, gas and minerals. It will provide a detailed understanding of various types of structural systems/forms that are constructed at different water depths for oil and gas exploration, coastal protection etc. Brief overview of various environmental loads acting of these structures will be discussed along with the structural action to counteract the encountered loads. The course will cover different types of materials that are used in the construction of ocean structures in marine environment along with their construction methodologies in brief. Guidelines associated with selection of materials for marine environment, problems associated with the material behavior in marine environment and various protection methods will also be highlighted. The course also shall introduce inspection and testing methods of ocean structures, repair and rehabilitation processes. The course is supported by lot of tutorials and FAQs to make the reader to understand the described concepts.

Syllabus

Introduction to different types of ocean structures- near shore structures, different structural systems of ocean structures namely: fixed, floating, compliant type, semi-submersibles etc.

 

Types of environmental loads- structural action of ocean structures- planning guidelines and design principles- regulations and codes of practice- foundation of ocean structures- sea bed anchors- dredging methods and equipments.

 

Different materials for marine applications: metals, concrete and other materials for marine environment- their characteristics, properties and selection guidelines. Problems associated with deterioration of materials in marine environment, their remedies and protection methods.

 

Inspection and testing of marine structures- methods and equipments- non-destructive techniques. Repair and rehabilitation of marine structures. structural health monitoring of marine structures.

 

Text Books:

 

  1. Chakrabarti, S. K. 1987. Hydrodynamics of Offshore Structures: Computational Mechanics.
  2. Clauss, G. T. et al. 1992. Offshore Structures, Vol 1 – Conceptual Design and Hydromechanics: Springer, London.
  3. Dawson, T. H., 1983. Offshore Structural Engineering: Prentice-Hall Inc.
  4. Gerwick, B.C.Jr. 1986. Construction of Offshore Structures: John Wiley, New York.
  5. Graff, W.J. 1981. Introduction to offshore structures: Design, fabrication and installation: Gulf Publishing Co, Tokyo.
  6. Graff, W.J. 1981. Introduction to Offshore Structures: Gulf Publishing Co., Houston.
  7. Mather, A. 2000. Offshore Engineering: an Introduction, 2nd edn: Witherby
  8. Srinivasan Chandrasekaran. 2015a. Dynamic analysis and design of ocean structures. Springer, INDIA, ISBN: 978-81-322-2276-7.
  9. Srinivasan Chandrasekaran. 2015b. Advanced Marine structures, CRC Press, Florida (USA), ISBN 9781498739689.
  10. Srinivasan Chandrasekaran. 2016. Offshore structural engineering: Reliability and Risk Assessment. CRC Press, Florida, ISBN:978-14-987-6519-0.
  11. Srinivasan Chandrasekaran and A.K.Jain. 2016. Ocean structures: Construction, Materials and Operations, CRC Press, Florida, ISBN: 978-14-987-9742-9.

 

Reference Books:

 

  1. API-RP2A. 1989. Recommended Practice for Planning, Designing and Constructing Fixed Offshore Platforms: 18th edn. American Petroleum Institute, Washington, D.C.
  2. 1982. Code of Practice for Fixed Offshore Structures: British Standards Institution, London.
  3. CAP 437. 2010. Offshore Helicopters landing areas: Guidance on Standards: 6th edn. Civil Aviation Authority, U.K.
  4. Chakrabarti, S. K. 1990. Non-linear method in offshore engineering, Elsevier Science Publisher, The Netherlands.
  5. Chakrabarti, S. K. 1994.Offshore Structure Modeling: World Scientific.
  6. DNV 1982. Rules for the Design, Construction and Inspection of Offshore Structures: Det Norske Veritas, Oslo.
  7. DOE-OG. 1985. Offshore Installation: Guidance on Design and Construction: U.K., Dept. of Energy, London.
  8. I. H and Incecik. A 2004. Dynamics of double articulated towers, Integrity of offshore structures- 4: Elsevier.
  9. Hsu, H.T. 1981. Applied Offshore Structural Engineering: Gulf Publishing Co., Houston.
  10. Jeom Kee Paik and Anil Kumar Thayamballi. 2007. Ship-shaped offshore installations: Design, building and operations: Cambridge University Press.
  11. NPD 1985. Regulation for Structural Design of Load-bearing Structures Intended for Exploitation of Petroleum Resources: Norwegian Petroleum Directorate.
  12. Patel, M. H., 1989. Dynamics of offshore structures: Butterworths, London.
  13. Sadehi, K. 1989. Design and analysis of Marine structures: Khajeh Nasirroddin Tsi University of Technology, Tehran, Iran.
  14. Sadehi, K. 2001. Coasts, Ports and Offshore Structures Engineering: Power and Water University of Technology, Tehran, Iran.
  15. Sarpkaya, T. and Isaacson, M. 1981. Mechanics of Wave Forces on Offshore Structures: Van Nostrand Reinhold.
  16. Srinivasan Chandrasekaran and Subrata Kumar Bhattacharyya. 2012. Analysis and Design of Offshore Structures with illustrated examples. Human Resource Development Center for Offshore and Plant Engineering (HOPE Center), Changwon National University Press, Republic of Korea ISBN: 978-89-963915-5-5.
  17. Srinivasan Chandrasekaran. 2014. Advanced Theory on Offshore Plant FEED Engineering, Changwon National University, Republic of South Korea, pp. 237. ISBN:978-89-969792-8-9
Installation of Offshore Structures

Syllabus

Concepts of offshore installations : Fixed and floating structures; Spars and TLP’s; Modular topsides and integrated topsides; deck levels and jacket configurations; Spar and TLP hull arrangements;

Loadout : Fabrication yard, grillage and foundation conditions; Fabrication sequence of Launch jacket, lift jackets, topsides and modules; Weighing and weight control; Skidded, Trailer and lifted Loadout methods;

Transportation : Cargo barges; Launch barges; layout of cargo arrangement; Sea fastening layout and design; Static and dynamic stability of barge; Motion analysis of barge – cargo system; Transportation analysis. Transportation fatigue analysis;

Installation Schemes : Lifting and launch schemes for jackets, upending and setting, on bottom stability; Float-over installations; Dynamics of barge – cargo system;

Installation aids : Launch cradle design; Buoyancy tank design; Lift points – padeyes and trunnions; spreader frame and spreader bar concepts; Mudmat concepts and design methods; Lifting topside modules and towers; Bumpers and guides; Grouting and leveling of jackets;

Pile Driving and Monitoring : Pile driveabililty; Pile stickup design; main and skirt piles concepts; Vertical and batter piles; Dynamics of vertical piles; Pile driving stresses; Pile driving monitoring system; Pile capacity prediction from driving records.

Modeling of Ships and offshore Structures

Syllabus

Ships : Computer modeling of hull forms. Static and dynamic stability calculations. Motion response analysis of ships in irregular seaway and calculation of various dynamic effects, e.g. slamming, shipping of green water, added resistance etc. Forward speed effects on ship motion. Maneuvering simulation. Introduction to CFD applications to problems of ship hydrodynamics. Examples problems and case studies, tutorial problems.

Offshore Structures: Introduction to structural modeling and analysis of jacket structures; Main piled and skirt pile jacket models, In-service analysis for storm wave loads, load-out and launch analysis, sea transportation loads generation and analysis; Seismic and fatigue analysis;

Basics of motion analysis of floating structures; Motion analysis of flat bottom barges, heavy lift vessels and other floating systems such as SPAR, Tension leg platforms and semi-submersible; Generation of Response Amplitude Operators (RAOs); Case studies and tutorial problems;

 

Materials and Fabrication of Ships and Offshore Structures

Syllabus

Steel : Steel manufacturing processes; Tempered and quenched steel; Thermo-Mechanically Controlled Process(TMCP); Low carbon steel, high strength alloys, duplex and super duplex steels; ASTM / ABS / API steel products, chemical composition, carbon equivalent, mechanical properties, through thickness requirements, weldability, supplementary requirements, low temperature service, Charpy V-notch test and energy requirements, properties of steel at elevated and low temperature;

Welding: American Welding Society (AWS) guidelines, standard prequalified welds, Welding processes; SMAW and FCAW process; full penetration / fillet welds, heat affected zone (HAZ), Welding electrodes; Hydrogen induced cracking; Crack Tip Opening Displacement (CTOD) tests, fabrication tolerances, residual stresses; inspection and quality control requirements; NDT of welds; Ultrasonic tests; Magnetic particle inspection; X-rays methods; Aluminum and Bi-metallic welding;

Fabrication and Assembly: Rolling and fabrication of tubular and TKY joints, typical jacket fabrication and rollup procedure; Ship building process; Fabrication and assembly of ship hulls; Modular fit-ups; Ship lifts and launch ways.

Corrosion and Control : Corrosion Mechanism; Types of corrosion; Seawater corrosion; corrosion allowance, cathodic protection design, impressed current method, sacrificial anodes design, protective coatings, splash zone protection, cathodic protection monitoring system.

Concrete / composites : Underwater concrete, mix design, quick setting compounds, high strength grout, fiber reinforced plastics, special composite materials for under water repairs.

Underwater repair: Underwater welding, repair schemes for tubular members, grouted sleeve connections, and stressed – grouted connections for tubular joints.

 

Advanced marine vehicles

Objectives

Enable the student to understand, characterize, evaluate resistance, powering and basic hydrodynamic behaviour of advance marine vehicle including warship and submarine

Syllabus

An introduction in advanced marine vehicle (AMV) types.

  1. The basic principles of the different types of advanced marine vehicles will be explained, supported by data of recently build vessels.
  2. Hydrodynamic aspects, the contradiction between resistance and propulsion and on the other hand ships movements will be dealt with.
  3. Design strategies in the design of advanced marine vehicles.
  4. Several types of propulsion systems such as but not limited to water jets, cavitating and non cavitating propellers.
  5. Structural Aspects of AMVs
  6. An introduction to warship and Submarines
  7. Hydrostatic and hydrodynamic aspects of warship and Submarine.

 

 

Reference Books :

1.Thomas Lamp “Ship Design and Construction” Vol1 and Vol 2 published by SNAME

2.Liang Yun ” High Performance marine vessels” Springer publication

3.PJ Gates “Surface Warship-An Introduction to design principles” 1987 Brassey’s Defence Publishers.

 

 

COURSE NO COURSE NAME L T ET ALS TIME(OUT OF CLASS) CREDIT
AM6570 Flow Induced Vibration 3 0 0 0 6 9
ME7910 Acoustics & Noise Control 3 0 0 0 6 9
ME7360 Theory of Vibration 3 0 0 0 6 9
CH6020 Computational Fluid Dynamics 3 0 0 0 6 9
CE5230 Applied Fluid Mechanics 3 0 0 0 6 9
CE5720 Stability of Structures 3 0 0 0 6 9
MM5180 Non-Destructive Evaluation 3 0 0 0 6 9
MM5320 Corrosion Engineering 3 0 0 0 6 9
ID5020 Multibody dynamics and applications 3 0 0 0 6 9
AS 5820 Analysis of Plates and Shells 3 0 0 0 6 9
AS 5850 Finite Element Analysis 3 0 0 0 6 9
AS 5860 Composite Structures 3 0 0 0 6 9
AS5870 Energy Methods in Structural Analysis 3 0 0 0 6 9
AS5920 Dynamics of Elastic Systems 3 0 0 0 6 9
AS5960 Advanced Strength of Materials 3 0 0 0 6 9
AS5970 Structural Dynamics and Aeroelasticity 3 0 0 0 6 9
AM5116 Structural Control 3 0 0 0 6 9
AM5650 Nonlinear Vibrations 3 0 0 0 6 9
AM5570 Introduction to Turbulence 3 0 0 0 6 9
AM5340 Stochastic Processes in Structural Mechanics 3 0 0 0 6 9
AM5290 Dynamics of Structures 3 0 0 0 6 9
AM5600 Computational Techniques in Applied Mechanics 3 0 0 0 6 9
AM5610 Measurements in Mechanics 3 0 0 0 6 9
AM5390 Advanced Structural Mechanics 3 0 0 0 6 9
AM5530 Advanced Fluid Mechanics 3 0 0 0 6 9
AM5117 Analytical Methods in Mechanics 3 0 0 0 6 9
AM 5620 Theory of Plates and Shells 3 0 0 0 6 9
AM5630 Foundation of Computational Fluid Dynamic 3 0 0 0 6 9
ME 6800 Finite Element Analysis 3 0 0 0 6 9
ME 7360 Theory of Vibration 3 0 0 0 6 9
ME6000 Computational Methods in Engineering 3 0 0 0 6 9
CE5620 Structural Dynamics 3 1 0 0 6 10
CE6780 Advanced Mechanics of Structures 3 1 0 0 6 10
CE5610 Finite Element Analysis 3 1 0 0 8 12
M.Tech Petroleum Engineering
Semester ISemester IISemester IIISemester IVElectives
COURSE NO COURSE NAME L T ET ALS TIME(OUT OF CLASS) CREDIT
PE6030 Reservoir Engineering 3 0 0 0 6 9
PE6050 Exploration and Formation Evaluation of Oil and Gas Reservoirs 3 0 0 0 6 9
PE6180 Natural Gas Engineering 3 1 0 0 6 10
DPE1 Department Elective 1 3 0 0 0 6 9
DPE2 Department Elective 2 3 0 0 0 6 9
Total Credits : 46
Reservoir Engineering

Objectives

To impart a fundamental understanding on multi-phase fluid flow through a petroleum reservoir.

OUTCOMES

To understand the main concepts and techniques that applies to reservoir engineering; and to apply a critical-thinking and problem-solving approach towards the main principles of reservoir engineering.

Syllabus

Introduction to reservoir engineering; petroleum reservoir system; petroleum reserves; reservoir pressure and temperature; reservoir fluids composition; phase behavior of hydrocarbons; properties of reservoir liquids; fundamental properties of reservoir rocks; reservoir drive mechanisms; single and multi-phase fluid flow through porous media; material balance equation; basic water-drive and immiscible displacement theories. Laboratory demonstration of porosity and permeability measurements using Helium Porosimeter and Liquid Permeameter.
Text Books:
1. Lyons, W. C. (1996). Standard Handbook of Petroleum and Natural Gas Engineering. Gulf professional Publishing (6th Edition), 1076 pages.
2. Craft, B. C., M. Hawkins., and R. E. Terry. (1991). Applied Petroleum Reservoir Engineering (2nd
Edition), Prentice Hall, 464 pages.
3. Lake, L. W. (1989). Enhanced Oil Recovery, Prentice Hall, Englewood Cliffs.
4. Amyx, J. W., D. M. Bass., and R. L. Whiting. (1960). Petroleum Reservoir Engineering – Physical Properties. McGraw-Hill Inc.
5. Marle, C. M. (1981). Multiphase Flow in Porous Media. Gulf Publishing Company.
Reference Books:
1. Dake, L. P. (2001). Fundamentals of Reservoir Engineering (Developments in Petroleum Science), Elsevier, ISSN: 0376-7361 (series).
2. Towler, B. F. (2002). Fundamental Principles of Reservoir
Engineering. Textbook Vol. 8, Society of Petroleum Engineers, 232 pages. ISBN: 978-1-55563-092-8.
3. Ewing, R.E. (1987). The Mathematics of Reservoir Simulation. Society for Industrial
Mathematics, 198 pages.
4. Ahmed, T. (2006). Reservoir Engineering Handbook. Gulf Professional Publishers,
(3rd edition), 1376 pages.
5. Goodman, R. E. (1989) Introduction to Rock Mechanics, Second edition, John Wiley
& Sons.
6. Jaegar, J., N. G. Cook., and R. Zimmerman (2007) Fundamentals of Rock Mechanics, Fourth Edition,Blackwell Publishing.

Drilling Technology

Objectives

In a structured manner, this course introduces the science and technology that is needed to drill wells at three levels (i.e. fundamental, application and advanced) of learning

Syllabus

Module 1: Introduction to drilling, fundamentals of rock mechanics, basics of onshore and offshore platforms, description of equipment and procedures involved with drilling oil and gas well.

 

Module 2: Introduction to science and technology related to the drill bits, lateral drilling, drilling muds, solids control, cementing, casing, well bore stability, well control, measurement-while-drilling techniques, logging-while-drilling techniques, stuck pipe, lost circulation, and well bore hydraulics.

 

Module 3: Drilling engineering, design and development of drilling methods and drilling technologies, drill-string mechanics, mechanized and automated drilling operations, drilling problems and their solutions, coiled tubing drilling technology, casing drilling technology and casing fatigue, expandable tubular and their applications, drilling HPHT wells, drilling fluids for HPHT environment, non-conventional drilling methods, high performance drilling concepts, wellbore construction and wellbore integrity, complete life cycle assessment of the drilling process and platform, and ecology and environment impact assessment analysis.

 

Text books

[1] J. J. Azar and G. Robello Samuel (2007), Drilling Engineering, PennWell Corporation, USA.

[2] R. F. Mitchell and S. Z. Miska (2010), Fundamentals of Drilling Engineering, SPE Textbook Series, SPE USA.

 

Reference books

[1] ADITC (2015) The Drilling Manual, 5th Edition, CRC Press, USA.

[2] Jr. A. T. Bourgoyne, K. K. Millheim, M. E. Chenevert and Jr. F. S. Young (1986), Applied Drilling Engineering, Volume 2, SPE Textbook Series, SPE, USA.

HSE Management in Petroleum & Offshore Engineering

Objectives

The course will give an overview of safety and environmental issues in the petroleum industry. It will provide detailed understanding of the methods and techniques to resolve these key issues for making petroleum production and processing, cleaner and safer.

Syllabus

Various environmental issues and management that arise from drilling and oil exploration- safety assurance and assessment in design and operations- hazard classification and assessments- accident modeling, risk assessment and management- applied examples and case studies on Industrial and Process safety.

Text Books:

  1. Jan Erik Vinnem. 2007. Offshore Risk Assessment: Principles, Modeling and Applications of QRA studies. Springer, 577pp.
  2. Patin Stanislav. 1999. Environmental Impact of the Offshore Oil and Gas Industry. Eco Monitor Publishing, USA, 425pp.
  3. Ramamurthy, K. 2011. Explosions and explosion safety, Tata McGraw Hill, New Delhi, INDIA, pp. 288.
  4. Skelton, B. 1997. Process safety analysis, Gulf Publishing Company, Houston, 210pp.
  5. Srinivasan Chandrasekaran 2015. HSE in offshore and petroleum engineering, Lecture notes of online web course, Mass Open-source Online Courses (MOOC), National Program on Technology Enhancement and Learning (NPTEL), Govt. of India.
  6. Srinivasan Chandrasekaran. 2016a. Offshore structural engineering: Reliability and Risk Assessment. CRC Press, Florida, ISBN:978-14-987-6519-0
  7. Srinivasan Chandrasekaran. 2016b. Health, Safety and Environmental Management in Offshore and Petroleum Engineering, John Wiley & Sons, ISBN: 978-11-192-2184-5.
  8. Terje Aven and Jan Erik Vinnem. 2007. Risk Management with applications from Offshore Petroleum Industry. Springer, 200pp.
  9. William J. Cairns (Ed), 1992. North Sea Oil and the Environment: Development Oil and Gas Resources, Environmental Impacts and Responses, International Council of Oil and the Environment.

Reference Books:

  1. Ale B. J. M. 2002. Risk assessment practices in The Netherlands Safety Science, 40, 105-126.
  2. Crawley, F., M. Preston, and B. Tyler: “HAZOP: Guide to best practice. Guidelines to best practice for the process and chemical industries”. European Process Safety Centre and Institution of Chemical Engineers, 2000
  3. IEC 61882. “Hazard and operability studies (HAZOP studies) – Application guide”. International Electro technical Commission, Geneva.
  4. IS1656:2006, Indian Standard Hazard Identification and Risk Analysis-Code of Practice, Bureau of Indian Standards, 2006
  5. Kyriakdis, I.: “HAZOP – Comprehensive Guide to HAZOP in CSIRO”, CSIRO Minerals, National Safety Council of Australia, 2003
  6. Lees, F.P. 1996. Loss Prevention in Process Industries: Hazard identification, Assessment and Control, Vol. 1-3, Butterwort-Heinemann, Oxford, 1245pp.
  7. OGP Risk Assessment Data Directory: Report No.434-1, Process Release Frequencies, March 2010.
  8. OISD – GDN – 169, OISD Guidelines on Small LPG bottling plants (Design and Fire Protection Facilities), Oil Industry Safety Directorate, Amended edition, 2011.
  9. OISD Standard – 116, Fire Protection Facilities for Petroleum Refineries and Oil/Gas Processing Plants, Oil Industry Safety Directorate, Amended edition, 2002
  10. OISD Standard – 144, Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG) Installations, Oil Industry Safety Directorate, Second edition,
  11. OISD Standard – 150, Design and Safety Requirements for Liquefied Petroleum Gas Mounded Storage Facility, Oil Industry Safety Directorate, 2013.
  12. TNO (1999) Guidelines for quantitative risk analysis, The Director General of Labour, The Hague, Netherlands.
  13. Trevor Kletz. 2003. Still going wrong: Case histories and plant disasters, Elsevier, pp. 230.
  14. Valerie J. Sutherland, Cary L. Cooper. 1991. Stress and accidents in offshore, oil and gas industries, Gulf Publishing Co., Houston, pp. 227.
  15. Webber, D.M., S.J. Jones, G.A. Tickle, and T. Wren, (1992): A Model of a Dispersing Gas Cloud, and the Computer Implementation. I:Near Instantaneous Release, II: Steady Continuous Releases. UKAEA Reports SRD/HSE R586 (for part I) and R. 587 (for part II).
  16. Wiltox, H. W. M., (2001) Unified Dispersion Model (UDM), Theory Manual, DNV.
COURSE NO COURSE NAME L T ET ALS TIME(OUT OF CLASS) CREDIT
PE6031 Reservoir Simulation 3 0 0 0 6 9
PE6040 Seismic data acquisition, Processing and Interpretation 3 0 0 0 6 9
PE6312 Enhanced Oil Recovery 3 0 0 0 6 9
DPE3 Department Elective 3 3 0 0 0 6 9
DPE4 Department Elective 4 3 0 0 0 6 9
DPE5 Department Elective 5 3 0 0 0 6 9
Total Credits : 54
Reservoir Simulation

LEARNING OBJECTIVES

This course aims to (1) introduce the student a fundamental knowledge on modelling multi-phase fluid flow through petroleum reservoirs by numerical techniques, which is a widely used tool in petroleum industry and research and (2) guide the student to learn how to solve oil recovery techniques through the professional use of numerical modelling techniques.

OUTCOMES

The learning outcomes are for the student to (1) gain knowledge and skills needed to solve reservoir engineering problems by means of numerical techniques; (2) apply integrated knowledge of mathematical and basic sciences to the solution of problems related to multi-phase fluid flow through petroleum reservoirs and reservoir performance predictions.

SYLLABUS

Derivation of partial differential equations governing single and multi-phase fluid flow through petroleum reservoirs; Conceptual, mathematical and numerical modelling principles; Introduction to elliptic, parabolic and hyperbolic partial differential equations; Introduction to finite difference techniques; Introducing numerical modelling concepts on thermal/microbial enhanced oil recovery techniques; fluid flow through fractured/shale-gas/coal-bed-methane reservoirs using dual-porosity approach.
Text Books:
1. Zhangxin Chen. (2008) Reservoir Simulation: Mathematical Techniques in Oil Recovery, Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics.
2. Abou-Kassem, J. H., Farouq Ali, S. M., and Islam, M. R. (2006) Petroleum Reservoir Simulation: A Basic Approach, Gulf Publishing Company.
3. Fanchi John R. (2005) Principles
of Applied Reservoir Simulation, Gulf Professional Publishing.
4. Carlson, M. R., (2003) Practical Reservoir Simulation: Using, Assessing, and Developing Results, Pennwell Books.
Reference Books:
1. Mattax, C.C. and Kyte, R.L. (1990) Reservoir Simulation, Monograph Series, SPE, Richardson, TX.
2. Ertekin, Abou-Kassem and King. (2001) Basic Applied Reservoir Simulation, SPE Textbook 7.
3. Mattax, C. C. and Dalton, R. L. (1990) Reservoir Simulation, SPE Monograph.
4. Armin Iske, and Trygve Randen (Editors). (2004) Mathematical Methods and Modelling In Hydrocarbon Exploration and Production, Part III. Springer.

Natural Gas Engineering
Objectives
The objective of this course to understand flow of natural gas in reservoirs and in wellbores and gathering systems; deliverability testing; flow measurement and compressor sizing
Syllabus
Properties and Measurement of Natural Gas: Phase behavior fundamentals, qualitative and quantitative phase behavior, vapor liquid equilibrium.

Equation of state, critical pressure and temperature determination. Gas compressibility, viscosity and thermal conductivity, formation volume factor.

Gas flow measurement, and fundamentals, Gas Reservoir Performance, Steady State Flow of Gas in Production Tubing, Temperatures profiling in flowing gas systems.

Natural gas processing, Gas Compression, Gas Gathering and Transport Installation, Operation and trouble shooting of natural gas pipelines

Unconventional gas: Coal Bed Methane, Natural Gas Hydrate, Basin Centered Gas, Tight Gas Sands, Shale Gas. Current Technology for Shale Gas and Tight Gas Exploration and Production. LNG: Production and Utilization, Issue and Challenges to Enhance Supply of Natural Gas

Text Books:

1. Beggs, D, H, Gas Production Operations. Edition Technip. 1984.
2. Chaudhary, Amanat U, Gas well Testing Handbook, Elsevier, 2003.
3. Ikoku, Chi, “Natural Gas Production Engineering”, John Wiley and Sons, 1984.

Reference Books:

1. Lee, J, Wattenbarger, R. A., “Gas Reservoir Engineering”, Society of Petroleum Engineers, TX, USA, 1996.
2. Mokhatab, S, Poe, W A and Speight, J G, Handbook of Natural Gas Transmission and Processing, Gulf Professional Publishing, 2006.
3. Kumar Sanjay, “Gas Production Engineering”, Gulf Professional Publishing, TX, USA, 1987.

Reservoir Simulation

Objectives

This course aims to (1) introduce the student a fundamental knowledge on modelling multi-phase fluid flow through petroleum reservoirs by numerical techniques, which is a widely used tool in petroleum industry and research and (2) guide the student to learn how to solve oil recovery techniques through the professional use of numerical modelling techniques.

Syllabus

Derivation of partial differential equations governing single and multi-phase fluid flow through petroleum reservoirs; Conceptual, mathematical and numerical modelling principles; Introduction to elliptic, parabolic and hyperbolic partial differential equations; Introduction to finite difference techniques; Introducing numerical modelling concepts on thermal/microbial enhanced oil recovery techniques; fluid flow through fractured/shale-gas/coal-bed-methane reservoirs using dual-porosity approach.

Text Books:

  1. Zhangxin Chen. (2008) Reservoir Simulation: Mathematical Techniques in Oil Recovery, Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics.
  2. Abou-Kassem, J. H., Farouq Ali, S. M., and Islam, M. R. (2006) Petroleum Reservoir Simulation: A Basic Approach, Gulf Publishing Company.
  3. Fanchi John R. (2005) Principles of Applied Reservoir Simulation, Gulf Professional Publishing.
  4. Carlson, M. R., (2003) Practical Reservoir Simulation: Using, Assessing, and Developing Results, Pennwell Books.

Reference Books:

Mattax, C.C. and Kyte, R.L. (1990) Reservoir Simulation, Monograph Series, SPE, Richardson, TX.

  1. Ertekin, Abou-Kassem and King. (2001) Basic Applied Reservoir Simulation, SPE Textbook 7.
  2. Mattax, C. C. and Dalton, R. L. (1990) Reservoir Simulation, SPE Monograph.
  3. Armin Iske, and Trygve Randen (Editors). (2004) Mathematical Methods and Modelling In Hydrocarbon Exploration and Production, Part III. Springer.
COURSE NO COURSE NAME L T ET ALS TIME(OUT OF CLASS) CREDIT
PE6200* Project 0 0 0 0 40 40
Total Credits : 40
COURSE NO COURSE NAME L T ET ALS TIME(OUT OF CLASS) CREDIT
PE6200* Project 0 0 0 0 50 60
Total Credits : 60
TOTAL CREDITS 200
COURSE NO COURSE NAME L T ET ALS TIME(OUT OF CLASS) CREDIT
PE6090 HSE Management in Petroleum & Offshore Engg 3 0 0 0 6 9
PE6060 Offshore Oil and Gas Production Systems 3 0 0 0 6 9
PE6317 Applied Hydrodynamics in Petroleum Exploration and Production 3 0 0 0 6 9
PE6313 Applied Scientific Computing in Ocean and Petroleum Engineering 3 0 0 0 6 9
PE6010 Petroleum Geology 3 0 0 0 6 9
PE5050 Offshore Drilling and Well Completion 3 0 0 0 6 9
OE5050 Numerical Techniques in Ocean Hydrodynamics 3 0 0 0 6 9
PE6320 Sub Sea Engineering for Oil and Gas Fields 3 0 0 0 6 9
PE6314 Drilling Fluid Design and Analysis 3 0 0 0 6 9
PE5020 Environmental Impacts of Petroleum Exploration and Production 3 0 0 0 6 9
PE6311 Well Logging and formation evaluation 3 1 1 0 6 11
OE6020 Meshfree methods applied to hydrodynamics 3 1 0 2 6 12
OE5650 Marine Corrosion Engineering 3 0 0 0 6 9
AM5530 Advanced Fluid Mechanics 3 0 0 1 6 10
ME6000 Computational Methods in Engineering 3 0 0 0 6 9
OE5012 Deep Sea Technology 3 0 0 0 6 9
Total Credits : 42
Oil and Gas Production Systems

Objectives

  • The course aims to introduce the post-graduate students the basics of oil and gas production systems which will mainly include artificial pumping systems for petroleum production and designing of surface production operations related to storage and processing of reservoir fluids.
  • The course aims to bridge knowledge gap of the students between Drilling and Well Completions and the Petroleum Production Operations.

 

Syllabus

Petroleum production system, Properties of oil and natural gas, Multi-phase flows in pipes, Inflow performance, Well deliverability, Forecast of well production, natural flow.
Design and analysis of artificial lift systems, selection procedure, pump classification, Sucker rod pump, pumping units, issues in sucker rod pumps, gas interference, Introduction to Electrical submersible pump, pump and motor assembly, gas separator, failure modes, Progressive cavity pump, metallic and non-metallic stator, Hydraulic pump, jet pump, Gas lift, Continuous and intermittent flow gas lift, gas lift valves, Plunger lift.
Reservoir fluid and produced water composition, fluid production system, sand production, three phase fluid separation, classification of separator, components of separator, design of separator, liquid level control, dehydration, demulsification and desalting of oil, produced water treatment, flow control and metering system, oil and gas storage, safety and control systems.

Text books:

  • Petroleum Production Engineering, B. Guo, WC Lyon and A gambhor, Elsevier, 2007.
  • Gas Well Deliquification, JF Lea, HV Nickens, MR Wells , Elsevier, 2008.
  • Standard handbook of Petroleum and Natural Gas Engineering, W.C. Lyons, Gulf publishing Company.
  • Surface production Operations, Volume 1&2, K Arnold and M Stewart, gulf Publishing Company.
  • Electric Submersible Pump, G. Takacs, Elsevier, 2008.
  • Hand Book for Electric Submersible Pump, Centrilift, 1997.
  • Progressive Cavity Pumps, Downhole Pumps, and Mud Motors, Lev Nelik, Gulf publishing company, TX, 2005.
  • Petroleum and Natural Gas Production Engineering, W.C. Lyons, Elsevier. 2010.
  • Gas Lift Manual, API, 1994.
  • The Technology of Artificial Lift Methods, K.E. Brown, Pennwell Books, Oklahama, 1980.
  • Petroleum Production Systems, Economides et al., Prenticehall, New jersey, 1994.
  • Production Optimization, H.D. Beggs, OGCI and Petroskills Publications, Tulsa-Oklahama, 2003.
  • Petroleum Engineering hand book, Vol VI. SPE, 2007.
Reference books:
Applied Hydrodynamics in Petroleum Exploration and Production

LEARNING OBJECTIVES

 To impart the knowledge of hydrodynamics as applicable in a complex sub-surface petroleum reservoir system under elevated temperature and pressure;
 To enhance the knowledge of pressure controls on petroleum exploration as well as production.

OUTCOMES

To understand the main concepts and techniques that applies to hydrodynamics of a petroleum reservoir; and to apply a critical-thinking towards the main principles of reservoir hydrodynamics.

SYLLABUS

Internal forces in hydrostatic and hydrodynamic sub-surface environments; hydraulic segregation of hydrocarbons; force models of hydrocarbon traps; hydrodynamic rock-water systems; interpretation of pressure-depth gradient plots and potentiometric surfaces; pressure deflection maps; tilted and displaced oil and gas pools.
Origins of abnormal pressure: development of abnormal pressure, low pressure environments, prediction and detection of over pressure, aqua-thermal pressuring, osmosis, imposed pressure and paleo-pressures; pressure engineering:
pressure gradients of oil, water and gas, formation balance gradient, effective over-burden pressure in normal and geo-pressured formations, bottom-hole circulating pressure, swab and surge pressures; Fracture pressure: past and current technology, estimation of fracture pressure, sub-surface stress states, zero tensile strength concept;
pressure related problems: causes, effects and solutions of lost circulation, massive hydraulic fracturing and stimulation, kicks, pressures in carbonates.
TEXT BOOKS:
Bear, J. (1972). Dynamics of fluids in porous media. Courier Dover Publications: New York, 764 pages.
Civan, F. (2011). Porous media transport phenomena. John Wiley & Sons: New Jersey, 463 pages.
Leonov, E. G., and V. I. Isaev. (2010). Applied hydro-aeromechanics in oil and gas drilling. John Wiley & Sons: New Jersey, 443 pages.
Dahlberg, E. C. (1994). Applied Hydrodynamics in petroleum exploration. 2nd Edition, Springer-Verlag: New York, 295 pages.
Phillips, O. M. (2009). Geological fluid dynamics: Sub-surface flow and reactions. Cambridge University Press: Cambridge, 285 pages.
REFERENCES
Chilingar, G. V., V. A. Serebryakov., and J. O. Robertson. (2002). Origin and prediction of abnormal formation pressures. Elsevier: Amsterdam, 373 pages.
Fertl, W. H., G. V. Chilingar., and H. H. Rieke. (1976). Abnormal formation pressures: Implications to exploration, drilling and production of oil and gas resources. Elsevier: Amsterdam, 382 pages.
Franciss, F. O. (2010). Fractured rock hydraulics. Taylor & Francis group: London, 170 pages.
Magara, K. (1978). Compaction and fluid migration: Practical petroleum geology. Elsevier: Amsterdam, 330 pages.
Tissot, B. P. and Welte, D. H. (1984). Petroleum formation and occurrence. 2nd Edition, Springer-Verlag: Berlin, 699 pages.

Well-completion, Production,Testing & Analysis

Objectives
• The course aims to introduce the post-graduate students the basics of oil and gas completion and well testing systems. The topic includes the post drilling operations before handling over to the production engineers
• The course aims to bridge knowledge gap of the students between Drilling and the Petroleum Production Operations.

Syllabus
Well completion: types of wells, completion functions, types of completion, well completion design of Mechanical aspects of well testing, Subsurface completion equipment, and accessories, Well Head Equipment, Interval selection consideration and optimization of tubing dimensions for maximum production, Special consideration for horizontal and multilateral completions. Perforation of Oil and gas wells, Sand Control, Reservoir stimulation, Data acquisition, SCADA systems.
Completion technology for unconsolidated formations, Intelligent completion equipment, tubing string design (dimension, materials, and connections) based on pressure-temp. Operating conditions, safety requirements of HPHT and horizontal well completions, Work over equipment: Wire Line, Snubbing Unit, Coil Tubing, Completion and Work over design and execution of Deepwater completions: Recent trends.
Basics Of Well Testing And Interpretation, Fluid Flow in Porous Media: Derivation of Diffusivity Equation, Solutions of The Equation, Dimensionless Quantity. Basics of Well Testing and Interpretation. Fluid Flow in Porous Media: Derivation of diffusivity equation, Solutions of The Equation, dimensionless quantities. Pressure Build–up Tests: Procedure, analysis, Multirate Analysis, effects of fault, partial penetration, and deviated wells. Pressure Dropdown Tests: Procedure, analysis, multirate analysis, Type Curve Analysis: Need, Procedure, Types of well that can be analyzed, Typical examples using at least three different type curves. Drill Stem Test: Detailed Procedure, Analysis, Equipment Used; Other Well Tests: Gas Well Wests, Interference tests, Fractured well test, Horizontal well tests; Production Testing Equipment and Well head Equipment; Software Used to Analyze Above Tests.
Text books:
1. Well Completion Design, 1st Edition | Jonathan Bellarby , eBook ISBN: 9780080932521
2. Advanced Well Completion Engineering, (Third Edition), Wan Renpu,
ISBN: 978-0-12-385868
3. Well testing, Lee, John. New York: Society of Petroleum Engineers, 1982.
4. Well Testing in Heterogeneous Formations, Tatiana D. Streltsova: John wiley and sons.

Reference books:
1. Gatlin, C.; Petroleum Engineering, Drilling and Well Completions, Prentice-Hall, Inc. (1960).
2. Borgoyne, A. T., Chenevert, M. Milheim, K., and Young, F. S.: Applied Drilling Engineering, SPE Textbook Series, 1985.
3. Craft B.C et al “Well Design – Drilling and Production”, Prentice-HaIl, 1962.
4. Fundamentals of Formation Testing :Schlumberger, 2006.

Enhanced oil recovery

Objectives
The objective of this course to understand the fundamentals and theory of enhanced oil recovery; polymer flooding, surfactant flooding, miscible gas flooding and steam flooding; application of fractional flow theory; strategies and displacement performance calculations
Syllabus
General EOR: Definition of Reserves, Environmental and Economics Aspects of EOR Methods, Displacement Fundamentals, Reservoir Engineering Concepts for EOR, Factors Affecting Oil Recovery, Comparative Performance of Different EOR Methods, Screening Criteria and Technical Constraints.

Miscible Processes: General Overview of Solvent Methods, Phase Behavior Fundamentals from: Pressure/Temperature and Pressure/Composition Diagrams, Quantitative Representation of Phase Equilibria Processes.

Chemical and Polymer Flooding: Fractional Flow Theory, Dissipation in Immiscible Displacements, Applications of Fractional Flow in Oil Recovery Calculations, Homogeneous Reservoirs: Buckley­Leverett. One­dimensional displacement, Layered Reservoirs: Styles, Dykstra ¬Parsons and Johnson Methods. Improved Waterflooding Processes: Polymer Flooding, Rheology of Polymer Solutions, Polymer Adsorption and Retention, Micellar­Polymer or Microemulsion Flooding, Properties of Surfactants and Cosurfactants, Surfactant­Brine­Oil Phase Behavior, Performance Evaluation, Determination of Residual Oil Saturation­Tracers.

Thermal Processes: Steam Injection Processes, Cyclic and Continuous Steam Injection, Thermal Properties of Fluids and Solids, Steam Properties: Flow Rate and Quality Measurements. Temperature Effect on Reservoir and Fluid Properties, Viscosity Reduction, Thermal Expansion, Oil Characterization for Thermal Reservoir Simulation, Evaluation of Heat Losses, Prediction of Steam Flood Performance, Cyclic Steam Performance: Marx­ Langenheim model, Steam flood Performance: Gomaa’s Method.

Microbial EOR: Well bore clean up, well stimulation and enhanced water floods using microbes

Text Books:
1. Lake, L. (1991) Enhanced Oil Recovery, PennWell Publishing Company.
2. Donaldson, E. C., Chilngarian G. V., and T. F. Yen. (1985) Enhanced Oil Recovery-I, Elsevier Publications.
3. Latil, M. (1980): Enhanced Oil Recovery, Gulf Publications.
4. Green, D.W. and G. P. Willhite. (2003) Enhanced Oil Recovery, SPE.
Reference Books:
1. Carcoana, A. (1992) Applied Enhanced Oil Recovery, Prentice Hall.
2. James, G. (2009) Enhanced Recovery Methods for Heavy Oil and Tar Sands, Gulf Publishing Company.
3. Donaldson, E. C., Chilngarian G. V., and T. F. Yen. (1989) Enhanced Oil Recovery­ II: Processes and Operations. Elsevier Publications.
4. Ramirez, W. F. (1987) Application of Optimal Control Theory to Enhanced Oil Recovery, Elsevier Publications.

Applied Scientific Computing in Ocean and Petroleum Engineering

Objectives

In a structured manner, this course introduces the computing science and technology that is needed to design and analyze the computing intensive problems of ocean and petroleum engineering.

Syllabus

Module 1: Introduction to matrix computations, component wise error analysis, re-orthogonalization, and QR decomposition.

 

Module 2: Computer methods for curve fitting, numerical approximations, integration, interpolation, solution of sets of linear/non-linear equations, statistically improbable phrases (SIPs), non-linear multivariate statistical regression methods, and numerical solution of PDE’s.

 

Module 3: Parametric curves and surfaces, Bezier curves and surfaces, B-spline curves and surfaces, and Non-uniform rational B-spline curves and surfaces.

 

Module 4: Boundary integral methods and algorithms, boundary value problems with equi-valued surface within bounded or unbounded domain with piecewise smooth boundary, quasi-harmonic equations, imbedding theorem, weak compactness theorem, up-winding rules, segregated methods, immersed boundary techniques with mapping algorithms, multiphase flow problems, and multi-fluid models.

 

Module 5: Structured split and un-split method, cell and grid based computing, scalar advection equations, isentropic equations, soft computing techniques, optimization methods and applications to computing intensive problems of ocean and petroleum engineering.

 

Tutorials: The assignments will focus on hands on exercises and application of case studies.

 

Text books:

[1] Alfio Quarteroni, Fausto Saleri (2009), “Scientific Computing with MATLAB and Octave”, Springer (India) Pvt. Ltd.; 2 edition, ISBN-10: 8184894309.

[2] Azmy S. Ackleh, Edward James Allen, R. Baker Kearfott, Padmanabhan Seshaiyer (2009), “Classical and Modern Numerical Analysis: Theory, Methods and Practice”, Chapman and Hall/CRC USA, ISBN-10: 1420091573.

[3] Stephen J. Chapman (2007), “MATLAB Programming for Engineers”, Wadsworth Publishing Co. Inc., USA, 4th edition, ISBN-10: 049524449X.

[4] Mahinder Kumar Jain (2012), “Numerical Methods: For Scientific and Engineering Computation”, New Age, India, 6 edition, ISBN-10: 8122433235.

[5] M. D. Raisinghania (2016), “Ordinary and Partial Differential Equations”, S. Chand & Company, India, 18 edition, ISBN-10: 9385676164.

[6] Charles F. Van Loan (1999), “Introduction to Scientific Computing: A Matrix-Vector Approach Using MATLAB”, Pearson, USA, 2 edition, ISBN-10: 0139491570.

Reference books

[1] David Kincaid, E. W. Cheney (1991), “Numerical Analysis: Mathematics of Scientific Computing”, Brooks/Cole USA, ISBN-10: 0534130143.

[2] Daoqi Yang (2012), “C++ and Object-Oriented Numeric Computing for Scientists and Engineers”, Springer, 1st edition, ISBN-10: 1461265665.

 

[3] Shepley L. Ross (2007), “Differential Equations”, Wiley Inc., USA, 3 edition, ISBN-10: 8126515376.

Drilling Fluid Design and Analysis

Objectives

In a structured manner, this course introduces the science and technology that is needed to design and analyze the drilling/completion fluids at three levels (i.e. fundamental, application and advanced) of learning.

Syllabus

Module 1: Introduction about basic fluid mechanics, Basic functions of the drilling/completion fluids, Drilling/completion fluid types and applications.

 

Module 2: Standards and procedures for testing drilling/completion fluids, Drilling/completion fluid density and pressure control additives, Drilling/completion fluid viscosity and fluid loss measurements, Design of drilling/completion fluid additives, clays and polymers.

 

Module 3: Water-based drilling/completion fluids, salt-based drilling/completion fluids, non-aqueous drilling/completion fluids, special systems for drilling/completion fluids, Components and functions of circulation system, basic pressure drop computations, static and dynamic pressures and their measurement and control.

 

Module 4: Introduction to kick occurrences, avoidance, importance of drilling/completion fluids’ density, Solids control and disposal in drilling/completion fluids, Drilling/completion problems and their solutions related to drilling/completion fluids.

 

Module 5: Bore hole cleaning, problems and solutions for: stuck pipe, lost returns, loss of lubricity, pH and alkalinity, and contamination, etc. Drilling/completion fluids engineering computations with respect to specific reservoirs and health, safety and the environment.

 

Lab: The lab will deal with basic testing of the drilling/completion fluids.

 

Tutorials: The assignments will focus on hands on exercises and application of case studies.

Text books:

[[1] H. C. H. Darley and George R. Gray (1988), “Composition and Properties of Drilling and Completion Fluids”, Gulf Professional Publishing; 5 edition (April 5, 1988), ISBN-10: 087201147X.

[2] Andy Philips (2012), “So You Want to be a Mud Engineer: An Introduction to Drilling Fluids Technology”, CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform (July 21, 2012), ISBN-10: 1477674969.

[3] Kjell Thorbjørnsen (2009), “Drilling and Completion Fluids (Oil and gas, 17)”, Norwegian Petroleum Academy AS; 1 edition (2009), ISBN-10: 8231500057.

Reference books

[1] Johannes Fink (2015), “Water-Based Chemicals and Technology for Drilling, Completion, and Workover Fluids”, Gulf Professional Publishing; 1 edition (January 22, 2015),

ISBN-10: 0128025050.

[2] Jonathan Bellarby (2009), “Well Completion Design, Volume 56 (Developments in Petroleum Science)”, Series: Developments in Petroleum Science (Book 56), Elsevier Science; 1 edition (April 9, 2009), ISBN-10: 044453210.

Applied Hydrodynamics in Petroleum Exploration & Production

Objectives

  • To impart the knowledge of hydrodynamics as applicable in a complex sub-surface petroleum reservoir system under elevated temperature and pressure;
  • To enhance the knowledge of pressure controls on petroleum exploration as well as production.

 

Syllabus

Internal forces in hydrostatic and hydrodynamic sub-surface environments; hydraulic segregation of hydrocarbons; force models of hydrocarbon traps; hydrodynamic rock-water systems; interpretation of pressure-depth gradient plots and potentiometric surfaces; pressure deflection maps; tilted and displaced oil and gas pools.

Origins of abnormal pressure: development of abnormal pressure, low pressure environments, prediction and detection of over pressure, aqua-thermal pressuring, osmosis, imposed pressure and paleo-pressures; pressure engineering: pressure gradients of oil, water and gas, formation balance gradient, effective over-burden pressure in normal and geo-pressured formations, bottom hole circulating pressure, swab and surge pressures; Fracture pressure: past and current technology, estimation of fracture pressure, sub-surface stress states, zero tensile strength concept; pressure related problems: causes, effects and solutions of lost circulation, massive hydraulic fracturing and stimulation, kicks, pressures in carbonates.

Text Books:

Bear, J. (1972). Dynamics of fluids in porous media. Courier Dover Publications: New York, 764 pages.

Civan, F. (2011). Porous media transport phenomena. John Wiley & Sons: New Jersey, 463 pages.

Leonov, E. G., and V. I. Isaev. (2010). Applied hydro-aeromechanics in oil and gas drilling. John Wiley & Sons: New Jersey, 443 pages.

Dahlberg, E. C. (1994). Applied Hydrodynamics in petroleum exploration. 2nd Edition, Springer-Verlag: New York, 295 pages.

Phillips, O. M. (2009). Geological fluid dynamics: Sub-surface flow and reactions. Cambridge University Press: Cambridge, 285 pages.

 

 

 

Reference Books:

Chilingar, G. V., V. A. Serebryakov., and J. O. Robertson. (2002). Origin and prediction of abnormal formation pressures. Elsevier: Amsterdam, 373 pages.

Fertl, W. H., G. V. Chilingar., and H. H. Rieke. (1976). Abnormal formation pressures: Implications to exploration, drilling and production of oil and gas resources. Elsevier: Amsterdam, 382 pages.

Franciss, F. O. (2010). Fractured rock hydraulics. Taylor & Francis group: London, 170 pages.

Magara, K. (1978). Compaction and fluid migration: Practical petroleum geology. Elsevier: Amsterdam, 330 pages.

Tissot, B. P. and Welte, D. H. (1984). Petroleum formation and occurrence. 2nd Edition, Springer-Verlag: Berlin, 699 pages.

Petroleum Geology

Objectives

To integrate at a quantitative level several fields of geology with geophysics, geochemistry and engineering that comprise the science of petroleum geology. This will provide an understanding of petroleum systems, their exploration, development, production and economic aspects.

Syllabus

Introduction to petroleum geology – integrating at a quantitative level several fields of geology with geophysics, geochemistry and engineering that comprise the science of petroleum geology; occurrence, distribution and nature of petroleum – historical review of petroleum exploration, national and worldwide distribution of petroleum, essential characteristics of oil and gas

 

Basic rock formation processes – classification and origin of rocks, burial, lithification and diagenesis; geological time and dating geological events – how rocks are dated (absolute and relative time), importance of time in rock formation and deformation, lithostratigraphy and chronostratigraphy; fundamentals of maps and sections – concepts of strike and dip, isochores and isopachs, key characteristics of maps and sections, mapping structure and stratigraphy

 

Petroleum system – different states of natural occurrence, chemical composition and physical properties of petroleum, origin of petroleum; the subsurface environment – temperature within earth, pressure (lithostatic, hydrostatic and abnormal), subsurface waters, fluid dynamics

 

Reservoir rocks – classification of reservoir rocks (clastic, carbonate and evaportites), petrophysical properties; the source – source rocks characteristics, productivity and preservation of hydrocarbon, formation, maturation and types of hydrocarbon

Migration of oil and gas – primary and secondary migration, geologic factor4s controlling hydrocarbon migration, the reservoirs – porosity, permeability, effects of diagenesis on reservoir quality, fractured reservoirs, reservoir continuity

Hydrocarbon traps – classification of hydrocarbon traps – structural, stratigraphic, combination and hydrodynamic traps; timing of trap development relative to migration; cap rocks – general properties; methods of petroleum exploration; geostatistics in petroleum geology and approaches to reserves estimation; general introduction to methods of exploration.

Text Books:

Levorsen A.I., Geology of Petroleum, W.H. Freeman & Co, Gordonsville, Virginia, U.S.A., 1967.

  1. Tissot B.P. and Welte D.H., Petroleum Formation and Occurrence, Springer, Berlin, 1984.

Reference Books:

  1. Hobson G.D. and Tiratsoo E.N., Introduction to Petroleum Geology, Scientific Press, 1981.
  2. North F.K., Petroleum Geology, Kluver Academic Publishers, 1994.
  3. Selley R.C., Elements of Petroleum Geology, 2nd Edition, Academic Press, London, 1997.
  4. Singh L., Oil and Gas Field of India, Indian Petroleum Publishers, Dehra Dun, 2000.
  5. Tiab D., and Donaldson, E.C. Petrophysics: Theory and Practice of Measuring Reservoir Rock and Fluid Transport Properties, Gulf Publishing Company, Houston, Texas, 1996.
  6. Hunt J.M., Petroleum Geochemistry and Geology, 2nd Edition, W.H. Freeman, San Fransisco, 1996
Phased Array Systems : Design and Analysis

Objectives

Phased array processing systems that consist of multiple sensors are used in RADAR, SONAR, communications, seismics

and commercial audio. The arrays are similar to tra-ditional parabolic dish antennas in which they use spatial diversity to

focus transmit/receive energy along certain directions. Traditional antennas rely on mechanical steering to vary the focus

direction, which is slow and not feasible always. On the other hand, phased array systems electronically vary the phases

(and amplitudes) of the sensors. This principle is called as phase steering and offers speed and flexibility in varying the array

radiation or receive pattern. This course is the first part of a two semester offering on phased array processing. During

January-May, the course teaches spatial array design and analysis using the basics of antenna theory, and Finite Impulse

Response (FIR) systems. Thereceive and transmit beam patterns of various line, planar, and non-planar arrays are

discussed in terms of their beam-width, resolution, and spatial aliasing limitations. FIR design techniques are also used to

synthesize desired beam patterns. In addition to this, the course also discusses sparse and random arrays. The topics

covered in this course will be used in the August-December semester to develop spatial processing techniques.

Syllabus

Motivation for phased array systems, wave propagation fundamentals such as refraction, diffraction, wavenumbers, wavefront

curvature, near field, far field effects. Antenna fundamentals.

Radiation patterns for antenna apertures. Fourier transforms for signals in space. Effects of aperture, beamwidth, sidelobes,

and spatial tapers.

Arrays as sampled apertures. z-transform to calculate the beampattern of the spatial array. Effects of spatial sampling,

grating lobes, visible region, SNR gain and its relation to beamwidth.

Array design techniques using FIR theory. Analysis of various array config- urations such as line, planar and non-planar

arrays. Sparse arrays and sub-arrays will also be discussed.

Signal, interferer, and noise relationships for array systems. SNR, and array gain calculations. Introduction to detection and

estimation for arrays. Angle of Arrival estimation.

Text Books:

  1. Bernard D. Steinberg “Principles of Aperture and Array System Design: Including Random and Adaptive Arrays,” 1976

published by John Wiley and Sons

  1. D.H. Johnson and D.E. Dudgeon “Array Signal Processing,” 1993 published by Prentice Hall

Reference Book:

Harry L. Van Trees “Detection, Estimation, and Modulation Theory, Optimum Array Pro- cessing (Part IV),” 2002 published

by Wiley-Interscience

Environmental Impacts of Petroleum Exploration and Production

LEARNING OBJECTIVES

To impart a fundamental understanding on the various environmental problems associated with oil and gas exploration and production; and subsequently to bring into perspective the environmental impact associated with both onshore and offshore environments.

OUTCOMES

To understand the main issues and remediation techniques associated with the solid, liquid and gaseous wastes emerging from oil and gas exploration and production technologies; and to apply a critical-thinking and problem-solving approach in order to mitigate the environmental impacts of petroleum exploration and production activities.

Course Contents:

Offshore oil spill: accidental and operational oil pollution; marine pollution sources from ships, vessel-source and offshore petroleum extraction; fate of oil spills; natural weathering processes acting on spilled oil including evaporation, spreading, dispersion, water-in-emulsion, dissolution, oxidation, biodegradation and sedimentation; movement of oil slicks; oil spill response methods that include passive oil removal, manual oil removal, mechanical oil removal, chemical oil removal, bioremediation, thermal remediation, in-situ/controlled burning; equipment used for cleanup operations including boom and skimmer; case studies of major marine oil spills;

state of the art on offshore oil spill modelling.
Onshore oil spill: sources of onshore oil spill; LNAPL transport parameters; LNAPL transport through vadose and saturated zones; LNAPL migration at the field scale; LNAPL migration in fractured media; fate of LNAPLs in the subsurface including volatilization, dissolution, sorption and biodegradation; LNAPL site
characterization; estimating apparent LNAPL thickness; remediation techniques including excavation, recovery wells, soil-vapor extraction, air sparing and bioremediation; case studies of major onshore oil spills; LNAPL modelling.
Environmental impacts from conventional oil and gas fields: sources of spilled hydrocarbon accumulations in the vicinity of conventional oil and gas fields; contamination of groundwater aquifers by over-pressuring the annulus; drilling fluids and technologies; drilling fluids related environmental issues and regulations; drilling waste reduction techniques; waste disposal issues; environmental friendly drilling fluid technologies; advanced drilling waste management technologies.
Environmental impacts from unconventional oil and gas fields: geological principles of fracking and shale gas extraction; hydraulic fracturing fluids including proppants, gelling agents, friction reducers, cross-linkers, breakers, acids and bases, biocides, scale and corrosion inhibitors, clay stabilizers, and surfactants; flowback and produced water that includes production chemicals, dissolved minerals, metals, dissolved and dispersed oil components and produced solids; releases, effects and remediation of oil and gas production wastewater; pollution prevention techniques.
Text Books:
Doerffer, J . W. (1992). Oil Spill Response in the Marine Environment, Elsevier Publications, 392 pages.
Davidson, W.F., K. Lee., and A. Cogswell. (2008): Oil Spill response: A Global Perspective, Springer Publications, 345 pages.
Craft, B. C., M. Hawkins., and R. E. Terry. (1991). Applied Petroleum Reservoir Engineering (2nd Edition), Prentice Hall, 464 pages.
Yu-Shu Wu. (2016). Multiphase Fluid Flow in Porous and Fractured Reservoirs. Gulf Professional Publishing, 418 pages.
Reference Books:
Veil, J. A., and M. D. Dusseault. (2003). Evaluation of slurry injection technology for management of drilling wastes, U. S. Department of Energy, http://www.evs.anl.gov/pub/doc/si-tech-report-1584.pdf.
Gupta, D. V. S., and B. T. Hlidek. (2009). Frac fluid recycling and water conservation: a case history, SPE Hydraulic Fracturing Technology Conference, Woodlands, Texas, USA, January 19-21.
US Environmental Protection Agency. (2011). Hydraulic Fracturing. (US Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC), http://water.epa.gov/type/groundwater/uic/class2/hydraulicfracturing/.
Kerr RA (2010) Natural gas from shale bursts onto the scene. Science, 328:1624-1626.